Author Topic: What's this please? (Component Advice)  (Read 361987 times)

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Offline SgtRock

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #150 on: March 11, 2012, 04:22:06 pm »
Greetings EEVBees:

--In this case we have no device, only the ghost of a departed device. Please see attached picture(s) of the FSC121SOF Fan Speed Control for a Vornado fan, I am trying to fix for a friend. The solder side of the board had only one SMD component, which apparently exploded. An honorary Deerstalker hat will be awarded to anyone who can solve this one

"It is quite a three pipe problem, and I beg that you won't speak to me for fifty minutes."
Sherlock Holmes 1854 -

Best Regards
Clear Ether
 

Offline Rufus

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #151 on: March 11, 2012, 04:29:05 pm »
--In this case we have no device, only the ghost of a departed device.

Looks like it was just a necked down track designed to act as a fuse.
 

Offline amspire

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #152 on: March 11, 2012, 11:41:51 pm »
--In this case we have no device, only the ghost of a departed device.

Looks like it was just a necked down track designed to act as a fuse.

Agreed. Probably the triac (or whatever it is) has shorted. The marks on the PCB track side are the ghost of the way the track blew, not the ghost of a SMD device.

Richard.
 

Offline SeanB

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #153 on: March 12, 2012, 12:56:35 am »
Seeing as the board only has 2 wires the only reason for the track to flash and burn is if the motor has developed a short circuit in the windings. You will probably find on removing the triac that it is split into 2 parts, one being the plastic top with 2 leads and the other being the tab. Check the motor for that crispy beyond belief smell, or use a 100W incandescent light bulb to do power limiting and power it up.
 

Offline SgtRock

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #154 on: March 12, 2012, 07:06:41 am »
--Dear All:

--Thanks for all your advice. I checked the motor. Indeed, it is burned up. Next time I will know to check, before worrying about the small stuff.

"When people thought the Earth was flat, they were wrong. When people thought the Earth was spherical they were wrong. But if you think that thinking the Earth is spherical is just as wrong as thinking the Earth is flat, then your view is wronger than both of them put together."
Isaac Asimov 1920 - 1992
 

Offline SeanB

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #155 on: March 12, 2012, 07:34:18 am »
I am doing some repairs of similar speed controllers, but these are DC motors, that run on 200VDC. Same simple triac control but with a very failure prone bridge rectifier on the output side. New Triacs where needed, new bridge rectifiers ( 8A 600V instead of the 4 cheap and seriously overrun 1N4004 diodes it had) and new VDR's on input and output side. Hope they hold up better, even with the crappy PCB's it has. I just have to repair them cheaper than a new board from China costs. i am hoping to repair to better than original so they will not fail. I might make retrofit modules from light dimmers and a separate bridge rectifier if needed, as they will definitely last longer then. Room enough to fit in the case anyway.
 

Offline SgtRock

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #156 on: March 12, 2012, 07:58:24 am »
Greetings EEVBees:

--I got such good help for dummies on the last one, that I have decided to try one more. See the attached picture of the end of my new Panasonic Lumix DMC-FX37 Camera. The jack at the left is for 5 Volt DC power. I already have a good power supply, but I need the plug to fit that jack. Does anybody happen to know what the name of the jack is, and/or where I can get one. Honorary Calabash pipe to be awarded. Rufus was awarded the Honorary Deerstalker hat in our last contest.

“Horse sense is the thing a horse has which keeps it from betting on people."
W. C. Fields (William Claude Dunkenfield) 1880 - 1946

Best Regards
Clear Ether
« Last Edit: March 12, 2012, 08:00:02 am by SgtRock »
 

Offline SeanB

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #157 on: March 19, 2012, 03:58:56 am »
It is what could be laughingly called "Propietary" designed by Painosonic plug. If you can find a Panasonic dealer who actually repairs these things you probably will be able to order the cable as a spare part through them ( likely to be expensive though, nice equipment, spares are somewhat available but pricey) with the plug moulded on the end.
 

