Author Topic: EEVblog #168 - How To Set Up An Electronics Lab  (Read 42205 times)

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Offline tecman

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Re: EEVblog #168 - How To Set Up An Electronics Lab
« Reply #25 on: May 01, 2011, 04:07:06 am »
One more observation.  If you are planning to do critical audio work, the function generator may not be the first choice.  You would want a generator with very low distortion.  Usually what is typically called an audio generator is desired.  Sine only, sometimes with square as well, but you can get them with 0.001% harmonic distortion.  Older HPs and some Tek TM500's are available on eBay for a reasonable price.

paul
 

Offline Ernie Milko

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Re: EEVblog #168 - How To Set Up An Electronics Lab
« Reply #26 on: May 01, 2011, 04:23:06 am »
A very good video, I thought.
 

Offline Chet T16

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Re: EEVblog #168 - How To Set Up An Electronics Lab
« Reply #27 on: May 01, 2011, 04:26:39 am »
"Is it worth a buy?" skimmed through again, and this time with details and deep thought, put your illusion aside. you've been foolish to read what you dont want to read. btw, who's been off topic?


You seem set on taking my lighthearted comments the wrong way!

Chet
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Studying ME Computer and Electronics
 

Offline squeezee

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Re: EEVblog #168 - How To Set Up An Electronics Lab
« Reply #28 on: May 01, 2011, 06:11:15 am »
What type of tweezers do people recommend for handling/positioning surface mount components. Just had a look on Farnells site and there are a confusing selection. I need a basic set that can handle 1206 chip caps/resistors and small SOIC IC's. Also does anyone sell stainless toothpicks for positioning parts under a microscope?
Thanks.

David.
You can use a cheap set of dental picks. Distributors sell them as well (eg. digikey), check in the "Scribers & Probes" category on farnell.
 

Offline mikeselectricstuff

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Re: EEVblog #168 - How To Set Up An Electronics Lab
« Reply #29 on: May 01, 2011, 09:33:15 am »
One more observation.  If you are planning to do critical audio work, the function generator may not be the first choice.  You would want a generator with very low distortion.  Usually what is typically called an audio generator is desired.  Sine only, sometimes with square as well, but you can get them with 0.001% harmonic distortion.  Older HPs and some Tek TM500's are available on eBay for a reasonable price.

paul

A PC soundcard or external USB audio interface may well  give you better quality audio-band waveforms than a function generator.
Youtube channel:Taking wierd stuff apart. Very apart.
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Offline johnmx

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Re: EEVblog #168 - How To Set Up An Electronics Lab
« Reply #30 on: May 01, 2011, 09:57:23 am »
I would like to show you how I organize the spare parts. I have an updated list of all components (IC’s, diodes and transistors) and keep them in small boxes which are labeled (see attached image).
This list (excel file) has several pages, one for each part type: uC, opamp, regulators, etc.
Each line corresponds to a single part and has all the information needed: exact model number, quantity, SMD or through-hole indication, small description with the most important features, link to data sheet and finally the box number where it is stored.
This list is very useful when developing a new project. In this way I always know what components I have or not and the respective packages in case I’m designing the PCB.
Best regards,
johnmx
 

Offline AdShea

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Re: EEVblog #168 - How To Set Up An Electronics Lab
« Reply #31 on: May 01, 2011, 10:01:12 am »
I'd suggest putting a bit more into tweezers (only 12USD) and get a really nice pair.  I've got some of these http://search.digikey.com/scripts/DkSearch/dksus.dll?WT.z_header=search_go&lang=en&site=us&keywords=243-1096-ND&x=0&y=0 and the big blue grip is totally worth it.  By not making me grip so close I've found I can even do 0603 without magnification now.
 

Online Mechatrommer

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Re: EEVblog #168 - How To Set Up An Electronics Lab
« Reply #32 on: May 01, 2011, 05:08:13 pm »
"Is it worth a buy?" skimmed through again, and this time with details and deep thought, put your illusion aside. you've been foolish to read what you dont want to read. btw, who's been off topic?
You seem set on taking my lighthearted comments the wrong way!
i'm sorry if its misinterpreted (maybe just my illusion). but be carefull with your statement, there's people with not so lighthearted here. and you simple joke of "mech is a god->off topic" might not work with others, esp me.

anyway just want to add to the collection... i have this in my lab (workroom)...

