Author Topic: EEVblog #954 - How To Setup An Electronics Lab For $300  (Read 23453 times)

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Offline ez24

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Re: EEVblog #954 - How To Setup An Electronics Lab For $300
« Reply #50 on: December 12, 2016, 12:35:01 pm »
IMHO a low end soldering iron from an A-brand will be a good investment even if it means not getting the USB microscope and/or head magnifier.

So what A brand would you get?
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Offline Cliff Matthews

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Re: EEVblog #954 - How To Setup An Electronics Lab For $300
« Reply #51 on: December 12, 2016, 02:56:00 pm »
BigClive has the best info on low-end soldering stations yet, it's good to watch a smooth technique, and this guy's the real deal.
**At 12:00 he starts a total internal/external review of the low cost 936 soldering stations **


Personal defense dept: When traveling, I bet he sleeps with a soldering iron under his pillow..  :-DD
« Last Edit: December 12, 2016, 03:04:24 pm by Cliff Matthews »
 

Offline Smokey

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Re: EEVblog #954 - How To Setup An Electronics Lab For $300
« Reply #52 on: December 12, 2016, 03:26:35 pm »
Start with a project and build your lab around that.  At least come up with a list of stuff you want to be able to do and think about what is required for that before you start buying stuff.

Don't find out the cheap stuff you bought first isn't up to the task when you actually need to use it.
 

Online Fungus

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Re: EEVblog #954 - How To Setup An Electronics Lab For $300
« Reply #53 on: December 12, 2016, 04:25:24 pm »
Start with a project and build your lab around that.  At least come up with a list of stuff you want to be able to do and think about what is required for that before you start buying stuff.

Yep. I wouldn't have said a microscope is essential for a newbie. Magnifying glass, yes, but not microscope.

 

Offline Brumby

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Re: EEVblog #954 - How To Setup An Electronics Lab For $300
« Reply #54 on: December 12, 2016, 05:27:08 pm »
Whatever you get in the way of magnification, make sure it is NOT hand held.  Hands-on electronics requires 3 hands a lot of the time, which is doable.  Finding a fourth hand will be a challenge.
 

Offline julian1

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Re: EEVblog #954 - How To Setup An Electronics Lab For $300
« Reply #55 on: December 12, 2016, 08:01:17 pm »
A transistor-tester is good value at $15AU. measure caps and inductors, and identify the pinouts and basic parameters of bjts, diodes, mosfets and - importantly if they're still working after being wired up incorrectly and after accidental over-current or ESD.  It also helps free up the multi-meter for some tasks, so the meter can remain hooked up to a circuit.

I really like seeing the signal-generator mentioned. Everyone has an intuition about what an oscilloscope does - measure signals in the time-domain. But sig-gens kind of need to be demystified since they're so damn useful.

Offline jonovid

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Re: EEVblog #954 - How To Setup An Electronics Lab For $300
« Reply #56 on: December 12, 2016, 08:06:43 pm »
Quote
Whatever you get in the way of magnification, make sure it is NOT hand held.  Hands-on electronics requires 3 hands a lot of the time, which is doable.  Finding a fourth hand will be a challenge.
if you can find one? for under $25 . cheap goose-neck magnifying glass with 18 warm white LED's gives binocular vision
cheap goose-neck magnifying glass yes it is made with glass. & has 18 warm white LEDs gives true 2X stereoscopic binocular vision and its also cheap at $25AU . went out and got a second unit in 2015. their that good to use.  kids love em.
optimum binocular focus is at 180mm , 100mm from the lens to the work.  unfortunately some of the LED's are now failing in 2016. as the 5volt at 800ma plug-pack drive is too high. so I added a diode as an inline voltage droper.   note- avoid magnifying plastic lenses,  the first clean of a plastic lens will scratch it.   I do not like Cold bluey white LED's.

http://www.hobbysew.com.au/lighting/led-lights/triumph/led-desktop-magnifying-lamp.aspx
the new 2016 lamp model is not so cheap.  au dollar exchange rate in 2016

most of the white framed glass lens magnifyers with a ring of 18 or more LED's are not cheap. as their made for dermatology work.
IMO you need minimum of 8 or more LED's in your magnifying glass ring for electronics work.

