Author Topic: Show your Multimeter!  (Read 328218 times)

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Offline Martin.M

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Re: Show your Multimeter!
« Reply #800 on: May 01, 2017, 06:44:56 pm »
H+B  :)  it have VFD tubes (Tung Sol)
« Last Edit: May 01, 2017, 06:49:49 pm by Martin.M »
 
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Offline Neomys Sapiens

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Re: Show your Multimeter!
« Reply #801 on: May 06, 2017, 06:26:31 am »
Err...too late! And why shouldn't I collect them? It's not that they distract me unduly from the other ones. As for performance monitoring, I had the 6e recently calibrated without problems (company paid for it).
In between, I have a little DC calibrator and I do spot checks against the big digitals.
As for accessories, only the test leads and a pair of grey Hirschmann leads with fixed probes (they resembled the original ones by the grey wire). I have multiple Metrawatt current clamps and shunts, which could be counted as such. What I would cherish most, is the original RF probe, but I am still searching for it.
But as you liked my taste in Hi-Z analogue meters watch for the next post - it is a real jewel!
 

Online AF6LJ

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Re: Show your Multimeter!
« Reply #802 on: May 06, 2017, 06:56:12 am »
H+B  :)  it have VFD tubes (Tung Sol)
I love VFDs...
Sue AF6LJ
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Offline Neomys Sapiens

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Re: Show your Multimeter! - A dirty? pair
« Reply #803 on: May 06, 2017, 07:10:00 am »
Now to switch to the renowned company of SIEMENS, which once had a own line of multimeters and which also underheld various alliances with products appearing under dual brands (ITT Mueller&Weigert, Norma, Gossen..)
But here they are:
Even if I praised the Unigor 6e beyond comparison, here is MY favorite analogue active (amplifier) multimeter: The Multizet A1000!
It is a semi-autoranging instrument, which uses the 0...3 and 0...10 ranges (or equivalent, scaled up or down) on the scale for optimal reading and precision. The actually selected sub-range is indicated on the small LCD, as well as DC polarity (auto!) and battery and fuse status.It was built in two versions, and the one shown here is the extremely rare second one: when you want to stay in the currently selected sub-range, you advance the side mounted power switch to the third position and the range is fixed! This feature was missing in the first version. Interestingly, it uses Fe/Cu-Ni elements for temperature (type J), not the typ K as most multimeters. But I use it more often with the original Siemens active temperature probe, which was offered as accessory. Power is by 6AA cells, and that is where the problem is: on this series of multimeters, you should really really heed the usual advice about removing the batteries when not in use! If you don't, they will corrode to the point of taking the batteries with them. That was what killed my first one (version 1). It has a sibling for DC-only measurement with zero at midscale, the Multizet A1001 (I have and use it too). And there was a real analogue/digital multimeter in the same form factor, of which I do not even know the designation and which I am searching for.

And here is a Siemens DMM, which is also quite rare and special - the B-1010
It is only missing one thing (RMS), but even without it it's a good choice for power-related work.
It has an integrated phase-sequence tester, which is connected by a triple-lead assembly fitting into the leftmost jack. Interestingly, it works quite well in 400Hz systems. Also, a 30A AC range comes handy.
It has the same form factor as the A1000 and can do temperature using type K! Does one understand this model policy? Also powered  by 6AA cells. Here with original case and probes in pristine condition:
 

Offline Neomys Sapiens

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Re: Show your Multimeter!
« Reply #804 on: May 06, 2017, 08:35:09 am »
Now, having poured myself an IPA and assured that I don't miss anything elsewhere, I'm going to show you an even rarer beast, which I doubt that many of them survive and maybe none at all outside of western Germany: The Neuberger PKD4 analogue modular multimeter kit!
The company Josef Neuberger was situated in Munich and did build multimeters and other electrical test gear since the 1930s. It is best known for its tube testers and the Unavo/Telavo multimeter series.
The PKD4 Set was probably originally conceived as a training device and later adapted for professional technical use. It was made in the 70s of the last century.
It consists of a analogue, moving-coil instrument with the usual 10/30 + Ohms scaling which has a sensitivity of 60mV/50µA. It is connected by two 4mm jacks at the right side, into which the 4mm plugs of the associated range and function boxes fit. Measurement connections are to the front side and use 4mm jacks/plugs too. And there was a lot of those boxes:
Besides basic shunt and divider boxes as well as combined I/U boxes there are those with rectification for AC and resistance boxes (containing the battery too) in various range combinations. But that is not all - there was a DC chopper amplifier based voltmeter/microamperemeter with 2MOhm/V (PA6) and an amplifier AC voltmeter covering frequencies well beyond 100kHz with 1MOhm input (PA7) as well as a static (PA8) and a dynamic (PA10) transistor tester!  It came with an optional carrying case (shown below), which could accomodate 2 basic indicators and up to 8 range/function boxes. The accompanying brochure lists not only the characteristics and usage of the modules, but gives the complete circuit diagram for each one!