« Last Edit: May 01, 2011, 05:16:26 pm by Mechatrommer »
if something can select, how cant it be intelligent? if something is intelligent, how cant it exist?
 

Offline FreeThinker

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Re: EEVblog #168 - How To Set Up An Electronics Lab
« Reply #33 on: May 01, 2011, 08:32:46 pm »
Can't believe anyone has not mentioned one of these before... absolutely essential http://www.joke-archives.com/oddsends/achtung.html
Machines were mice and Men were lions once upon a time, but now that it's the opposite it's twice upon a time.
MOONDOG
 

Offline Cj1corbystarlet

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Re: EEVblog #168 - How To Set Up An Electronics Lab
« Reply #34 on: May 01, 2011, 08:51:08 pm »
A good nudie calender on the wall never goes astray.   :P
 

Offline Kiriakos-GR

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Re: EEVblog #168 - How To Set Up An Electronics Lab
« Reply #35 on: May 01, 2011, 10:00:07 pm »
A good nudie calender on the wall never goes astray.   :P

Do not mix the standard tools of Electricians,
with the those for Electronics Lab  ;D

They have an nudie calender with the Arduino on it.
« Last Edit: May 01, 2011, 10:04:16 pm by Kiriakos-GR »
 

Offline tecman

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Re: EEVblog #168 - How To Set Up An Electronics Lab
« Reply #36 on: May 02, 2011, 02:47:06 am »


Do not mix the standard tools of Electricians,
with the those for Electronics Lab  ;D

They have an nudie calender with the Arduino on it.

I hate to disagree with a fellow countryman (sort of, I am second generation greek-american), but many projects eventually require electricians tools for striping, crimping, cutting and wiring things.  Although most electrician's tools do not sit on my bench, they are in the toolbox 6 feet away.

paul
 

Offline dengorius

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Re: EEVblog #168 - How To Set Up An Electronics Lab
« Reply #37 on: May 02, 2011, 03:43:13 am »
In case anybody is interested, this is the power supply kit from Silicon Chip that Dave mentions in the video

Article: http://www.siliconchip.com.au/cms/A_30603/article.html
Front/Rear panel: http://us1.webpublications.com.au/static/downloads/articles/30603_quad_power_supply_panels_fr.pdf
Front PCB: http://us1.webpublications.com.au/static/downloads/articles/30603_quadpowersupply_front_pcb.pdf
Main PCB: http://us1.webpublications.com.au/static/downloads/articles/30603_quad_power_supply_main_pcb.pdf

Unfortunately if you want all the details you have to purchase the article from the first link

Cya :)
 

Offline Kiriakos-GR

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Re: EEVblog #168 - How To Set Up An Electronics Lab
« Reply #38 on: May 02, 2011, 04:05:50 am »
Hello Paul , I was exclusively refer to the wall calendar post .  ( that was an smart made joke )  :)


Regards
Kiriakos
 

Offline kcs

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Re: EEVblog #168 - How To Set Up An Electronics Lab
« Reply #39 on: May 02, 2011, 06:20:31 am »
Which soldering wire out of these three should I pick? In the video Dave told to choose 60/40 one but then he agreed with someone on youteube, that 63/37 is better choice, but I cannot find such one.

One more question - why is the last one in the list so expensive?
 

Offline SnakeBite

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Re: EEVblog #168 - How To Set Up An Electronics Lab
« Reply #40 on: May 02, 2011, 06:33:16 am »
60/40 was a standart solder for many years it included tin and lead and today it more comon to use 63/37 solder because it has lower melting temperature and it has lightly greater mechanical
strength.

you can read the rest here
http://www.edaboard.co.uk/60-40-vs-63-37-solder-t469133.html
Ido Aricha , Israel.
 

Offline david77

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Re: EEVblog #168 - How To Set Up An Electronics Lab
« Reply #41 on: May 02, 2011, 06:34:55 am »
The last one has a bit of silver in it, that bumps the price up a bit.
However, I do find all of those three rather expensive. Why not pick a 0,5mm for half the price?

