Author Topic: EEVblog #484 - Home Solar Power System Installation  (Read 19933 times)

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Offline EEVblog

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EEVblog #484 - Home Solar Power System Installation
« on: June 16, 2013, 10:17:09 AM »
Installing and initial testing of Dave's 3kW home solar power system. With Sunnyboy SMA inverter, 250W LG Mono-X solar panels, and net metering.

Data from the system is here: http://pvoutput.org/list.jsp?userid=22501

EEVblog #484 - Home Solar Power System Installation
« Last Edit: June 16, 2013, 08:05:22 PM by EEVblog »

Offline Eliminateur

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Re: EEVblog #484 - Home Solar Power System Installation
« Reply #1 on: June 16, 2013, 10:42:01 AM »
why do you have two power meters in the old installation?
ripple control, wth is that for?

Online Skimask

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Re: EEVblog #484 - Home Solar Power System Installation
« Reply #2 on: June 16, 2013, 11:41:34 AM »
Something I've never been able to grasp...

How does power get fed back into the grid?

Is it as simple as just generating one more volt than the grid has on it at that particular point in time (e.g. keeping everything in phase, etc.)?
Do you monkey with the phasing of the power you generate in relation to that of the phase of the power on the grid itself (e.g lead or lag an equal pk-pk voltage by x degrees)?

If all grids were DC, this would be a no-brainer, but it's not...
I didn't take it apart.
I turned it on.

The only stupid question is, well, most of them...

Save a fuse...Blow an electrician.

Online c4757p

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Re: EEVblog #484 - Home Solar Power System Installation
« Reply #3 on: June 16, 2013, 11:53:38 AM »
ripple control, wth is that for?

A higher-frequency ripple tone (1050 Hz IIRC) is injected into the mains to mark off-peak hours; that receives the signal and switches a water heater on or off accordingly.

Offline c6r1s

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Re: EEVblog #484 - Home Solar Power System Installation
« Reply #4 on: June 16, 2013, 12:07:11 PM »
Very nice indeed. I wonder could we modify to increase efficiency of Solar panels. What if we were to put a TEG system along the back of the panels and rails to generate excess DC to feed back into the inverter.? I mean if you harness more of the loses wouldn't that increase your DC feedback to save more money?

Offline cthree

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Re: EEVblog #484 - Home Solar Power System Installation
« Reply #5 on: June 16, 2013, 12:17:59 PM »
Amazing how much you pay and how little you get paid wtf. We pay $0.06-$0.12 and get paid $0.53 in Ontario Canada. Used to get paid $0.80 which was stupid so they stopped doing it. Something about encouraging solar generation investment or some such.

Offline Deagle

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Re: EEVblog #484 - Home Solar Power System Installation
« Reply #6 on: June 16, 2013, 12:28:34 PM »
Haha Dave, going through the installers toolbag  :-DD

Offline NiHaoMike

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Re: EEVblog #484 - Home Solar Power System Installation
« Reply #7 on: June 16, 2013, 01:53:14 PM »
Are you going to design some sort of controller to try to match the load to the supply at all times? I suppose the difficulty of actually doing that depends on the time resolution of the measurements.
Something I've never been able to grasp...

How does power get fed back into the grid?

Is it as simple as just generating one more volt than the grid has on it at that particular point in time (e.g. keeping everything in phase, etc.)?
Do you monkey with the phasing of the power you generate in relation to that of the phase of the power on the grid itself (e.g lead or lag an equal pk-pk voltage by x degrees)?

If all grids were DC, this would be a no-brainer, but it's not...
Just generate a waveform that is in phase with and slightly higher voltage than the mains. It's very similar to a synchronous motor drive.
Electrical engineering would be a lot more fun if I looked like Tiffany Yep. As if it's not fun enough already...

In power electronics, transistors should ideally be either fully on or fully off, because a half-on transistor just makes a really poor imitation of Tiffany Yep...