The makeup of it lends itself extremely well to self-build extensions and as I have lots of ideas I will have some compatible boxes made. I am not willing to sacrifice any of mine, even the redundant ones but I also want them to look exactly the same as the original ones. I plan to make a digital base instrument too, maybe with some memory functions or even a data interface.
One little setback occurs when trying to aquire the batteries needed to operate all modules: the IEC15F20 22.5V block battery needed by the PA7 and PA8 might be well made of Unobtainium! The PA5 and PA11 resistance modules use the 10F15 15V cell, which is only marginally easier to get. The PA10 uses two half-AA (not AAA) cells. I have resorted to fit 2mm jacks in the top side to connect an external supply when possible. Maybe I could build a nice, electrically stable linear power unit for all the options in the same size as the base instrument. Presently I have 2 base instruments with 11 modules and 1 case.

Here the base instrument with one module, second picture shows them partially connected:
 
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Offline Cubdriver

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Re: Show your Multimeter!
« Reply #805 on: May 06, 2017, 09:26:57 am »
Now, having poured myself an IPA and assured that I don't miss anything elsewhere, I'm going to show you an even rarer beast, which I doubt that many of them survive and maybe none at all outside of western Germany: The Neuberger PKD4 analogue modular multimeter kit!
The company Josef Neuberger was situated in Munich and did build multimeters and other electrical test gear since the 1930s. It is best known for its tube testers and the Unavo/Telavo multimeter series.
The PKD4 Set was probably originally conceived as a training device and later adapted for professional technical use. It was made in the 70s of the last century.
It consists of a analogue, moving-coil instrument with the usual 10/30 + Ohms scaling which has a sensitivity of 60mV/50µA. It is connected by two 4mm jacks at the right side, into which the 4mm plugs of the associated range and function boxes fit. Measurement connections are to the front side and use 4mm jacks/plugs too. And there was a lot of those boxes:
Besides basic shunt and divider boxes as well as combined I/U boxes there are those with rectification for AC and resistance boxes (containing the battery too) in various range combinations. But that is not all - there was a DC chopper amplifier based voltmeter/microamperemeter with 2MOhm/V (PA6) and an amplifier AC voltmeter covering frequencies well beyond 100kHz with 1MOhm input (PA7) as well as a static (PA8) and a dynamic (PA10) transistor tester!  It came with an optional carrying case (shown below), which could accomodate 2 basic indicators and up to 8 range/function boxes. The accompanying brochure lists not only the characteristics and usage of the modules, but gives the complete circuit diagram for each one!

The makeup of it lends itself extremely well to self-build extensions and as I have lots of ideas I will have some compatible boxes made. I am not willing to sacrifice any of mine, even the redundant ones but I also want them to look exactly the same as the original ones. I plan to make a digital base instrument too, maybe with some memory functions or even a data interface.
One little setback occurs when trying to aquire the batteries needed to operate all modules: the IEC15F20 22.5V block battery needed by the PA7 and PA8 might be well made of Unobtainium! The PA5 and PA11 resistance modules use the 10F15 15V cell, which is only marginally easier to get. The PA10 uses two half-AA (not AAA) cells. I have resorted to fit 2mm jacks in the top side to connect an external supply when possible. Maybe I could build a nice, electrically stable linear power unit for all the options in the same size as the base instrument. Presently I have 2 base instruments with 11 modules and 1 case.

Here the base instrument with one module, second picture shows them partially connected:


That's a very cool old piece of gear!  Interesting concept.

Very nice!

-Pat
If it jams, force it.  If it breaks, you needed a new one anyway...
 

