Poll

Do you calibrate and periodically check the temperature of your soldering station iron?

Yes, I only calibrated it once it its lifetime
8 (9.1%)
No, I've never calibrated it and use it as is, out of the box
55 (62.5%)
Yes, I calibrate it and check the accuracy periodically
7 (8%)
No, I've never calibrated it and and have never rechecked it
13 (14.8%)
I don't need calibration, my iron and station are self calibrating
5 (5.7%)

Total Members Voted: 84

Author Topic: Do you calibrate your soldering station, if not or if so, why?  (Read 27007 times)

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Offline saturation

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Re: Do you calibrate your soldering station, if not or if so, why?
« Reply #25 on: August 10, 2011, 11:28:08 pm »
Here is the eBay Hakko 191 guts, its very likely counterfeit.  A give away is if the date code on the PCB is correct, it was made in 2/11 and this product was discontinued by Hakko in 2006.  There is no Hakko marks anywhere.

As you see, its fairly simple internally, and the thermocouple wires are simply connected between red and blue.  The third wire is probably just mechanical support.  However, for $10, building this yourself from a kit and carving the box will cost more than $10, plus paying $20 for real Hakko sensors or $5 for fake ones.





Looks real enough, but I've never seen the true version:



Copy?  Down to serial numbers and Made in Japan:

« Last Edit: August 10, 2011, 11:30:54 pm by saturation »
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 Saturation
 

Offline IanB

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Re: Do you calibrate your soldering station, if not or if so, why?
« Reply #26 on: August 11, 2011, 06:22:01 am »
I love my 15w and 25w Antex. Unfortunately the PVC cable is too stiff, I believe the silicon wire is more flexible.
I have an Antex XS 25W, but I don't find it very good compared to my new Hakko FX-888. The tip temperature of the Antex seems to be about 425°C, which I think is too hot for most purposes. It burns flux and causes the solder on the tip to form a dull oxide layer. Secondly the plastic handle becomes uncomfortably warm if you leave the iron in the stand while switched on. Thirdly the tip takes a significant time (over a minute) to reach operating temperature. Fourthly the cable is a bit stiff and inflexible as you mention.
I'm not an EE--what am I doing here?
 

Offline saturation

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Re: Do you calibrate your soldering station, if not or if so, why?
« Reply #27 on: August 12, 2011, 12:06:48 am »
Interesting tip thermometer clones:

Pace 8001-0087-P1 Tip thermometer, $400  ::):



Others :



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 Saturation
 

Online Fraser

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Re: Do you calibrate your soldering station, if not or if so, why?
« Reply #28 on: August 12, 2011, 03:26:18 am »
You have to wonder whether the HAKKO units were actually built by a 3rd party, and that party now continues to sell it under many brand names. I personally can't see PACE selling a 'rip-off' product but I can see them placing a big price tag on a product that is available to them under contract. The fact that the case design has remained unchanged through the various available units seems to point to one factory for production.
 

Offline saturation

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Re: Do you calibrate your soldering station, if not or if so, why?
« Reply #29 on: August 12, 2011, 05:16:33 am »
Yes, it looks suspiciously like that, its probable why Hakko redesign the device as the FG-100, which does the exact same thing but simply looks different, it even has the same list price as the 191.


You have to wonder whether the HAKKO units were actually built by a 3rd party, and that party now continues to sell it under many brand names. I personally can't see PACE selling a 'rip-off' product but I can see them placing a big price tag on a product that is available to them under contract. The fact that the case design has remained unchanged through the various available units seems to point to one factory for production.
Best Wishes,

 Saturation
 

Offline nukie

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Re: Do you calibrate your soldering station, if not or if so, why?
« Reply #30 on: August 12, 2011, 08:59:15 am »
I might just buy a couple and modify it to accept regular k type thermocouple and use it as a thermometer.
 

Offline SiBurning

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Re: Do you calibrate your soldering station, if not or if so, why?
« Reply #31 on: September 18, 2011, 02:43:29 am »
Yes, it looks suspiciously like that, its probable why Hakko redesign the device as the FG-100, which does the exact same thing but simply looks different, it even has the same list price as the 191.
They're not exactly the same. According to the documentation, the newer 100 needs to be sent back to Hakko for calibration, while the older 191 version could be calibrated by the user. The actual difference might be nothing more than setting a trim pot--i.e. it could be a change in company policy rather than a technical requirement.
 

Offline saturation

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Re: Do you calibrate your soldering station, if not or if so, why?
« Reply #32 on: September 29, 2011, 11:46:10 pm »
Thanks Si for the correction, methinks it uses a uC now so the adjustments are made using set constants kept in memory, and makes for more problems with DIY service.  Alas, I prefer the easier to DIY service analog thermometer, its so basic a device even the clones are likely accurate.

Yes, it looks suspiciously like that, its probable why Hakko redesign the device as the FG-100, which does the exact same thing but simply looks different, it even has the same list price as the 191.
They're not exactly the same. According to the documentation, the newer 100 needs to be sent back to Hakko for calibration, while the older 191 version could be calibrated by the user. The actual difference might be nothing more than setting a trim pot--i.e. it could be a change in company policy rather than a technical requirement.
Best Wishes,

 Saturation
 


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