Online IanB

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Re: EEVblog #484 - Home Solar Power System Installation
« Reply #8 on: June 16, 2013, 02:07:59 PM »
When you run a generator feeding a grid you actually have to make the phase angle of the generator lead the grid by marginal amount. The generator will naturally try to synchronize with the grid, and the attempt of the generator to resist being driven out of phase relates to the power you have to feed into the generator to force it into the out of phase situation. The more power you feed into the generator the faster it tries to turn and the more the grid resists it. The generator pushing against the grid is how power gets transferred.
I'm not an EE--what am I doing here?

Offline Leon

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Re: EEVblog #484 - Home Solar Power System Installation
« Reply #9 on: June 16, 2013, 02:15:38 PM »
The SMA SB 21-series is fanless. The fan is an option, if you didn't order it you won't find it during a teardown.  ;)

Offline Hypernova

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Re: EEVblog #484 - Home Solar Power System Installation
« Reply #10 on: June 16, 2013, 02:43:57 PM »
Why are there no combined elec/water heating setups? You run pipe along the back of the panels to cool them and you get free hot water. Why is it that when ever I see a solar set up it's always either one but never both?

Online IanB

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Re: EEVblog #484 - Home Solar Power System Installation
« Reply #11 on: June 16, 2013, 02:52:01 PM »
I don't think you would get much hot water if most of the sun's energy is being converted to electricity. By energy balance you can get hot water or electricity, but not both at the same time. If you did run water cooling you would get low grade heat (lukewarm water only) and then you would need a heat pump to raise the water to a useful temperature. I doubt that the improved efficiency of the cooled panels would generate enough extra power to run the heat pump. Not to mention the considerably increased complexity and capital cost of the installation.
I'm not an EE--what am I doing here?

Offline Eliminateur

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Re: EEVblog #484 - Home Solar Power System Installation
« Reply #12 on: June 16, 2013, 03:10:37 PM »
panels should already include piping for that, and you run the water for your overhead water tanks that you have anyway so it doesn't matter if they get lukewarm only (or the downpipe from the tank to the house)

Offline Hypernova

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Re: EEVblog #484 - Home Solar Power System Installation
« Reply #13 on: June 16, 2013, 03:30:19 PM »
I don't think you would get much hot water if most of the sun's energy is being converted to electricity. By energy balance you can get hot water or electricity, but not both at the same time. If you did run water cooling you would get low grade heat (lukewarm water only) and then you would need a heat pump to raise the water to a useful temperature. I doubt that the improved efficiency of the cooled panels would generate enough extra power to run the heat pump. Not to mention the considerably increased complexity and capital cost of the installation.

The panels are not that efficient, most of the light is still turning into waste heat and the panels can get to 50+ degrees easily.
If you are already using electric based water heaters you already spend power on the heaters, so giving the heater warm water to start with will save power. Solar water heater installations are often augmented by electrical heaters already. What I'm proposing is free cooling for the panels and free preheating for the heaters.
« Last Edit: June 16, 2013, 03:33:24 PM by Hypernova »

Offline snoopy

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Re: EEVblog #484 - Home Solar Power System Installation
« Reply #14 on: June 16, 2013, 03:33:39 PM »
Something I've never been able to grasp...

How does power get fed back into the grid?

Is it as simple as just generating one more volt than the grid has on it at that particular point in time (e.g. keeping everything in phase, etc.)?
Do you monkey with the phasing of the power you generate in relation to that of the phase of the power on the grid itself (e.g lead or lag an equal pk-pk voltage by x degrees)?

If all grids were DC, this would be a no-brainer, but it's not...

Yes the inverter generates a sinewave with the same phase but with a higher voltage than the mains and it also has a high output impedance approaching current drive. If there are too many inverters on the grid it can drive the actual mains voltage too high and all inverters have an over voltage limit to shut them down when this happens. They also have a feature called anti-islanding which means that if the grid and mains fails the inverter will shut down thus making the grid safe.

regards
david


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