Author Topic: 3D Printers  (Read 859 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline paulca

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 1714
  • Country: gb
3D Printers
« on: March 14, 2018, 01:37:44 am »
So I gather from elsewhere that the Prusa i3 mk8 is the defacto printer to have.

Clones are available for as little as £100.  However I gather that such a cheap clone will probably work, but barely and parts will need upgraded/replaced/tweaked and modified.

Does anyone have any experience with better quality clones?  I believe the genuine offical brand Prusa is circa £500-600.
"What could possibly go wrong?"
Current Open Projects:  3 Channel Audio mixer with DAC, BT, pre-amps and h/phone amp, WS281x LED controller Version 2 5V/5A w/Atmega328, FY6600 Power supply, 5A DC Load (Still!)
 

Online NiHaoMike

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 4621
  • Country: us
  • "Don't turn it on - Take it apart!"
    • Facebook Page
Re: 3D Printers
« Reply #1 on: March 14, 2018, 01:53:30 am »
Any "mk8" is definitely a fake. The official latest is mk3. If that's too much for a first printer, they recommend CR10 or Monoprice.
Cryptocurrency has taught me to love math and at the same time be baffled by it.

Cryptocurrency lesson 0: Altcoins and Bitcoin are not the same thing.
 

Offline Ampera

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 2226
  • Country: us
Re: 3D Printers
« Reply #2 on: March 14, 2018, 02:01:59 am »
My printer was about 350 bucks, but a gift (I have a nice grandfather). It's an XYZPrinting Da Vinci Jr 1.0 Pro (boardroom monkeys really had a fricking ball with THAT name). It's actually a fairly decent printer, of which I have 0 reference to, as it's the first and only 3D printer I have ever had any real contact with.

I'd question anything that costs 100 pounds. I'd expect support to be BAD, software to straight up not work, and the thing to have ditch bank build quality. The big price afaik are the stepper motors, as well as all the tracks and mechanical frameage.

There's the old addage you get what you pay for. This, applies to 3D printers as it does everything.
C Programmer, Legacy hardware enthusiast, perpetually off-his-rocker madman.
If it's broken, I probably did it.
 

Offline hagster

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 275
Re: 3D Printers
« Reply #3 on: March 14, 2018, 02:27:55 am »
The genuine Joe Prusa Mk2s or MK3 are fine printers by all accounts. Definitely worth the money.

To my knowledge ALL £100 printers are trash so far.

There is a whole bunch of machines in the £300 bracket that work really well, albeit without some of the great extra features and top end hardware as the Prusa. Actual price a bit with build volume(mainly though shipping costs)

These include machines like the Creality CR10s, Tevo Tornado, JGAurura A3/A5.

My advice is not to buy anything unless there is a good review from a reputable YouTuber. e.g Toms3DP , MakersMuse, 3dPrintingNerd etc etc.
 

Offline Yellofriend

  • Regular Contributor
  • *
  • Posts: 96
  • Country: hk
Re: 3D Printers
« Reply #4 on: March 14, 2018, 12:19:26 pm »
If money is an issue you can follow Toms "Dolly", were he tries to build the cheapest possible Prusa i3 MK2 (which is even after the MK3 is out a wonderful printer)

https://toms3d.org/2017/02/23/building-cheapest-possible-prusa-i3-mk2/

I would probably build exactly that, but with an authentic E3D all-metal hotend and TMC2130 drivers
--------------
TVM802C with 2.23Beta2
T962A
 
The following users thanked this post: wilfred

Offline cloudscapes

  • Regular Contributor
  • *
  • Posts: 195
Re: 3D Printers
« Reply #5 on: March 15, 2018, 10:06:55 am »
The i3 MK2S/MK3's are great printers in good part because they use top quality parts. Getting a clone of an i3 defeats that, in my opinion. the design might be similar, but the individual components will fail, will self-calibrate poorly, or have poor tolerances. do clones even self-calibrate?

i3 clones worth getting are probably really close to the cost of an original.

I own an MK2S.
« Last Edit: March 15, 2018, 10:10:24 am by cloudscapes »
 

Online ANTALIFE

  • Regular Contributor
  • *
  • Posts: 215
  • Country: au
  • ( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)
    • Muh Blog
Re: 3D Printers
« Reply #6 on: March 15, 2018, 10:11:44 am »
I had a Markerfarm Prusa i3v for 2 years, and have just placed an order for a Prusa i3 MK3. Finally will have automatic bed leveling.

My recommendation is to go with the MK3 (from Prusa Research) as it will make your printing experience much better, there is a big company and an even bigger community behind the printer so solving problems will be fairly easy :D

Online doobedoobedo

  • Regular Contributor
  • *
  • Posts: 193
  • Country: gb
Re: 3D Printers
« Reply #7 on: March 15, 2018, 11:12:54 am »
I have a cheap clone (Anet A8). It wasn't too terrible out of the box, but I've had to upgrade it quite a bit, fortunately you can print out most of the upgrade parts yourself from thingiverse, and things like decent belts to replace the crap that it comes with are pretty cheap.

If you don't mind tinkering I'd say it was worth it, even if it's just for how much you learn. If you want something you don't need to tinker with, don't bother, get the original.