Offline anachrocomputer

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Re: Show your Multimeter!
« Reply #806 on: May 06, 2017, 09:15:26 pm »
My latest multimeter acquisition, a Fluke 37. I got this one really because of its industrial design -- the storage compartment, the carrying handle, the clip-on stand and so on. I think that electrically, it's a Fluke 27. Just in a different (much bigger) case. I haven't started to restore it yet, but will clean it and probably also clean the zebra strips in the LCD.
 

Offline mmagin

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Re: Show your Multimeter!
« Reply #807 on: May 07, 2017, 01:25:12 am »
It's fascinating that FET VOMs seem to have had a much bigger run in Germany and continental Europe in general than in the US.  It seems like here they just existed in a short decade between VTVMs and 3.5 digit DMMs.

I have recently obtained a Micronta (Radio Shack) 22-220A which seems to need repair.  I'm hoping that if it's the matched JFET pair that's damaged I won't have too hard of a time replacing it.  It's an µPA68H according to the schematic I found elsewhere on the web (reposted here because it was too much effort to find).

It's particularly amusing that they borrowed the industrial design of the Simpson multimeters, albeit cheaply.  It's made in China (no mention of Taiwan, so I assume mainland China, so probably late 1970s or later?)
 

Offline Neomys Sapiens

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Re: Show your Multimeter!
« Reply #808 on: May 07, 2017, 02:24:19 am »
It's fascinating that FET VOMs seem to have had a much bigger run in Germany and continental Europe in general than in the US.  It seems like here they just existed in a short decade between VTVMs and 3.5 digit DMMs.


I think there are various aspects to it. At least here in Germany, you have a higher level of technical training especially at the craftsman/technician level. I mean, an engineering degree is (and was 50yrs ago) closer together on both sides of the atlantic ocean than the idea of what makes an 'electrician'. So, the problem of difficult to read analogue meters was less important, as the potential users were assumed to be properly trained for it.
Then, there might have also existed a deeper 'technical conservatism' both on the side of the instrument makers and users.
Also, US instrumentation companies such as HP, Tek, Keithley etc. were far more present in european markets than the other way round. So their DMMs were available and actively marketed. My first DMM was a Fluke 8060A and it was among the first batch sold over here. I remember selecting it over the Beckman 3030RMS, and there was no RMS handheld DMM from german manufacturers at that time (about 1983).
My boss at the engineering office, where I worked while still in school, who was certainly up to date, as we were doing quite advanced automation stuff, was not convinced - he advised me to go for one of the big Unigors, as he distrusted sampling and numeric displays not to show him really what happens.
So companies over here might have cultivated the analogue niche market for longer.
My first electronic analogue MM was a Philips PM2505, which came after the Fluke, when my older Metravo2H (passive) did not survive a unexpected contact with a 750VDC streetcar supply line in a traffic control installation.
GMC still sells an active analogue multimeter in the guise of the METRAport3A (practically the same than a Metravo 3E). Of course, both in this one and in the Siemens A1000 which I presented ICs have taken the place of the simple FET pair.
But the phenomenon is not limited to the active (FET/amplifier) variety. For example, the multimeter pool at Rockwell-Colling Germany contains lots of the old black Siemens Multizets with their class1 spec. They are calibrated regularely and treated well and I see no reason not to use them in complex lab work, where you really measure one or two signals but have ko keep an eye on some others.
 

Offline ciccio

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Re: Show your Multimeter!
« Reply #809 on: October 04, 2017, 08:43:36 pm »
I decided to post in this old thread to share my collection of multimeters.
Like many forum members I buy a new multimeters (or a new soldering station) even if I do not need it, but my wife has the same problem with shoes :), and the last multimeters I bought  were cheaper than a pair of shoes :-+

In fact a new one arrived after I shoot the collection, and is not in the photos: a nice ANENG AN8002.

Photo 1:
- WAVETEK (Meterman, now Amprobe) 5 XL  : a basic 3.5 digits, very robust, with the best display in the collection
- Meterman (now Amprobe) 33XL : a very robust, reliable, SLOW 3.5 digits HEAVY meter.
Please note that it has leading zero suppression, that's a little unusual but nice.
- UniT UT61A : I don't know why I'm always grabbing  this one as first choice :D
- UniT UT61E : I needed true RMS :-+ to replace an old Beckman that was sold in the last clearance of the lab.