cheap $20AU USB microscope is for SMD type work, and image capture. but I also use the big magnifying glass too.

cheap $8 all in one component tester is also a must IMO   then add some leads to it.
« Last Edit: December 13, 2016, 12:34:46 am by jonovid »
Hobby of evil genius      basic knowledge of electronics
 

Online mikeselectricstuff

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Re: EEVblog #954 - How To Setup An Electronics Lab For $300
« Reply #57 on: December 12, 2016, 08:48:58 pm »
Start with a project and build your lab around that.  At least come up with a list of stuff you want to be able to do and think about what is required for that before you start buying stuff.

Yep. I wouldn't have said a microscope is essential for a newbie. Magnifying glass, yes, but not microscope.
Depends a lot on how good your eyesight is. many years ago I used to be able to rework a 0.5mm QFP with nothing more than a bright bench light but nowadays need magnification for most SMD work. I've yet to find a decent head-mounted magnifier ( for use when I'm not near a Mantis) - the few I've tried so far either have too much magnification or unsuitable working distance/FOV.
 
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Offline mikerj

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Re: EEVblog #954 - How To Setup An Electronics Lab For $300
« Reply #58 on: December 12, 2016, 09:48:37 pm »
Depends a lot on how good your eyesight is. many years ago I used to be able to rework a 0.5mm QFP with nothing more than a bright bench light but nowadays need magnification for most SMD work.

I've been shorted sighted from a young age and used to be able to focus down to very short distances; I could even read a book that was pressed against the end of my nose.  Very handy when working on small stuff and I always wondered why other people needed magnifiers and microscopes.  30 years later I understand :)
 

Offline NANDBlog

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Re: EEVblog #954 - How To Setup An Electronics Lab For $300
« Reply #59 on: December 12, 2016, 11:28:48 pm »
I would add a few cheap items:
Two scalpel for cutting PCB traces and plastic.
Wire stripper
Flux in a syringe
10W resistors, a few pieces, few value between 1-100 Ohm.
crocodiles, bananas, snakes, wires
Fire extinguisher and first aid kit. No I'm not kidding.
 

Online mikeselectricstuff

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Re: EEVblog #954 - How To Setup An Electronics Lab For $300
« Reply #60 on: December 12, 2016, 11:34:42 pm »
If you're on a very fixed budget, then the most important thing after the basics is to leave spare cash for stuff you find you need once you start doing things.

An easily  positonable bench light is also essential - this IKEA one is good:. http://www.ikea.com/gb/en/products/lighting/work-lamps/jansj%C3%B6-led-work-lamp-black-art-00169659/
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Online nctnico

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Re: EEVblog #954 - How To Setup An Electronics Lab For $300
« Reply #61 on: December 12, 2016, 11:37:14 pm »
IMHO a low end soldering iron from an A-brand will be a good investment even if it means not getting the USB microscope and/or head magnifier.
So what A brand would you get?
Over here Ersa is easy to get and according to my experience better than Weller and JBC but either way it will take a major part of the budget. Then again: without a good soldering iron you can't really do anything with electronics.

Regarding lighting and magnification: a magnifier lamp provides both but you'll need to get one with a lense of 5 diopter.
« Last Edit: December 12, 2016, 11:40:03 pm by nctnico »
There are small lies, big lies and then there is what is on the screen of your oscilloscope.
 
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Offline fubar.gr

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Re: EEVblog #954 - How To Setup An Electronics Lab For $300
« Reply #62 on: December 13, 2016, 01:55:04 am »
It is my impression that all those Hakko clone soldering stations have picked up in price. Some time ago you could find them on ebay for $15-25, but nowadays the sell for around $40 or more.

Online mtdoc

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Re: EEVblog #954 - How To Setup An Electronics Lab For $300
« Reply #63 on: December 13, 2016, 02:56:59 am »
It is my impression that all those Hakko clone soldering stations have picked up in price. Some time ago you could find them on ebay for $15-25, but nowadays the sell for around $40 or more.

$18 + $9 shipping from Hobbyking in the US.
 

