Author Topic: [MOVED] Hacking NVidia Cards into their Professional Counterparts  (Read 1094378 times)

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Offline verybigbadboy

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Re: Hacking NVidia Cards into their Professional Counterparts
« Reply #175 on: March 28, 2013, 10:22:06 pm »
hi again, now I try  to modify palit gts 450 green 1gb to quadro 2000.

I successfully changed device id, but card don't want to start. I need help.
Can someone to create highres scans or proho quadro 2000 card?

Also I found that correct resistors are allways placed near SOIC-8. this ic allways have connected 3 7 8 pins together.

I looked gtx690 pictures and think this ic is located on front side, between left processor and pcie.
6'7''
 

Offline Neo_Moucha

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Re: Hacking NVidia Cards into their Professional Counterparts
« Reply #176 on: March 28, 2013, 10:30:19 pm »
I will try to make the Quadro 2000 scans tonight.
 

Offline raven

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Re: Hacking NVidia Cards into their Professional Counterparts
« Reply #177 on: March 29, 2013, 02:06:31 am »
I guess a TITAN cannot be modded in to a Quadro card only Tesla? Not until K6000 comes out I would think. Also can someone post benchmarks of K5000 mod :)

Would be really interesting to compare SPEC benchmarks with K5000.

Also what Tesla and Quadro unlock is a feature called "out of core" rendering for IRAY. Which is avaliable in Nvidia Design Garage for people to test.
« Last Edit: March 29, 2013, 02:38:58 am by raven »
 

Offline natiss88

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Re: Hacking NVidia Cards into their Professional Counterparts
« Reply #178 on: March 29, 2013, 02:21:56 am »
I guess a TITAN cannot be modded in to a Quadro card only Tesla? Not until K6000 comes out I would think. Also can someone post benchmarks of K5000 mod :)

Would be really interesting to compare SPEC benchmarks with K5000.

+1
 

Offline ray78

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Re: Hacking NVidia Cards into their Professional Counterparts
« Reply #179 on: March 29, 2013, 03:37:34 am »
First off thanks to all contributing to this project!  :-+

file:

I just ordered a GV-N680OC-2GD. I want to set it to K5000, Value need is 11BA instead of 1180. I'll have to use 15k for resistor 2 and remove resistor 3. What value will be needed for Resistor 1?
Another question without having seen this card by now... does "front" in the image mean you have to remove the fan or is it located somewhere easily accessible?
Thanks
 

Offline eos

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Re: Hacking NVidia Cards into their Professional Counterparts
« Reply #180 on: March 29, 2013, 03:56:52 am »
... does "front" in the image mean you have to remove the fan
Yes.

 

Offline verybigbadboy

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Re: Hacking NVidia Cards into their Professional Counterparts
« Reply #181 on: March 29, 2013, 05:00:06 am »
I just ordered a GV-N680OC-2GD. I want to set it to K5000, Value need is 11BA instead of 1180. I'll have to use 15k for resistor 2 and remove resistor 3. What value will be needed for Resistor 1?

Hello ray78

added to my first post summary table.
Summary
GPU NameResistor 1Resistor 2Resistor 3
GTX 67025k10knone
GTX 68025knone5k
tesla k1025knonenone
quadro k5000none15knone
grid k2nonenonenone
6'7''
 

Offline Neo_Moucha

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Re: Hacking NVidia Cards into their Professional Counterparts
« Reply #182 on: March 29, 2013, 05:51:27 am »
OK, for all that are interested in hires pictures of Quadro2000 card, here it goes:

www.moucha.net/temp/Quadro2000.7z

Please note, that it has 61.3 MB - 2 hires tiff photos - front and back

As soon as all who asked for it has downloaded it, I will delete it.

Enjoy.
 

Offline ray78

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Re: Hacking NVidia Cards into their Professional Counterparts
« Reply #183 on: March 29, 2013, 06:10:50 am »
@verybigbadboy and eos: Great and thanks a lot  :-+
Okay... I'm a little bit of a noob :-DD but just searched for a 15k resistor and asked myself which power rating I should choose?
« Last Edit: March 29, 2013, 06:51:54 am by ray78 »
 

Offline mungewell

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Re: Hacking NVidia Cards into their Professional Counterparts
« Reply #184 on: March 29, 2013, 07:07:40 am »
It might be useful to 'correct' the terminology regarding resitor naming, to make it clear which is for which high/low nyble...

