Author Topic: Circuit Board Help  (Read 12066 times)

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Offline hans maree

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Re: Circuit Board Help
« Reply #25 on: December 21, 2014, 11:46:36 pm »
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is it in the same line as the jumper wires that connect to the camera and i couldnt see the row as well.
I assume you are referring to the COLUMN instead of the row. On a breadboard the columns are labelled with letters and the rows with numbers (its a bit confusing since the rows run vertical depending on how you look at it).
So yes in my picture the capacitor is in the same column as the wires, but that does not matter since only the ROWS are connected inside the breadboard.

Since you seem very new to all this, maybe it is a good idea to try an even simpler circuit first, just to get a feeling of how the breadboard works. You could for example follow this guide:
http://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-fair-projects/project_ideas/Elec_primer-simplecircuit.shtml

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Thank you for the reply i really appreciate it :)
No problem, I'm happy to help!
 

Offline Midas

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Re: Circuit Board Help
« Reply #26 on: December 22, 2014, 06:24:09 pm »
Ok I made changes and I wanted to get a quick check to make sure the layout is correct. I got an external battery that gives 4.5 V and i put jumper wires on there as well I have opened the camera and will look at the shutters area to see what to solder i do have a multimeter to see which is positive and negative.
 

Offline Midas

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Re: Circuit Board Help
« Reply #27 on: December 26, 2014, 02:36:03 pm »
No you definitely don't need an Arduino to do something like this. You can probably get away with a simple transistor and some passive components.

I have attached the schematic for a circuit that I think should work.
The capacitor and resistor form a high-pass filter that shortens the pulse coming from the sensor. This might not be necessary, but the camera may expect the button to be pressed for only a short amount of time.
The resulting pulse is then used to switch on a MOSFET that will trigger the camera. I used a 2N7000, but pretty much any logic level N-channel MOSFET will do.

Also attached is a picture of the breadboard version I made. In this OUT of your sensor would come in where my red oscilloscope probe is connected. You would connect the black wire behind the transistor to the negative side of the trigger button and the white wire to the positive side of the trigger button. To determine what the positive side is you should probably measure this with a multimeter when the camera is on.

EDIT: whoops, I had positive and negative reversed in my explanation :palm: fixed now.

Hello I would attach the black wire to ground and the white wire to the positive side of course. My issue is if I am looking for ground on the camera where would I find the positive side I know with the camera it would say GND. I am also asking where would I find ground at  least cause I have looked everywhere on the camera I will look between the boards now since I am having issues now. I assumed it would be where you click for the camera to take a photo, but i did not see it there.
 

Offline Midas

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Re: Circuit Board Help
« Reply #28 on: December 27, 2014, 05:01:58 am »
I am having issues with trying to find the ground on the camera. I assumed I would see an area that says GND on the camera but I cant seem to find it. I looked around the area where you take a pic but I cant seem to find anything.
 

Offline Falcon69

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Re: Circuit Board Help
« Reply #29 on: December 27, 2014, 05:09:36 am »
look at D9.

See the stripe on the chip? The stripe is the cathode. That means other side is the Anode and most likely THAT is connected to ground, or a ground plane.

I would also think that everywhere they have those black screws, that would be a ground plane as well.
 

Offline Midas

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Re: Circuit Board Help
« Reply #30 on: December 27, 2014, 06:24:10 am »
The stripe? Are you talking about on the far left side kind of designed as a sketch above the box of white numbers and letters
 

Offline Midas

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Re: Circuit Board Help
« Reply #31 on: December 27, 2014, 06:58:08 pm »
Here it goes this should help the yellow circle is D9 the red circle I am making an assumption that this is the stripe you are referring to?
 

Offline hans maree

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Re: Circuit Board Help
« Reply #32 on: December 27, 2014, 11:31:10 pm »
Hi,

Falcon69 is referring to the stripe on the diode itself, the yellowish band above the numbers 3435 on D9.
However there is an easier way to find the correct side of the button. Just turn the camera on and measure the voltage across the button. My guess is that the side where it says SW1 is the positive side.
 