Offline metalphreak

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #158 on: March 19, 2012, 09:02:20 pm »
Point and shoot cameras are THE WORST. Every manufacturer has to have their own dicky proprietary cable for everything. What's wrong with mini or micro USB? "Oh we want to put video out in the same jack". Fine, you know HTC managed to make a proprietary port for their smartphones that had audio in/out as well as USB, yet you could still plug in a normal mini-usb cable! Genius!

Your best bet is to just buy an adapter off ebay, and steal the cable if the supply is rubbish.

Offline SeanB

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #159 on: March 21, 2012, 10:11:01 pm »
I have a Canon camera with a power input using a tiny coaxial plug. Canon wants an arm and a leg ( and assorted other body parts as well) for the power adaptor. Went down to One Hung Low Mall ( actually Wan Dong Wholesalers) and bought a $2 USB multipart charger. Has a mains to 5V charger ( real cheap n nasty, but works well enough to supply 5V rail up to 100mA), a 12V car adaptor and a plug with 10 different sockets on it. One fits camera, and the car adaptor was modified ( shunted a resistor in feedback loop to chip inside) to give 3.3V for the camera. Now I can use the camera for long periods, without the hassle of replacing the batteries every few minutes.
 

Offline CampKohler

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #160 on: April 07, 2012, 09:27:38 am »
Maybe he wants to know what a spectrum analyzer is? The latter is an oscilloscope that displays across the screen all the frequencies within its design range. It shows which radio signals are present at what place in the spectrum (hence the name) and at what strength. Usually they can be tuned and narrowed down in width (frequency) so as to pick out and magnify one signal to see what the output of a device looks like and whether it is putting out garbage, etc.

They work by having an oscillator that sweeps across the range in the manner of a radio receiver whose tuning knob is being whirled back and forth so quickly that, through the persistance of the 'scope tube and your eyes*, you can see everything in the range covered. They are expensive and the higher they go, the more costly they are. There have been some reasonable 'scope probes made that, with a 'scope give a miniature poorman's version.

Basically it's for radio work, but it could also apply to audio (it used to be hard to build an audio receiver, but probably not now). Usually you just look at the screen and see what there is to be seen, but I imagine nowadays there is all kinds of calculating power available to be applied to the signals and the prices would be astronomical.

Of course if you really want to know the truth of the matter, you would just read where else?.

----
*I suppose they could digitize and store it all so that persistance is not a factor. The 'scope would just play it back and wouldn't have to be very fast.
 

Offline CampKohler

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #161 on: April 07, 2012, 09:41:03 am »
Anyone have any idea what this E1271 diode is?
If you have a lot of these diodes, I wouldn't toss them. They might become your general-purpose diode. I got a similar bunch years ago.

I put a microammeter in series with a power supply hooked up in the reverse direction and ran the voltage up until the needle started to rise (not too much; if the diode shorts, the meter is toast!). That (minus a little safety factor) became the PIV. Then I ran some current through it until it got hot to the touch and that became the max current. No matter what they were originally designed for, they should work OK for low-level power supplies, etc.   
 

Offline G7PSK

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #162 on: April 25, 2012, 03:15:33 am »
Can any one tell me please what the blue rectangle item is on this RS brand 100X oscilloscope probe whatever it is I cannot get any sort of reading on my dvm.  The probe will not work with any scope so I disassembled it after finding no continuity  on it and this item that is paralleled with a capacitor formed by inserting a wire into a  brass tube with a Teflon sleeve.
 

Offline SeanB

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #163 on: April 25, 2012, 06:45:00 am »
Probably a 10M resistor, and it is open circuit, so that is why you get no reading. The capacitor is a shunt to compensate for the cable capacitance. You will probably find if you look at it with a magnifier that either it is cracked at one end or one lead is broken. Broken lead can be repaired, but if it is cracked you need a new resistor. Likely to be cheaper to replace the probe, or use a regular 0.3W metal film unit and accept the probe will be less accurate and will only be usable up to 100V peak.
 