In terms of performing the mod, it's easiest just to remove a resistor and not have to solder anything down. Is there any problem with just making everything a Grid-K2?

Do we yet have confirmation that the 660ti or 670 will work with the driver when 'told' to report a different PCI-ID? (asking as the number of cores/etc is different to that they spoof... I assume that the amount of memory is actually reported/probed so that would not be an issue.

Simon
 

Offline eos

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Re: Hacking NVidia Cards into their Professional Counterparts
« Reply #185 on: March 29, 2013, 07:29:01 am »
Is there any problem with just making everything a Grid-K2?
Not really.
Just the Grid is the least known/used flavor of GK104.
And likely the most expensive (if even sold to anybody but server makers).
Future driver updates might treat it differently...
 

Offline InitialDriveGTR

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Re: Hacking NVidia Cards into their Professional Counterparts
« Reply #186 on: March 29, 2013, 10:05:42 am »
I have my GTX 670 FTW setup as a K2 right now, Video outputs work, but unfortunately the disabled cores remain disabled  :-\

But:



Gonna go see if it will still run my surround setup.
 

Offline eos

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Re: Hacking NVidia Cards into their Professional Counterparts
« Reply #187 on: March 29, 2013, 12:23:57 pm »
I have my GTX 670 FTW setup as a K2 right now, Video outputs work...
Thanks.
That's exactly what I want to accomplish.

Did you just remove the resistors 1 & 2?
 

Offline gnif

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Re: Hacking NVidia Cards into their Professional Counterparts
« Reply #188 on: March 29, 2013, 02:21:53 pm »
Hi all,

I decided to have a go at finding the straps for GPU 1 on my card, with both success and failure as the result. I was able to locate them and modify the GTX690 to be a dual core Quadro K5000, but I made the stupid mistake of running it without a heatsync on the bridge chip in the middle of the two while testing. The chip quickly died from overheating when I got excited and let Linux boot into the graphical environment, and there goes my $1000 video card for the greater good, and as such donations are now more important then ever to replace this card now.

I am now running on a semi faulty GT220 (random lockups) and an AMD Radeon X300 to get my triple head working, but as you can imagine this is a very buggy configuration.



Also that SOIC that sits near the straps I believe is the EEPROM.
« Last Edit: March 29, 2013, 02:25:40 pm by gnif »
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Offline amigo

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Re: Hacking NVidia Cards into their Professional Counterparts
« Reply #189 on: March 29, 2013, 02:33:13 pm »
Thank you for taking this mod all the way, and sorry to hear your 690 died in the process. :(

The chip near is the EEPROM from GigaDevice 25Q20 (http://www.gigadevice.com/WebPage/PageDetail.php?PageId=127&WebPageTypeId=98&WebPageTypeId2=151&WebPageTypeId3=134)

That might be interesting to note, perhaps all the Device ID straps are always located around it?
 

Offline gnif

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Re: Hacking NVidia Cards into their Professional Counterparts
« Reply #190 on: March 29, 2013, 02:40:50 pm »
Thank you for taking this mod all the way, and sorry to hear your 690 died in the process. :(

The chip near is the EEPROM from GigaDevice 25Q20 (http://www.gigadevice.com/WebPage/PageDetail.php?PageId=127&WebPageTypeId=98&WebPageTypeId2=151&WebPageTypeId3=134)

That might be interesting to note, perhaps all the Device ID straps are always located around it?

I would not be surprised as one of these straps (the top one) connects through to pin 6, which is SCLK according to the data sheet for that part. Also pin 8 match up as GND, but pin 3 looks like it is VCC, not WP as it is permanently tied high on this card. I do not think it a match, but pretty close.

 So in theory you can find one of the straps by searching for resistors that are connected to pin 6.
« Last Edit: March 29, 2013, 02:43:51 pm by gnif »
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Offline amigo

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Re: Hacking NVidia Cards into their Professional Counterparts
« Reply #191 on: March 29, 2013, 03:14:06 pm »
It seems this might be a new invention at NVidia (for 6xx) series, looking at the GTX 570 and its EEPROM (red box), or just a coincidence that the Device ID straps are near the EEPROM in some 6xx series cards.

