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  • EEVblog #163 – Solder Paste Porn

    Posted on April 16th, 2011 EEVblog 28 comments

    Dave has a play with a German Martin brand Dot Liner automated Solder Paste Dispenser machine.
    http://www.martin-smt.de/en_p_d_dl06.php?contentInc=dispense

    All, see the Shanghai Special video for other automated solder machines:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9A1j2RkwJOc

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    28 responses to “EEVblog #163 – Solder Paste Porn” RSS icon

    • Hi Dave,

      Actually you can get away (especially on prototype runs) with leaving the paste on the boards for a day or two! I recently hand-placed ~3000 components on some prototype boards over a couple of days after stencilling on the paste.

      Nice machine. One day we’ll all have them ;)

      • Karl (not that Karl, the other Karl)

        No, no, we just design our circuit into an IC and print that IC at home.

        Just ask Dave about it, he actively monitors the progress in that area and can’t wait until we all make our chips at home ;-)

    • It’s a pretty straight foward XYZ bot setup.
      The trick would be the nozzle shape and controlling the air into the syringe to get paste delivery just right.

      • Yes, and that’s the secret to this one and why it costs $$,$$$ instead of $,$$$

        • Hobby CNC machines are fantastic tools and are very DIYable. I’ve built one that is 500x500x300mm for my student room. Cost around £600 including drive electronics, software and spindle.

          Mills SMD PCBs down to 0.005mm (the controller can make it finer but the play of my machine wont really allow it).

          Mills wood, plastic and metals too.

          I’ve been tempted to put a paste dispenser but I’ve found it’s easier to just mill out a stencil out of thin brass. Planning a 1 or 2W laser mounted on it for those fine pitch Mylar stencils.

          Software: http://www.planet-cnc.com/
          Machine: https://www.lumenlab.com/d/micro

          My machine is a very similar design to that one but is totally hand made. No easy task, but eventually you can use the machine to make itself better more accurate parts.

          Mine was made with hand tools. If I could go back in time I’d buy a pillar drill and a table saw first. Instead of cutting HDPE with a hacksaw and a hand drill >.< …

    • I’d love to know how they control the amount of paste dispersed. Just pressure? It seems like that wouldn’t work too well if the paste was ice cold v.s. room temp, paste type, etc…How do they do it?

      • I think the head has a heater? So may regulate the temp to get the consistency required. Because dispensing paste for 01005 parts is just freaking insane!

        • With those paste tubes the amount of paste is controlled by pressure and time pressure valve is kept open. Most likely temperature is kept constant too.
          It looks like in this setup the pressure always constant, so amount of paste can be altered by keeping the pressure valve open longer.

    • For an expensive machine like that I would expect to see the software being smart enough to sort the moves better to optimise speed – it was flying back on each row of the BGA instead of zig-zagging.

    • You will beg to die rather than do it manually

    • I assume this is just for rework?

      If you wanted to do a whole board this seems WAY slower and more accident prone than a steel stencil and a squeegee machine.

      And I guess if it’s for simple rework, you use more time setting up the machine that it would take to place a few dots of paste manually.

      Why this instead of the traditional squeegee machine. Size?

      • I agree. I can only see the practicality of this on a large production line where number of stencils used would out weigh the cost and time taken by the machine. Even then it would need to be much faster and over a conveyor line.

      • Yes, go to the product website and it clearly says it is for prototype and short run systems. There is a market for these machines.
        Setting up literally can be done in a minute or so, very simple.

        Dave.

    • You showed a little misalignment on the video. Did you have problems afterwards reflowing the board?

    • Who’s the lucky camera man/woman you’re using this time? :)

    • @6:50 oh no – he did it!

      Comic Sans MS all the way…

    • I’d love to also see a video with one of the small scale PCB milling machines!

      The dispenser actually seems to press on the PCB pretty hard. The panel you were testing on had routing across each board and you could see the board flexing a little every time the tip was applied.
      I’d imagine this could cause some issues with the finest pitch parts.
      With a stiffer board/less routing/supports underneath the board you could probably stop it flexing. But would that then put undue pressure on the dispensing tip when it presses into the board? It’s hard to see the exact design of the tip.

      Keep up the GREAT work! Love the blog.

    • So if this is for short production prototype runs only,

      and the super cheap diy way is to use a stencil from a laser printer and a squeegy..

      then what technique are the massive production lines doing?

      • Production houses use expensive stainless steel stencils and automated squeegy machines with automated conveyor belts. See my Shanghai Special video for a demo.

    • But if you’re getting the boards made, can’t you get a stencil made up too? That’s the part I don’t understand!

      • If you are reworking a board (BGA for example) then using a stencil and and a squeegy ain’t so easy when you have other existing parts populated on the board.

    • If you need speed for paste dispencing without stencil, check out the Mydata MY500.

    • Where in Sydney is the workshop and when can I visit? :)

    • This is driving me nuts!!! Is that Altium? I can’t help but notice the Altium Designer JTAG board under that stack near the machine, nor the Altium part in your old intro, nor the Altium board you had in an early video :) I’ve got an Altium NanoBoard2 at work, and it’s a really nice piece of kit.

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