Author Topic: Duracell battery leak  (Read 6161 times)

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Offline saturation

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Re: Duracell battery leak
« Reply #15 on: September 27, 2011, 02:49:10 AM »
As an side, since the leak is rich in K-0H, a spritz of vinegar will neturalize it and help clean out the contaminants.
Best Wishes,


Saturation

Offline bilko

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Re: Duracell battery leak
« Reply #16 on: September 27, 2011, 05:11:47 AM »
As an side, since the leak is rich in K-0H, a spritz of vinegar will neturalize it and help clean out the contaminants.
Thanks for the tip.

I have bought equipment with GP batteries pre-installed, never had a problem with these either. So anybody know why expensive Duracell batteries leak and most cheap Chinese ones don't ?

Offline ErikTheNorwegian

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Re: Duracell battery leak
« Reply #17 on: September 27, 2011, 05:31:36 AM »
What could, be the case, is that there are a LOT of fake duracell batteries around. I bought some batteries for my dive light in Egyptsome years ago, looked like Panasonic batteries, but was indeed Panasoanic !!
It became a night dive in tru words..


From. http://www.southwark.gov.uk/info/200098/trading_standards/1777/anti-counterfeiting/4

Fake Duracell battery alert

Consumers are advised to beware bargain Duracell batteries as inferior counterfeits are still being found on sale in the borough.

The nationwide problem has been ongoing for some years now and we have seized over 2,500 batteries from small independent shops and market stalls. The problem is often caused by retailers buying their stock from casual street hawkers with no paperwork.

Only four packs of AA and AAA size batteries are affected. The fakes perform very poorly and often leak, possibly ruining the products they are supposed to be powering and potentially causing acid burns to the skin.

The easiest way of checking what you have is to examine the cardboard outer packaging. On fakes the front and back are poorly stuck together and comes apart easily. Genuine products will have a grey/brown recyclable card construction whereas the fakes use white card.

Anyone who believes they may have bought counterfeit batteries should return them to the place where they bought them for a refund and to contact Trading Standards.

Retailers are advised to remove and re-cycle any counterfeits immediately as dealing in them is a serious offence under the Trade Marks Act. Battery re-cycling facilities are available at Manor Place depot. They are also advised to only buy stock from reputable established wholesalers as buying from other sources increases the chance that the goods sold will be fakes.

and from the  Washington Post

"Counterfeits often have blurred or ripped labels; product names misspelled; contents, color, smell or packaging wrong. Trainer says he saw counterfeit Duracell batteries for sale at local supermarkets and drugstores recently. He turned the package over, he said, "and the word 'China' was misspelled.""
« Last Edit: September 27, 2011, 05:35:42 AM by ErikTheNorwegian »
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Offline IanB

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Re: Duracell battery leak
« Reply #18 on: September 27, 2011, 06:03:52 AM »
I have bought equipment with GP batteries pre-installed, never had a problem with these either. So anybody know why expensive Duracell batteries leak and most cheap Chinese ones don't ?
Well, first you need to understand why alkaline batteries leak. Leaking most commonly occurs when gas bubbles are generated inside the battery, raising the internal pressure and forcing the electrolyte out through the seals. Alkaline battery designers are aware of this, and from the beginning they included components to absorb the gas and prevent it building up.

Next you need to understand what the marketing folks think drives sales, which is power. The design of a battery is a balance between various factors like shelf life, capacity, resistance to gas formation, manufacturing cost and power output. It happens that there is only so much room inside the casing of the battery and if you want to get more power to satisfy the marketing folks you have to sacrifice other things. One of the things to get sacrificed is protection against gas bubbles. So a side effect of high power formulations is a greater tendency to gas formation and therefore a greater tendency to leakage.

Ironically, therefore, you have the situation that the cheaper, ordinary alkaline battery formulations based on traditional technology are often less likely to leak than the expensive, proprietary, high power formulations.
« Last Edit: September 27, 2011, 02:14:17 PM by IanB »
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Offline Conrad Hoffman

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Re: Duracell battery leak
« Reply #19 on: September 27, 2011, 01:56:24 PM »
To add to what IanB says, the nature and construction of an alkaline battery makes it more likely to leak, especially if you let it go dead. Doesn't matter who makes it, dead alkalines will destroy whatever you put them in. Unless you need the peak current capability, there is no good reason to use alkalines. If the device doesn't have a motor and doesn't run the battery down in a day or two, or is used intermittently, use plain heavy duty batteries. The chance of leakage is far less and you'll save money. At low current draw there isn't that much difference in total available energy, at least not enough to offset the cost. If you pay a lot of money for a brand name, you'll get a brand name, but the battery won't be much better. It could be worse. I think the alkalines do perform better in the cold for weather stations and such, but you might also check into lithiums.