 

Offline verybigbadboy

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Re: Hacking NVidia Cards into their Professional Counterparts
« Reply #192 on: March 29, 2013, 05:54:15 pm »
It seems this might be a new invention at NVidia (for 6xx) series, looking at the GTX 570 and its EEPROM (red box), or just a coincidence that the Device ID straps are near the EEPROM in some 6xx series cards.

Not only 600 series. one resistor is located around eeprom since 8000 series. I checked 8600 240 450 cards.
But on gts 450, second is like a sum of 2 resistors on different sides near proccessor.
gts 450 id is 0dc4
Resistors are 10k + "switchable high-low" 20k = 4. I mean 10k = 1, 20k = 3, 1 + 3 = 4 ;)

The easiest way to found them is to check every resistor for 5k, 10k, ... 40k resistances and look how they are connected with "unsoldered" parts.

Not sure about 7000 series, but i think it is too old to modify it :)

6'7''
 

Offline Neo_Moucha

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Re: Hacking NVidia Cards into their Professional Counterparts
« Reply #193 on: March 29, 2013, 08:30:25 pm »
gnif: man, this is sad! (but great work) - patience is everything... is it all dead or is there a chance to replace the damaged chip from another damaged card?
Next month I will donate another $50 to you.

people: c'mon donate at least 10 bucks... everything counts!
 

Offline gnif

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Re: Hacking NVidia Cards into their Professional Counterparts
« Reply #194 on: March 29, 2013, 10:37:39 pm »
gnif: man, this is sad! (but great work) - patience is everything... is it all dead or is there a chance to replace the damaged chip from another damaged card?
Next month I will donate another $50 to you.

people: c'mon donate at least 10 bucks... everything counts!

Getting a dead card would be next to impossible, and replacing the chip would require equipment I do not have, so no, not really viable. And thanks for the support, you have no idea how much it is appreciated.

Seems like someone heard you, just received a $250 donation, WOW :scared: Over 1/2 way there now.  :-+
« Last Edit: March 29, 2013, 11:30:24 pm by gnif »
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Offline InitialDriveGTR

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Re: Hacking NVidia Cards into their Professional Counterparts
« Reply #195 on: March 30, 2013, 06:17:20 am »
I have all the stuff for BGA reworking, if you manage to find a replacement chip I can swap it in for you

When designing circuits such as graphics cards, it's usually a good practice for the engineers in charge of the board design to locate components by their function. IE Power control circuitry in the back farthest away from the GPU, so it makes sense that NVidia (Who I have always thought to make very elegant circuit designs) would group GPU hardware straps near the EEPROM.
« Last Edit: March 30, 2013, 06:27:43 am by InitialDriveGTR »
 

Offline Neo_Moucha

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Re: Hacking NVidia Cards into their Professional Counterparts
« Reply #196 on: March 30, 2013, 06:36:17 am »
Seems like someone heard you, just received a $250 donation, WOW :scared: Over 1/2 way there now.  :-+

Great! :D
 

Offline bdx

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Re: Hacking NVidia Cards into their Professional Counterparts
« Reply #197 on: March 30, 2013, 06:49:57 am »
I removed resistors R2 and R3 on the GTX 660 ti and now have a k10(deviceID 118F)!! What does this say about which resistors need to be removed to give this card the deviceID of 11BF (grid k2)?
From what I can gather it seems I might need to remove R1......but R1 is 40k which would be the same if it were removed.
Any words of wisdom?
 

Offline verybigbadboy

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Re: Hacking NVidia Cards into their Professional Counterparts
« Reply #198 on: March 30, 2013, 07:35:37 am »
I removed resistors R2 and R3 on the GTX 660 ti and now have a k10(deviceID 118F)!! What does this say about which resistors need to be removed to give this card the deviceID of 11BF (grid k2)?
From what I can gather it seems I might need to remove R1......but R1 is 40k which would be the same if it were removed.
Any words of wisdom?

Hi bdx,
I think you should trace pin 6 from eeprom and you will find correct resistor.

Also gtx 660ti may have "softstrap". You may check that by erasing your eeprom by nvflash. do not forget to save bios first.
6'7''
 

Offline bdx

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Re: Hacking NVidia Cards into their Professional Counterparts
« Reply #199 on: March 30, 2013, 09:00:25 am »
By removing R1, R2, and R3, I have turned an GTX 660 ti into a GTX 680.
 


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