Photo 2:
- STANDARD (no name ?) clamp meter
- Meterman (Amprobe) PM33 pocket: I don't use it very much because the single button operation is annoying, and I don't like the fixed probes.
- PEAK TECK 1020 pocket: it is a nice instrument with flashlight and Non Contact Voltage detector.
New production has detachable/replaceable probes. The display is good, but it is placed too far from front panel, so reading at an angle is difficult.
It has no tilting stand, but I've found on the Web that some maker made a nice attachment.
- ANENG AN8008: recent arrival. It is very nice, I like it very much.
Same for the not shown AN8002.
Please forgive the photo's low quality.


« Last Edit: October 04, 2017, 08:47:07 pm by ciccio »
Ciccio

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Offline jscm2000

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Re: Show your Multimeter!
« Reply #810 on: December 05, 2017, 08:53:15 pm »
I use a multimeter? :-DD
 

Offline sullyRD

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Re: Show your Multimeter!
« Reply #811 on: February 07, 2018, 12:15:01 am »
This meter is a Vintage NovoTest TS140 from 1968, made by a Itailian company Cassinelli. S.a.s &Co Milano.


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Offline rsjsouza

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Re: Show your Multimeter!
« Reply #812 on: February 07, 2018, 06:46:16 am »
Wow, the fonts, graphics and the probe inserts are remarkably close to a ICE 680R multimeter my dad bought many years ago (also italian).
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Offline Neomys Sapiens

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Re: Show your Multimeter!
« Reply #813 on: February 07, 2018, 07:57:19 am »
Wow, the fonts, graphics and the probe inserts are remarkably close to a ICE 680R multimeter my dad bought many years ago (also italian).
It is the previous name of the very same outfit AFAIK.
 
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Offline shakalnokturn

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Re: Show your Multimeter!
« Reply #814 on: February 07, 2018, 09:45:33 am »
My bench DMMs:

One of the 7040's needs attention anyone have the service manual specific to that model?
The 7150's needs a re-cal.
Although it works well I would also be glad to find schematics or service info for the Dana 5100.
 

Offline shakalnokturn

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Re: Show your Multimeter!
« Reply #815 on: February 07, 2018, 09:56:47 am »
And the handheld DMMs...
I managed to thin down the heard of scopes then this madness took over, I admit I do tend to go over the top on things, have always refused to go to the TEA section though! (Only because I do sell the odd thing once in a while.)

I have skipped a couple: I have 2 of those Tecpel 2606 clamp meters, and a vintage 1950's Metrix model 430 analog meter, I'll have to get a pic of that one over as it's actually a nice piece of gear.

The lower line are, or will be for sale. (Beckman T100, Metrix MX40, Metrix MX45, Metrix MX52 missing lexan, Wavetek 2020)

How I wish I could afford a 9V battery now...
 

Offline sullyRD

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Re: Show your Multimeter!
« Reply #816 on: February 07, 2018, 10:09:06 am »
Wow, the fonts, graphics and the probe inserts are remarkably close to a ICE 680R multimeter my dad bought many years ago (also italian).
It is the previous name of the very same outfit AFAIK.
The Novotest TS-140 is very hard to source, this one took me a few years to get because most that come up for sale are in a sorry condition, this one is near mint.
« Last Edit: February 08, 2018, 08:40:41 am by sullyRD »
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Offline BNElecEng

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Re: Show your Multimeter!
« Reply #817 on: February 07, 2018, 10:06:16 am »
My bench DMMs:

One of the 7040's needs attention anyone have the service manual specific to that model?
The 7150's needs a re-cal.
Although it works well I would also be glad to find schematics or service info for the Dana 5100.

Google turned a manual for the Dana 5100AF multimeter from the website ko4bb.com. Link https://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=http://ko4bb.com/manuals/download.php%3Ffile%3DRacal/Racal_Dana_5100AF_Digital_Multimeter_Manual_HQ.pdf&ved=2ahUKEwiNmrPcspLZAhXIDsAKHd_sAps4ChAWMAd6BAgKEAE&usg=AOvVaw3DfejjZxpKspkNur4iKDjG

Hope the link worked
 

Offline shakalnokturn

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Re: Show your Multimeter!
« Reply #818 on: February 07, 2018, 10:29:40 am »
My bench DMMs:

One of the 7040's needs attention anyone have the service manual specific to that model?
The 7150's needs a re-cal.
Although it works well I would also be glad to find schematics or service info for the Dana 5100.

