Author Topic: EEVblog #395 - World's Most Expensive Hard Drive Teardown  (Read 23872 times)

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Offline SeanB

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Re: EEVblog #395 - World's Most Expensive Hard Drive Teardown
« Reply #45 on: December 08, 2012, 04:35:46 PM »
They actually use cholesterols ( the same as what is in your arteries) as the fill. they have a polarising front like a LCD, and the cholesterol s are different types, so that as they hit a certain narrow temperature range the optical twisting that they do of polarised light ( from the front filter) is 45 degrees. the back reflector then reflects, it goes through another 45 degree shift then it can go out and you can see the back reflector and the markings. At higher or lower temps there is either too much or too little phase shift, so it remains black. The colours come from fringing  as the polarisation approaches the 90 degree point. Totally passive, absolutely no moving parts and reversible.

the other variant more commonly used in engineering is a max indicating type, which has small  black coloured wax dots inside a carrier, so that as the wax melts it is wicked away in a surrounding reservoir and exposes a coloured backing that shows the top temperature reached. Once use only, but quite good as a log of overheating or max temp in say a heatsink during operation, where you either cannot or do not want or can use a data logger.

Online Zad

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Re: EEVblog #395 - World's Most Expensive Hard Drive Teardown
« Reply #46 on: December 08, 2012, 05:34:38 PM »
I remember seeing those thermometer strips in the RS (Radio Spares back then) catalogue in the 1980s. I tried to persuade my dad to buy some, but for some reason he refused. Probably the phenomenally high price back then.


Offline bitwelder

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Re: EEVblog #395 - World's Most Expensive Hard Drive Teardown
« Reply #47 on: December 08, 2012, 07:42:48 PM »
Yes, everyone says they have seen them on aquariums and home-brew beer. I'm into neither, so have never seen them.

Dave.
I worked in a computer datacenter and I've seen them attached to several racks there, especially in the aisles where the server density was relatively high.

Offline SeanB

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Re: EEVblog #395 - World's Most Expensive Hard Drive Teardown
« Reply #48 on: December 08, 2012, 09:34:25 PM »
We had a simpler one, one heatsink ran so hot that the most common fault was the BUX20's in it unsoldering themselves....... Limited space, and no way to redesign...... Would have loved to have modern MOSFETS in there, they would have handled the job with no problems.

Offline Hypernova

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Re: EEVblog #395 - World's Most Expensive Hard Drive Teardown
« Reply #49 on: December 10, 2012, 01:39:07 PM »
I thought about getting some of those stickers for heat sink temp monitoring and in the course of my search found this place:
http://www.telatemp.com/p/492/
16 steps of 5C from 25 to 100 ought to do it for most people.

That's probably the true source for the majority of the sellers out there. At $40 for a pack of 20 it isn't that much, and they have variants reaching 120C. There are shops on the web that resell them at single quantities.
« Last Edit: December 10, 2012, 01:43:10 PM by Hypernova »

Offline jabramo

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Re: EEVblog #395 - World's Most Expensive Hard Drive Teardown
« Reply #50 on: December 12, 2012, 04:49:13 AM »
Holy smokes this teardown is getting tons of attention! Front page Gizmodo, Extreme Tech and Hackaday

Offline cwalex

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Re: EEVblog #395 - World's Most Expensive Hard Drive Teardown
« Reply #51 on: December 12, 2012, 10:16:38 PM »
It was a really nice teardown as usual by Dave but I like the more standard off the shelf kinds of tear downs as I learn more about product design (do's and don'ts) etc  but honestly I would rather see dave get heaps of exposure so he can make more out of his new full time gig! than just see more stuff that I personally like to see.

Good videos as always Dave! Thanks for all that you do for us :)
"life should be effortless and enjoyable and vaguely annoying to other people." - Mike Mandel

Online EEVblog

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Re: EEVblog #395 - World's Most Expensive Hard Drive Teardown
« Reply #52 on: December 12, 2012, 10:49:37 PM »
Holy smokes this teardown is getting tons of attention! Front page Gizmodo, Extreme Tech and Hackaday

Yeah, probably my most popular video to date in terms views in such a short time.

Dave.

Offline JoannaK

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Re: EEVblog #395 - World's Most Expensive Hard Drive Teardown
« Reply #53 on: December 13, 2012, 09:19:22 AM »
Was expecting something a bit bigger... But I'd assume there's not many of those PDP-8 era (or older) hard drive units available. We (bunch of Uni students) did purchase one (with PDP-8) about 30+ odd years ago, not that we'd needed but it was kinds funky to have fridge/Freezer size HD system with removeable platters.

Not sure where those parts are these days.. Not even sure if I could find any photos of the system.

Offline alanb

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Re: EEVblog #395 - World's Most Expensive Hard Drive Teardown
« Reply #54 on: December 17, 2012, 11:06:11 PM »
Quote
Posted by: JoannaK
« on: December 12, 2012, 10:19:22 PM » Insert Quote
Was expecting something a bit bigger... But I'd assume there's not many of those PDP-8 era (or older) hard drive units available. We (bunch of Uni students) did purchase one (with PDP-8) about 30+ odd years ago, not that we'd needed but it was kinds funky to have fridge/Freezer size HD system with removeable platters.

Try Googling CDC Hawk.

Offline JoannaK

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Re: EEVblog #395 - World's Most Expensive Hard Drive Teardown
« Reply #55 on: December 18, 2012, 12:54:06 PM »
Quote
Posted by: JoannaK
« on: December 12, 2012, 10:19:22 PM » Insert Quote
Was expecting something a bit bigger... But I'd assume there's not many of those PDP-8 era (or older) hard drive units available. We (bunch of Uni students) did purchase one (with PDP-8) about 30+ odd years ago, not that we'd needed but it was kinds funky to have fridge/Freezer size HD system with removeable platters.

Try Googling CDC Hawk.

Something like that for sure.. Kinda scary when one starts to think about those platters turning ..

Offline alanb

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Re: EEVblog #395 - World's Most Expensive Hard Drive Teardown
« Reply #56 on: December 18, 2012, 11:53:14 PM »
Quote
Kinda scary when one starts to think about those platters turning ..
The most scary part was the voice coil / actuator mechanism. I once met a service engineer who had lost three fingers on his right hand when a the voice coil was actuated with his hand in the way.

Offline pista24

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Re: EEVblog #395 - World's Most Expensive Hard Drive Teardown
« Reply #57 on: December 24, 2012, 06:35:49 AM »
Hi,

which videocam do you use to record this video? Especially macro mode for magnetic heads.

Thanks.

Offline SL4P

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Re: EEVblog #395 - World's Most Expensive Hard Drive Teardown
« Reply #58 on: April 01, 2014, 10:38:26 PM »
Around a decade before this drive, I was working on DEC hardware, and specifically the RK05 (2.5MB) and RL01/2 (5/10MB) drives attached to LSI-11 systems.
It's interesting to see the similarities and throwback concepts - but despite being built like battleships they were extremely fragile in transit and in use.
Don't underestimate the voice-coil positioners. They would seek sequential tracks in under 2mS, and to any track under 6mS with a LOT of force. The'd have your finger f it was in the way!.
A colleague had his flashy bling ring melted onto hois finger by shorting across the power supply to the positioner... !   An optical strip encoder provided the track position feedback to the positioning electronics.
The RL0x drives were a bit more friendly - higher data density / slightly slower seek speed, and used another strategy common back then - with one surface pre-formatted with index data (effectively hard sectored)

Great to have the memories brought up !


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