Offline Midas

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Re: Circuit Board Help
« Reply #33 on: December 28, 2014, 12:40:20 pm »
Hi,

Falcon69 is referring to the stripe on the diode itself, the yellowish band above the numbers 3435 on D9.
However there is an easier way to find the correct side of the button. Just turn the camera on and measure the voltage across the button. My guess is that the side where it says SW1 is the positive side.

I circled in yellow what I tried to measure and what I assumed you meant the areas colored in pink are the areas my lead of the multimeter touched sometimes I got something sometimes I didn't so I was not sure. I also was not sure where to put the red and black led and which point cause even if you switch them it would give a negative number if the area im measuring is indeed positive.  |O
 

Offline hans maree

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Re: Circuit Board Help
« Reply #34 on: December 30, 2014, 04:07:12 am »
You are measuring the right points. If you get a positive voltage on the multimeter your red lead is on the positive side of the button and the black lead on the negative side. These points is where you would solder your wires on.
 

Offline Midas

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Re: Circuit Board Help
« Reply #35 on: December 30, 2014, 04:01:29 pm »
You are measuring the right points. If you get a positive voltage on the multimeter your red lead is on the positive side of the button and the black lead on the negative side. These points is where you would solder your wires on.

Ok I am still s bit loss on how to measure it I am understand what you are saying and the goal just a bit lost. So the red and black on the diagram is the red and black lead. The brown line connecting the 2 points are the measurement. So, I pretty much measured every point I could find. Ok so the red do on the right that has a diagonal line connecting the black dot gave me a positive voltage it was like 3.22. The left red dot connecting the right black dot gave me a negative. Above those measurements you have a black and red dot line with a horizontal brown line giving a positive measurement. Yet the horizontal brown line at the bottom with the red and black dot hardly gave a voltage from what I can I remember.
 

Offline Midas

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Re: Circuit Board Help
« Reply #36 on: December 30, 2014, 04:07:50 pm »
Ok I made changes and I wanted to get a quick check to make sure the layout is correct. I got an external battery that gives 4.5 V and i put jumper wires on there as well I have opened the camera and will look at the shutters area to see what to solder i do have a multimeter to see which is positive and negative.

Is this correct my layout and I plan on using these wires from radioshack to solder?
http://www.radioshack.com/solderless-breadboard-jumper-wire-kit/2760173.html#.VKIzGoBA
 

Offline Midas

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Re: Circuit Board Help
« Reply #37 on: December 31, 2014, 04:46:05 pm »
Can you also tell me where I would solder the wires as well?
 

Offline Midas

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Re: Circuit Board Help
« Reply #38 on: January 03, 2015, 01:25:11 pm »
 :-// Any input from anyone regarding my last couple of questions?
 

Offline WattsUp

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Re: Circuit Board Help
« Reply #39 on: January 03, 2015, 01:47:39 pm »
You can use those jumpers, but they are intended for breadboard use mainly. I would get some stranded wire (the inside is made of many thin copper wires) which is more flexible, and will be easy to solder.
Ben
I'm trying out something new. Perspective Reviews. Comments and suggestions are appreciated over PM.
 

Offline WattsUp

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Re: Circuit Board Help
« Reply #40 on: January 03, 2015, 01:55:06 pm »
Also, if it works like a normal push button the two vertical points would be connected to each other. You can check this by using the continuity setting on your multimeter, by putting one lead on each point, lined up vertically as seen on this picture. Also, if you are getting some voltage, it is almost certainly the positive part, as the fluctuation could just be a dodgy connection. Hope this helps,
Ben
I'm trying out something new. Perspective Reviews. Comments and suggestions are appreciated over PM.
 

Offline Midas

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Re: Circuit Board Help
« Reply #41 on: January 03, 2015, 01:58:26 pm »
Also, if it works like a normal push button the two vertical points would be connected to each other. You can check this by using the continuity setting on your multimeter, by putting one lead on each point, lined up vertically as seen on this picture. Also, if you are getting some voltage, it is almost certainly the positive part, as the fluctuation could just be a dodgy connection. Hope this helps,
Ben

ok so the vertical points is where I would measure and solder?
 