Like this one: http://uk.farnell.com/multicore-solder/3096525-m/solder-wire-60-40-0-5mm-250g/dp/5090787

 

Offline tecman

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Re: EEVblog #168 - How To Set Up An Electronics Lab
« Reply #42 on: May 02, 2011, 08:06:40 am »
Which soldering wire out of these three should I pick? In the video Dave told to choose 60/40 one but then he agreed with someone on youteube, that 63/37 is better choice, but I cannot find such one.

One more question - why is the last one in the list so expensive?


You should try to get 63/37.  It is known as eutectic solder.  This means that it is an allow that has only solid and liquid states (other than vapor at high temps).  All other alloys have a third "shush" state.  If you do a lot of soldering with 50/50 or 60/40 you will remember the slush state.  This means that 63/37 is a bit easier to work with, and has the same basic properties of 60/40.

paul
 

Offline Kiriakos-GR

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Re: EEVblog #168 - How To Set Up An Electronics Lab
« Reply #43 on: May 02, 2011, 10:07:42 am »
Well I will add too an suggestion about a tool  ;)

I got it for heatshrink tubes, but now I use it for many more tasks.
Drying out washed PCB , softening plastics , testing K probes,  and many more applications..

http://www.eevblog.com/forum/index.php?topic=1093.0   

 
 

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Re: EEVblog #168 - How To Set Up An Electronics Lab
« Reply #44 on: May 02, 2011, 11:15:34 am »
Well I will add too an suggestion about a tool  ;)

I got it for heatshrink tubes, but now I use it for many more tasks.

The secret to that immaculate Kiriakos blow wave is finally out.   ;D
 

Offline amigo

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Re: EEVblog #168 - How To Set Up An Electronics Lab
« Reply #45 on: May 02, 2011, 11:56:20 am »
I thought I read that reason we should use 63/37 solder is because the melting points of the compounds are close to/identical, as opposed to 60/40 whereas one would melt sooner than the other and make a mess of the soldering work.
 

Offline Kiriakos-GR

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Re: EEVblog #168 - How To Set Up An Electronics Lab
« Reply #46 on: May 02, 2011, 02:33:53 pm »
Well I will add too an suggestion about a tool  ;)

I got it for heatshrink tubes, but now I use it for many more tasks.

The secret to that immaculate Kiriakos blow wave is finally out.   ;D

I have an small difficulty to translate the text 100% , but it looks that it says goods things for me ..  :D

Long live the Uncle Vernon   ;)
 

Offline johnwa

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Re: EEVblog #168 - How To Set Up An Electronics Lab
« Reply #47 on: May 02, 2011, 08:11:56 pm »
One useful category of items is resistance/capacitance substitution boxes. Even a 100k pot with some croc clip leads attached can be quite useful. If you don't know what you're doing when designing something, just substitute the pot for a fixed resistor, adjust until your circuit works best, measure the pot, and now you know what value resistor to use :) Put a 1k in series with the wiper, so you don't blow stuff up when you turn it all one way.

I agree with the suggestion of croc clip jumper leads - they are good for prototyping circuits that exceed the power handling capabilities of a breadboard.

You will probably be building things with mains power supplies eventually, so an isolation transformer and insulation tester are a good idea.
 

Offline kcs

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Re: EEVblog #168 - How To Set Up An Electronics Lab
« Reply #48 on: May 02, 2011, 08:54:32 pm »
Which soldering wire out of these three should I pick? In the video Dave told to choose 60/40 one but then he agreed with someone on youteube, that 63/37 is better choice, but I cannot find such one.

One more question - why is the last one in the list so expensive?


You should try to get 63/37.  It is known as eutectic solder.  This means that it is an allow that has only solid and liquid states (other than vapor at high temps).  All other alloys have a third "shush" state.  If you do a lot of soldering with 50/50 or 60/40 you will remember the slush state.  This means that 63/37 is a bit easier to work with, and has the same basic properties of 60/40.

paul


So I should pick this one - 62/36/2 Sn/Pb/Ag?
 

Offline tecman

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Re: EEVblog #168 - How To Set Up An Electronics Lab
« Reply #49 on: May 03, 2011, 12:21:21 am »
I thought I read that reason we should use 63/37 solder is because the melting points of the compounds are close to/identical, as opposed to 60/40 whereas one would melt sooner than the other and make a mess of the soldering work.

Here is a brief explanation:  http://www.ami.ac.uk/courses/topics/0244_tsm/index.html

Paul
 


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