Offline G7PSK

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #164 on: April 25, 2012, 05:15:19 pm »
Thank you SeanB for that I sort of figured it must be a resistor as that is the only way it would work but it has no markings and it is in series with a 1 meg resistor at the tip of the probe and tere is another net work in the BNC end along with the trimmer. I cannot see any cracks but there could be one under the blue film at the end I can see the metal film comeing out from under the blue one.
 

Offline amspire

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #165 on: April 25, 2012, 05:49:08 pm »
The picture is too blurry to see properly. If it is a 100x probe and the 1meg resistor is across the scope input, the blue film resistor may be up around 40 to 50 megohm and this is beyond some multimeters ability to measure. That could easily be a 2.5KV resistor, and around 40meg  to 100meg would be about right for that voltage. 

To check, put a multimeter across the 1meg resistor and apply 10V or so from the tip to the far end of the 1meg resistor. Are you getting a voltage on the multimeter? Keep in mind that the multimeter input resistance will change the voltage a little.

Richard.
 

Offline G7PSK

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #166 on: April 25, 2012, 06:45:47 pm »
I decided to check it with my insulation tester and at 100 volts it measures 98 Meg ohms so I guess this probe will not work on my signal generator which out puts less than a volt. I need to find a high voltage 1Khz square wave signal to set it up, any one any ideas.
 

Offline vk6zgo

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #167 on: April 25, 2012, 08:34:05 pm »
I used a 100x probe at work for quite some time,years ago,but I can't remember how I adjusted it.

I was almost certainly using a 2 channel analog Tek which probably gave access to the output of one of the vertical channels,so I might have used both amps in cascade to get enough gain.
The display would still have been "furry",but it would have done the job.

Another idea would be to make a valve (tube) multivibrator using a couple of 12AT7s,run off a 100V dc supply.
If I remember correctly,the ones I made when first playing around with a 'scope supplied fairly reasonable waveforms.

The old 545 'scopes had a calibration signal which could be switched as high as 100V,so if you could find a 545
enthusiast,you'd be good to go!
 

Offline G7PSK

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #168 on: April 25, 2012, 08:56:22 pm »
I have a circuit for a valve square wave generator I guess its time to build it, the test probe came with a National scope I got off Ebay the test signal on the scope only outputs at 0.1 volt square wave   which is its design voltage. Most likely why it was sold was the person could not get the scope to work with that probe, the strange thing about the scope is it's has tree traces all select-able on the switches.
 

Offline bilko

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #169 on: April 27, 2012, 12:12:35 am »
Trying to identify a part, couldn't find it using Google. It is marked 1S15, could be IS15, TO-92 type package. It could be quite old, probably 1980's, any clues anybody ?
 

Offline PA0PBZ

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #170 on: April 27, 2012, 12:40:39 am »
1S Smells like diode, does it have 2 or 3 pins (connected)?
Any clue about manufacturer?
Keyboard error: Press F1 to continue.
 

Offline vk6zgo

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #171 on: April 27, 2012, 12:41:01 am »
1S15 could be a Sony part.
I vaguely remember the number from the time I was fixing a lot of stuff from that manufacturer.
 

Offline bilko

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #172 on: April 27, 2012, 01:10:38 am »
 I checked Google, it lists a 1S15 device but it is an axial packaged diode with two leads.
The 1S15 part I have has three legs, the Sony reference may be interesting.
There are no other markings on the device

Edit:
It measures like an NPN transistor so I'll proceed from there and run some more tests.
Thanks everyone for your help
« Last Edit: April 27, 2012, 02:17:16 am by yachtronics »
 

Offline vk6zgo

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #173 on: May 02, 2012, 07:36:54 pm »
I know it's a long way down the track since the last posting,but it occurs to me that the "S" may be an incomplete "8",in which case,your device may be a 2SC1815,which is a common type in a lot of Japanese equipment.
JEDEC  markings often leave the "2SC" part off.
 

Online Psi

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #174 on: June 09, 2012, 12:32:32 pm »
anyone know whats this is?

Mislabeled digikey packet, was supposed to be a DO-15 package TVS diode.

It does look kinda like a diode, and has a metal top.
I don't really want to remove it from the pack until i know if digikey want it back



Greek letter 'Psi' (not Pounds per Square Inch)
 


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