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  • EEVblog #454 – JVC Camcorder Teardown

    Posted on April 17th, 2013 EEVblog 6 comments

    Teardown Tuesday
    Inside a JVC comsumer camcorder
    What design and systems engineering awaits?

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    • Chris

      Nice.

      I don’t work for a consumer electronics company per se, but we do have cross-functional design teams like you were talking about. Some projects need it more than others, but I (EE) always have at least some work to do with an ME and PCB designer, making sure stuff gets put in the right place, and mfg engineers making sure I don’t put out a design that’s a pain to build.

      Is it just me, or does one of the wires on the “stereo” mic FFC have holes in it such that it doesn’t look like it would connect? (about 14:00).

      Thanks for the teardown!

      • Nick

        It looks to me as pen marks not holes nor copper free FFC.

    • Chris

      And by the way, I agree with you that the cross-discipline work can be one of the funner parts of a design. Not always (which way round does this connector go?), but certainly it often adds some nice interest to the process.

    • Nick

      The photosensor board is named CMOS-PWB ASSY so that is very likely a CMOS based chip.

    • Worf

      That TI DAC would be required anyways – camcorders, including HD ones, still include a boring old SD analog output so you can hook it to a TV to quickly view what’s recorded. They normally output composite video, but some more advanced ones include component video outputs as well.

      So you need the DAC anyways, the Sony LCD controller is simply using what’s already there.

      It wasn’t all song and dance for the LCD. Chances are it was simply reusing what was there anyways.

    • Brutte

      I have spotted TMPM395FW in that stuff.
      This is a 20MHz ARM Cortex-M3 from Toshiba. According to datasheet it has 128kB flash, 8kB ram and 128 balls.

      http://www.semicon.toshiba.co.jp/eng/product/micro/tx03_detail/1306634_13778.html

      This is the first M series ARM I have seen in a consumer electronics.