Offline WattsUp

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Re: Circuit Board Help
« Reply #42 on: January 03, 2015, 02:05:41 pm »
If I understand correctly, you want to bypass the original switch, and replace it with your own, which will be controlled via your sensor. Therefore, you must solder your circuit onto the contact which shows no voltage when you measured it (or the pair of contacts).
Ben
I'm trying out something new. Perspective Reviews. Comments and suggestions are appreciated over PM.
 

Offline Midas

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Re: Circuit Board Help
« Reply #43 on: January 03, 2015, 02:09:07 pm »
If I understand correctly, you want to bypass the original switch, and replace it with your own, which will be controlled via your sensor. Therefore, you must solder your circuit onto the contact which shows no voltage when you measured it (or the pair of contacts).
Ben

ok yes when I would measure the vertical points I would get zero on the left side and fluctuations on the right. I assumed you meant I am suppose to see a voltage when I measure it. I guess I would solder on the right side since I get zero what do you think?  :)
 

Offline WattsUp

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Re: Circuit Board Help
« Reply #44 on: January 03, 2015, 02:20:15 pm »
Ok so you have to solder your power (Vcc) connection to your +ve side of the battery, and the GND part to a GND point of the circuit. Then you solder the output signal of your sensor to the side of the switch that is actuated when you push it. This means that instead of the switch sending the signal to take a picture, it is your sensor when it registers movement.
I'm trying out something new. Perspective Reviews. Comments and suggestions are appreciated over PM.
 

Offline Midas

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Re: Circuit Board Help
« Reply #45 on: January 03, 2015, 02:23:19 pm »
Also, if it works like a normal push button the two vertical points would be connected to each other. You can check this by using the continuity setting on your multimeter, by putting one lead on each point, lined up vertically as seen on this picture. Also, if you are getting some voltage, it is almost certainly the positive part, as the fluctuation could just be a dodgy connection. Hope this helps,
Ben

Another thing so basically at the top of the button on picture it would be positive and the bottom of button would be negative and I should not get a voltage when I measure them. In the diagram I measured horizontally and diagonally because I got a numerical voltage I assumed I was suppose to. It makes sense that I am not suppose to get a voltage where I measure because you don't want to distract other areas on the camera or destroy.
 

Offline Midas

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Re: Circuit Board Help
« Reply #46 on: January 03, 2015, 02:25:47 pm »
Ok so you have to solder your power (Vcc) connection to your +ve side of the battery, and the GND part to a GND point of the circuit. Then you solder the output signal of your sensor to the side of the switch that is actuated when you push it. This means that instead of the switch sending the signal to take a picture, it is your sensor when it registers movement.

On page 2 I kind of already did my breadboard I took a picture of it and showed cause a member did a schematic for me here is the link its on reply #26. http://www.eevblog.com/forum/beginners/circuit-board-help/15/
 

Offline Midas

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Re: Circuit Board Help
« Reply #47 on: January 04, 2015, 11:03:55 am »
Hello I have a plan I would like to share and I would like to thank everyone's help in this thread and thank everyone for taking the time to read it. The first photo there is a diagram I have. The 2nd photo below it is just the original photo of the camera with no writing or drawings on it. In the photo, the area encircled in yellow is the area I measured and planned. The red and black points measured I will solder the cords there (is that logic correct meaning is that the correct points to wire my jumper wire?).These points are also the area where I put my red and black leads of the multimeter and got zero little fluctuations and was quite steady. In the pink area encircled, a person told me to measure that area to determine where the ground plane was located. The red and black points these are the points I put my red and black leads of my multimeter and got a fluctuation in voltage but generally zero I think I can say not sure (their were huge fluctuations so I wanted to check it again).

So basically should I solder the jumper wire on that exact points in the yellow encircled area?
 

Offline Midas

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Re: Circuit Board Help
« Reply #48 on: January 05, 2015, 05:21:58 am »
 :-//
 

Online Hero999

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Re: Circuit Board Help
« Reply #49 on: January 05, 2015, 10:06:21 am »
It looks like it should work.

Try leaving the switch in place, just in case.
 


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