Author Topic: Leaking AA and AAA batteries  (Read 18527 times)

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Offline james_s

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Re: Leaking AA and AAA batteries
« Reply #175 on: December 25, 2018, 06:12:45 am »
I just use Eneloops in my expensive devices, problem solved. Never seen one leak.
 

Offline bitseeker

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Re: Leaking AA and AAA batteries
« Reply #176 on: December 26, 2018, 07:45:02 pm »
Eneloops for me as well. I have dozens of their AA and AAA cells powering various devices at home. We use many at work, too. No leaks, yet, for the past 10 years.

For 9V, I've tried a couple brands of NiMH for DMMs, but the sample size is too small to report any findings. So far, so good, though. I recently bought some LiIon rechargeable 9V to test out. Put a couple of them in some smoke detectors.
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Offline 6PTsocket

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Re: Leaking AA and AAA batteries
« Reply #177 on: December 27, 2018, 04:54:09 am »
Alkalines are prone to leakage Duracells are notorius. Costco's house brand, Kirkland are also Duracell. There has been the rare item I could not clean up. Plain distilled white vinegar ($.79 a qt.at the supermarket)  applied with a cotton swab removes the battery crud with ease. A little  dielectric grease protects areas that have lost their plating from the corrosion. Surprisingly, the cheap, Chinese, Harbor Freight alkalines, their Thunderbolt brand have never leaked on me.

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Offline james_s

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Re: Leaking AA and AAA batteries
« Reply #178 on: December 27, 2018, 07:13:20 am »
I've had corrosion damage the contacts to the point where they were never reliable again. Particularly those where a spring is mechanically clipped into a strip.

For 9V I have used several types of NiMH that work well. I have a couple that I bought at Harbor Freight years ago that work about as well as anything in multimeters. I have had a lot less problems with leakage of 9V alkalines than AA though. They typically bulge on the ends before they leak, and the fiber end covers seem to absorb a good deal of electrolyte.
 

Online rdl

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Re: Leaking AA and AAA batteries
« Reply #179 on: December 27, 2018, 09:33:48 am »
As a replacement for 9 volt alkaline NiMH is okay, but the ones I've tried have pretty low capacity. Li-ion is much closer to alkaline for actual run time.

 

Offline james_s

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Re: Leaking AA and AAA batteries
« Reply #180 on: December 27, 2018, 09:36:16 am »
Yeah no argument there, I've found NiMH to be adequate for my DMMs though, they last a fairly long time either way.
 

Offline gbaddeley

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Re: Leaking AA and AAA batteries
« Reply #181 on: December 27, 2018, 04:54:39 pm »
I recently opened a piece of test gear that runs on 4 D size Duracell Alkalines. It had not been switched on for at least 10 years. The cells had use by date 2002. They had not leaked at all, even though they were  flat.
Glenn
 

Offline james_s

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Re: Leaking AA and AAA batteries
« Reply #182 on: December 27, 2018, 04:58:31 pm »
The D cells seem to be quite robust. When we were cleaning out my partner's grandfather's place after he passed away I found a Pay n Save bag from the 80s with a package of Energizer D cells from the 80s that were leaking but that's the only time I can recall seeing D size alkalines leak. I haven't seen many C cells leak either, the AA's are the worst by a long shot, followed by AAA.
 

Offline CatalinaWOW

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Re: Leaking AA and AAA batteries
« Reply #183 on: December 27, 2018, 08:58:12 pm »
I wish the D cells in my Maglites knew they didn't leak. I suspect there are two reasons you haven't seen as many leaking D cells.  First, there are far fewer of them used.  I probably have ten to twenty pieces of equipment using AA or AAA for every one that uses D size.  Secondly, that equipment tends not to put a parasitic load on the batteries.  It is off, not on standby.  As noted previously, batteries are far more likely to leak when drained flat.
 

Online rsjsouza

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Re: Leaking AA and AAA batteries
« Reply #184 on: December 28, 2018, 01:46:21 am »
I have the impression that D cells leak less as well but, as CatalinaWOW mentioned, it may be a numbers game. However, the D cells on my flashlights take much more abuse than the pampered AAs or AAAs, with the bent top notches due to the stress from the flashlights springs and the mechanical hits that naturally happen with them (my twin 5 year olds love to play with them, with the occasional bump and fall).

To me, AAs and AAAs equally leak.
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Offline james_s

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Re: Leaking AA and AAA batteries
« Reply #185 on: December 28, 2018, 06:14:14 am »
A large part of it probably is numbers, I haven't done extensive testing. About the only thing I use D batteries in are the virtual walls for my Roomba, they last quite a long time and are eventually drained completely flat.
 


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