Offline BravoV

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Re: Duracell battery leak
« Reply #20 on: September 27, 2011, 02:27:58 PM »
When at the field, especially quite remote one, sometimes shit happened, and you don't have the luxury on choosing what kind of battery you like, and you just had to live with the option that was available there, such as crappy replacement battery.

Just curious at the leaked fluid, since its corrosive, I'm thinking if the battery's compartment is designed and made totally shielded/leak proof at least into the internal circuit, while the terminal is made from say gold plated or other metal that won't get corroded by that particular alkaline leaked fluid/acid, will this solve this kind of problem ?

I'm no expert on this chemistry thing, say we ignore the discussion on cost for that kind of terminal and compartment, just wondering if it is possible solution for leaked alkaline ? Cause all we need is just clean up the compartment and maybe few wetted wipes on the left over residue at the terminal, then its good to go again like new.
« Last Edit: September 27, 2011, 02:30:55 PM by BravoV »

Offline IanB

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Re: Duracell battery leak
« Reply #21 on: September 27, 2011, 02:38:10 PM »
Just curious at the leaked fluid, since its corrosive, I'm thinking if the battery's compartment is designed and made totally shielded/leak proof at least into the internal circuit, while the terminal is made from say gold plated or other metal that won't get corroded by that particular alkaline leaked fluid/acid, will this solve this kind of problem ?

I'm no expert on this chemistry thing, say we ignore the discussion on cost for that kind of terminal and compartment, just wondering if it is possible solution for leaked alkaline ? Cause all we need is just clean up the compartment and maybe few wetted wipes on the left over residue at the terminal, then its good to go again like new.
The leaked fluid is mainly potassium hydroxide, which is fairly corrosive to many metals and also human skin. In particular it will eat aluminium voraciously, which is bad for metal flashlight tubes. I think stainless steel might be one of the better choices for resisting corrosion, but expensive of course. The leaked stuff will eventually react with carbon dioxide in the air to make a dry white powder that sticks hard. Simple wet wipes won't work all that well, but vinegar as mentioned above will help.
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Offline BravoV

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Re: Duracell battery leak
« Reply #22 on: September 27, 2011, 03:00:30 PM »
The leaked fluid is mainly potassium hydroxide, which is fairly corrosive to many metals and also human skin. In particular it will eat aluminium voraciously, which is bad for metal flashlight tubes. I think stainless steel might be one of the better choices for resisting corrosion, but expensive of course. The leaked stuff will eventually react with carbon dioxide in the air to make a dry white powder that sticks hard. Simple wet wipes won't work all that well, but vinegar as mentioned above will help.

From experience, its obvious that the fluid will never eat the plastic surface like the compartment, a few bumps or scrap over the residue at the plastic surface usually is adequate to clean it up, while at terminals, as long they never get corroded chemically, I think using screw driver or sharp cutter to scrap and scratch out those stuck residue at the contact point should be enough. Of course better or complete clean up can be done later in the right environment. Btw, I'm talking about tough and harsh environment for portable instrument here.

I would say it possible to design such thing especially for expensive hand held instrument where the batteries usually installed in parallel that is easier to clean up than the tube style like in the flashlight.

« Last Edit: September 27, 2011, 03:07:31 PM by BravoV »

Offline Psi

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Re: Duracell battery leak
« Reply #23 on: September 27, 2011, 08:15:48 PM »
I got a pack of 24 AAA Duracell Ultra batteries from RS components in NZ a few months back and some of those leaked.
I doubt RS were selling fake batteries, at least not intentionally.

The 24 pack was cheap for Duracell brand, so maybe Duracell have lowered their quality.
« Last Edit: September 27, 2011, 08:19:48 PM by Psi »
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Offline bilko

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Re: Duracell battery leak
« Reply #24 on: September 27, 2011, 08:29:34 PM »
I got a pack of 24 AAA Duracell Ultra batteries from RS components in NZ a few months back and some of those leaked.
I doubt RS were selling fake batteries, at least not intentionally.

The 24 pack was cheap for Duracell brand, so maybe Duracell have lowered their quality.
I buy my batteries from recognised high street stores. They never leaked before, I agree, Duracell must have implemented some cost cutting exercise and sacrificed quality. I remember batteries used to leak in the '70s but that was cheap Chinese brands, however they have all improved, except Duracell who have gone back to the '70s. It's not the first time that this has happened with Duracell batteries recently. I had a maglite LED torch that took 3AAA cells, they leaked too.


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