If I was to get another printer I'd now have the confidence to build something like this by tech2c:
 

Offline paulca

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 1714
  • Country: gb
Re: 3D Printers
« Reply #8 on: March 16, 2018, 03:17:30 am »
My recommendation is to go with the MK3 (from Prusa Research) as it will make your printing experience much better, there is a big company and an even bigger community behind the printer so solving problems will be fairly easy :D

It's the cost is the issue.  If a 3D printer costs £500-600 then I will not have a 3D printer period.

However what interests me in the Prusa design is it's scope and eco-system.  Availability of parts, knowledge, support etc.  Which is why I was considering a clone.

About 10 year ago I got into RC Helicopters.  When I wanted to move up to a "proper" collective pitch, 3D heli, I choose an Align TRex clone.  I then spent quite a bit of time upgrading parts with either better clone parts or genuine Align parts until I had a heli I liked.... then I crashed it.  Built another, crashed it.  got bored.

I was thinking of going the same way with a 3D printer, but I started the thread to figure out if there were better clones than the rock bottom £100 ones.  Maybe one at £150, or £200 that addresses most of the issues with the really cheap ones but doesn't cost the full £500-600.
"What could possibly go wrong?"
Current Open Projects:  3 Channel Audio mixer with DAC, BT, pre-amps and h/phone amp, WS281x LED controller Version 2 5V/5A w/Atmega328, FY6600 Power supply, 5A DC Load (Still!)
 

Offline jasonbrent

  • Regular Contributor
  • *
  • Posts: 171
Re: 3D Printers
« Reply #9 on: March 16, 2018, 03:24:57 am »
I have a it-was-a-CR-10 that I picked up for $340 USD shipped via gearbest.com over the holidays. I've done numerous upgrades (really wasn't needed, just enjoy tinkering)... it's a great printer for the price point. 3D printing definitely is not a "set it and forget it" thing... constant tinkering seems to be required in terms of hardware/software(slicers)... it's fascinating to see what was a roll of plastic turn into something useful over the course of a few hours though. :)
 

Online ANTALIFE

  • Regular Contributor
  • *
  • Posts: 215
  • Country: au
  • ( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)
    • Muh Blog
Re: 3D Printers
« Reply #10 on: March 16, 2018, 07:12:44 am »
My recommendation is to go with the MK3 (from Prusa Research) as it will make your printing experience much better, there is a big company and an even bigger community behind the printer so solving problems will be fairly easy :D

It's the cost is the issue.  If a 3D printer costs £500-600 then I will not have a 3D printer period.

However what interests me in the Prusa design is it's scope and eco-system.  Availability of parts, knowledge, support etc.  Which is why I was considering a clone.

About 10 year ago I got into RC Helicopters.  When I wanted to move up to a "proper" collective pitch, 3D heli, I choose an Align TRex clone.  I then spent quite a bit of time upgrading parts with either better clone parts or genuine Align parts until I had a heli I liked.... then I crashed it.  Built another, crashed it.  got bored.

I was thinking of going the same way with a 3D printer, but I started the thread to figure out if there were better clones than the rock bottom £100 ones.  Maybe one at £150, or £200 that addresses most of the issues with the really cheap ones but doesn't cost the full £500-600.


Rightio. Looks like you will have to find the right balance then, save max money by getting a cheap clone, or be prepared to spend lots of time debugging the printer when it does not work like you want it to.

r/3Dprinting has a good monthly thread on printer recommendations, have a look there:
https://www.reddit.com/r/3Dprinting/comments/813q30/3d_printing_purchase_advice_megathread_what/

Offline Yellofriend

  • Regular Contributor
  • *
  • Posts: 96
  • Country: hk
Re: 3D Printers
« Reply #11 on: March 16, 2018, 05:44:06 pm »
If money is a huge issue and you just want to play around a little to check if 3D printing is your thing you c an try the Creality Ender 2.

It has very good feedback and good community support. With some discount codes you can buy it on Gearbest for below US$170
--------------
TVM802C with 2.23Beta2
T962A
 

Online Brumby

  • Supporter
  • ****
  • Posts: 7870
  • Country: au
Re: 3D Printers
« Reply #12 on: August 26, 2018, 10:43:54 pm »
I've been visiting the idea of a 3D printer on and off for a while now.  I've followed a few video bloggers to get an idea of issues, features and potential frustration and I've gravitated towards a position that is basically identical to this (especially with a few things already sitting in the garage):

... you can follow Toms "Dolly", were he tries to build the cheapest possible Prusa i3 MK2 (which is even after the MK3 is out a wonderful printer)

https://toms3d.org/2017/02/23/building-cheapest-possible-prusa-i3-mk2/

I would probably build exactly that, but with an authentic E3D all-metal hotend and TMC2130 drivers

Getting involved with the mechanics and geometry really appeals to me and with the prices of parts being so ridiculously low, the financial risk versus the learning experience comes in a winner.

The only question I have is: Where do you get the 3D printed parts set for Tom's Dolly clone (around Sydney)?  While I might be up for a challenge, I'm not that keen to take it on without them.
« Last Edit: August 27, 2018, 12:11:54 am by Brumby »
 


Share me

Digg  Facebook  SlashDot  Delicious  Technorati  Twitter  Google  Yahoo
Smf