Online dardosordi

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Re: EEVblog #954 - How To Setup An Electronics Lab For $300
« Reply #64 on: December 13, 2016, 04:27:10 am »
I just realized: I want a purple multimeter!

At first I was like  :palm: but then it kinda grew on me.

I really want one now! Please Dave, have the eevblog dmm (the next one) with holster color options!
 

Offline fubar.gr

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Re: EEVblog #954 - How To Setup An Electronics Lab For $300
« Reply #65 on: December 13, 2016, 04:28:01 am »
It is my impression that all those Hakko clone soldering stations have picked up in price. Some time ago you could find them on ebay for $15-25, but nowadays the sell for around $40 or more.

$18 + $9 shipping from Hobbyking in the US.

You can't find it at this price at the usual places like ebay or banggood.

Actually it is quite hard to find any 936 clone at all nowadays, and the few sellers that still stock it will sell it at $40+

Looks like the new cheap station of the month is this one: http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/908-220V-60W-Electric-Soldering-Station-Iron-Thermostat-for-SMT-SMD-Weld-New-/122238761140?hash=item1c75ff78b4:g:Yj8AAOSwXeJYNVZY


Offline PA4TIM

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Re: EEVblog #954 - How To Setup An Electronics Lab For $300
« Reply #66 on: December 13, 2016, 04:35:31 am »
I prefer blue DMMs  (ifI would care for the color :-) )

10 years ago I almost never used a magnifier, not strange because I was younger and heavy addicted to tubes. Today I do a lot of SMD and at 53 my eyes are not the best anymore and I use a Velleman magnifier


I use if for 2 years now on a daily base for my work. I removed the extra magnifier because it was always flapping around in the breeze.  The spring from the second internal lens is disappeared but easy solved with a piece of wire. Most times I have both lenses down so no problem. I glued a piece of foam at the front of the headband. It works very well. The optical quality is decent enough (and I'm critical at that point)

I miss one thing in the list, invest in knowledge. It will cost you mostly time (and buy the art of electronics)

I started with an old analog 10 MHz scope and an old Fluke 77-III. I then made a powersupply with a LM317 and a LM337. A bit later I bought a second hand function generator and a griddipper (i used that a lot) There is one big advantage for having a sound electronics knowledge base, you can repair stuff and that is handy because broken test gear is cheap, often even for free.

Buy gear when you need it, you do not have to buy everything at once and you can build instruments too. Besides the PSU(s), I builded a lot more, started with easy kits and later things became more complicated and often my own design, You can build things like L meter, C meter, counter, RF generators (upto 2GHz but the first was upto 15 MHz and very simple), powermeters, 2 spectrum analysers, a poor man "network analyser" , ESR meters etc.
OK, today you can buy stuff for almost nothing in China but you learn a lot more from building your own stuff.

About the sidecutters, I started with a cheapy, then bought a 30 euro knippex. I used that for 5 years until it became to bad to use. I never really liked it. I do not like cheap tools but I will never buy an expensive side cutter again.
I took my cheapy, removed the plastic grips, it was rather soft iron so I could use some force to make the beaks parallel. Then made the jaws ultraflat and very sharp , heated the beaks redhot and then dipped it in oil. Now the steel is a lot harder and it cuts like a dream. I made new grips from a thick rubber hose.

About soldering, after a few years and several cheap irons and station(a red weller)  I bought a WS81 Weller solderstation, never regretted that. Wish I bought that instead of waisting money on the cheap junk.

www.pa4tim.nl my collection measurement gear and experiments Also lots of info about network analyse
www.schneiderelectronicsrepair.nl  repair of test and calibration equipment
http://www.youtube.com/user/pa4tim my youtube channel
 
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Online mtdoc

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Re: EEVblog #954 - How To Setup An Electronics Lab For $300
« Reply #67 on: December 13, 2016, 04:37:49 am »
It is my impression that all those Hakko clone soldering stations have picked up in price. Some time ago you could find them on ebay for $15-25, but nowadays the sell for around $40 or more.

$18 + $9 shipping from Hobbyking in the US.

You can't find it at this price at the usual places like ebay or banggood.