Google turned a manual for the Dana 5100AF multimeter from the website ko4bb.com. Link https://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=http://ko4bb.com/manuals/download.php%3Ffile%3DRacal/Racal_Dana_5100AF_Digital_Multimeter_Manual_HQ.pdf&ved=2ahUKEwiNmrPcspLZAhXIDsAKHd_sAps4ChAWMAd6BAgKEAE&usg=AOvVaw3DfejjZxpKspkNur4iKDjG

Hope the link worked

Thanks for the link, it should be close enough, I'll have to take a peek in my meter to check though.
Having a quick look through that service manual: Wow! I didn't really expect to find a +/- 300V supply in there!
 

Offline bitseeker

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Re: Show your Multimeter!
« Reply #819 on: February 07, 2018, 10:43:31 am »
And the handheld DMMs...

Neat collection. Many I've not seen before.

Quote
I managed to thin down the heard of scopes then this madness took over, I admit I do tend to go over the top on things, have always refused to go to the TEA section though! (Only because I do sell the odd thing once in a while.)

Resistance is futile. You already show clear signs of the infection. And selling some of your stuff doesn't disqualify you. I've done it too. (Shhh! Don't tell the others. ;D)
You don't acquire TEA. It acquires you.
 

Offline Cubdriver

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Re: Show your Multimeter!
« Reply #820 on: February 07, 2018, 11:49:53 am »
And the handheld DMMs...

Neat collection. Many I've not seen before.

Quote
I managed to thin down the heard of scopes then this madness took over, I admit I do tend to go over the top on things, have always refused to go to the TEA section though! (Only because I do sell the odd thing once in a while.)

Resistance is futile. You already show clear signs of the infection. And selling some of your stuff doesn't disqualify you. I've done it too. (Shhh! Don't tell the others. ;D)

 :rant: <grabs pitchfork and lights torch>  :rant:

 :P

-Pat
If it jams, force it.  If it breaks, you needed a new one anyway...
 

Offline bitseeker

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Re: Show your Multimeter!
« Reply #821 on: February 07, 2018, 01:35:48 pm »
Oh no! They found me. :-DD
You don't acquire TEA. It acquires you.
 

Online VK5RC

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Re: Show your Multimeter!
« Reply #822 on: February 07, 2018, 10:38:22 pm »
What is this phrase "sell test equipment" ??? >:D
Whoah! Watch where that landed we might need it later.
 
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Offline ciccio

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Re: Show your Multimeter!
« Reply #823 on: February 08, 2018, 01:02:28 am »
Wow, the fonts, graphics and the probe inserts are remarkably close to a ICE 680R multimeter my dad bought many years ago (also italian).
It is the previous name of the very same outfit AFAIK.
No, they were similar but different products from different manufacturers. I used both of them (but I preferred a bigger AVO 8 ) , and after more than 40 years the ICE is still in production (you can buy it on RS).
The ICE was 20 kohm/V, the Cassinelli was 40 kohm/V.
In this webpage http://www.webalice.it/rocco.piccone/progetti/cassinelli/cassinelli.html youcan find schematic and manual for the Cassinelli.
Best regards
Ciccio

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Offline macboy

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Re: Show your Multimeter!
« Reply #824 on: February 08, 2018, 03:03:41 am »
And the handheld DMMs...
I managed to thin down the heard of scopes then this madness took over, I admit I do tend to go over the top on things, have always refused to go to the TEA section though! (Only because I do sell the odd thing once in a while.)

I have skipped a couple: I have 2 of those Tecpel 2606 clamp meters, and a vintage 1950's Metrix model 430 analog meter, I'll have to get a pic of that one over as it's actually a nice piece of gear.

The lower line are, or will be for sale. (Beckman T100, Metrix MX40, Metrix MX45, Metrix MX52 missing lexan, Wavetek 2020)

How I wish I could afford a 9V battery now...

Nice collection of ASYC-II meters there  :D
I have a B&K 5360 (similar to MX-56) and it is my favorite handheld.
If you look around these forums you will find links to information on how to build a serial-to-IR interface for a few dollars, plus the logging software and the calibration software, as well as an interface specification which details all the low level details so you could build your own software. I have tried to collect this information into this post .
 


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