Yep, which is probably why Dave said to buy it from Hobbyking - which IME provides better service and much faster shipping than the typical Chinese eBay seller or Banggood, Aliexpress, etc
 
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Online Fungus

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Re: EEVblog #954 - How To Setup An Electronics Lab For $300
« Reply #68 on: December 13, 2016, 07:00:46 am »
It is my impression that all those Hakko clone soldering stations have picked up in price. Some time ago you could find them on ebay for $15-25, but nowadays the sell for around $40 or more.
You can't find it at this price at the usual places like ebay or banggood.

Actually it is quite hard to find any 936 clone at all nowadays, and the few sellers that still stock it will sell it at $40+

Not really surprising with that huge transformer in it. Just the shipping costs will kill any profit margin.


Looks like the new cheap station of the month is this one:

Switch mode supply? Much more sensible.
 

Online ErikTheNorwegian

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Re: EEVblog #954 - How To Setup An Electronics Lab For $300
« Reply #69 on: December 13, 2016, 08:51:47 am »
What would be realy nice, is if there is a Chinese dealer that pick up the idea to make a kit of all this and made a real good price for a complete cheap lab setup based upon Daves video...
 

Offline ez24

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Re: EEVblog #954 - How To Setup An Electronics Lab For $300
« Reply #70 on: December 13, 2016, 08:55:32 am »
It is my impression that all those Hakko clone soldering stations have picked up in price. Some time ago you could find them on ebay for $15-25, but nowadays the sell for around $40 or more.

$18 + $9 shipping from Hobbyking in the US.

Is this the same thing, I have this in my cart waiting to push the button - for me $24 total

https://www.amazon.com/YiHUA-936-Adjustable-Constant-Temperature-Soldering/dp/B01N8TVTN0/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&qid=1481410166&sr=8-7&keywords=936+soldering+station&linkCode=sl1&tag=ee04-20&linkId=0315a6f7cfa128cb1650d22fee39450a

YouTube and Website Electronic Resources ------>  http://www.eevblog.com/forum/other-blog-specific/a/msg1341166/#msg1341166
 
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Offline ez24

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Re: EEVblog #954 - How To Setup An Electronics Lab For $300
« Reply #71 on: December 13, 2016, 09:00:23 am »



Have you posted this picture on the "pictures of your work bench" thread ? 
YouTube and Website Electronic Resources ------>  http://www.eevblog.com/forum/other-blog-specific/a/msg1341166/#msg1341166
 
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Online mtdoc

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Re: EEVblog #954 - How To Setup An Electronics Lab For $300
« Reply #72 on: December 13, 2016, 09:30:03 am »
It is my impression that all those Hakko clone soldering stations have picked up in price. Some time ago you could find them on ebay for $15-25, but nowadays the sell for around $40 or more.

$18 + $9 shipping from Hobbyking in the US.

Is this the same thing, I have this in my cart waiting to push the button - for me $24 total

https://www.amazon.com/YiHUA-936-Adjustable-Constant-Temperature-Soldering/dp/B01N8TVTN0/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&qid=1481410166&sr=8-7&keywords=936+soldering+station&linkCode=sl1&tag=ee04-20&linkId=0315a6f7cfa128cb1650d22fee39450a

Yeah it looks the same to me.  $24 with free shipping on Amazon. Hard to beat that -even if it is a Hakko clone. Nice find!
 

Online Fungus

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Re: EEVblog #954 - How To Setup An Electronics Lab For $300
« Reply #73 on: December 13, 2016, 09:09:59 pm »
Have you posted this picture on the "pictures of your work bench" thread ?

Where does the actual "work" part happen?

 

Offline fubar.gr

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Re: EEVblog #954 - How To Setup An Electronics Lab For $300
« Reply #74 on: December 14, 2016, 12:41:46 am »
Regarding sidecutters:

A side cutter is a precision tool that requires good care, no matter how good quality, or how expensive it is.

It should only be used on "soft" materials, like copper, tinned copper and the like. It also shouldn't be used on wires above a certain thickness.

The aforementioned Plato 170 has a 1mm diameter limit.

I personally have 2 or 3 of those Plato cutters for cutting and stripping thin wires, but I also have some el-cheapo Chinese cutters for all other uses.


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