Author Topic: What's this please? (Component Advice)  (Read 338092 times)

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Offline Rufus

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #50 on: May 17, 2011, 11:20:11 am »
Diode:  Marked 62T02 and GI9774 (both on one diode, two lines)  Google is no help.  About the size of a 1N4002

unknown device in TO-220 package:  IR9502  International Rectifier's website doesn't recognize it.

GI9774 will be General Instruments and a date code. 62T02 is possibly a complete part number but if so it seems to be an obscure part.

IR9502 will be IRF9502.
 

Offline hannobisschoff

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #51 on: June 14, 2011, 11:04:56 pm »
this should definitely be made a sticky thread. Or is it one already? :-\
 

Offline topcat

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #52 on: August 01, 2011, 12:59:05 am »
Hi all,

I am working on a little project which needs a display, and I managed to salvage this 128x64 which I would like to use.
Can Anyone know what kind it is or suggest where I may find a spec for it?

Thanks.
 

Offline ThePranksta

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #53 on: October 13, 2011, 09:05:16 pm »
My guess from a bit of Googling is it is an unit from the JHD group, quite possibly a custom unit. Nearest I could find was the following:
http://download.maritex.com.pl/pdfs/op/JCG12864A0305.pdf

As far as I know most of these units use the same Samsung LCD driver so you might want to give it a shot.
 

Offline oliver602

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #54 on: October 17, 2011, 03:37:29 am »
I have an old power mac powersupply that died. I don't know how the supply works but I have found a suspect looking component with burn marks on it. I've tried googleing and searching the big electronics suppliers but can't find anything.

It's in a 3 pin TO-220 marked H530 TOP200YAI PB0779. I don't recognise the logo either.

It fits on the small heat sink in the bottom left. I removed R4 and the TO220 package before taking that photo.
 

Offline Rufus

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #55 on: October 17, 2011, 04:05:39 am »
It's in a 3 pin TO-220 marked H530 TOP200YAI PB0779. I don't recognise the logo either.

http://www.powerint.com/sites/default/files/product-docs/top200-204214.pdf
 

Offline oliver602

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #56 on: October 19, 2011, 03:44:28 am »
Thanks Rufus
 

Offline BravoV

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #57 on: October 27, 2011, 04:45:33 pm »
I'm going to do a major recap at my tek 2465B scope and found these, question is what is so special about this cap compared to ordinary good quality electrolytic type ?

Also it looks like its non polar type, can't find any marking.






These are at the switching ps section, they also used normal electrolytic type as the one below with 100uF 50 V marking underneath these metallic looks cap, they're encapsulated with clear plastic though.

 

Offline requim

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #58 on: October 29, 2011, 10:09:38 am »
I found this on eBay and am wondering what probe this is.  I thought it might be for an LCR meter but looking at it more I'm thinking probably not.. Ideas?

http://www.ebay.com/itm/120766582589?ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1423.l2649#ht_499wt_1185
 

alm

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #59 on: October 29, 2011, 10:41:00 am »
I don't recognize it. The four SMB connectors don't scream LCR meter to me though, since these are typically used for high(ish) frequencies. The coaxial construction of the probe also indicates RF. I would also expect at least two, if not four, connections to the DUT for an LCR meter.
 

Offline mikeselectricstuff

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #60 on: October 29, 2011, 10:50:32 am »
Ultrasonic probe perhaps ? Listing mentions aerospace, so maybe for ultrasonic inspection.
Youtube channel:Taking wierd stuff apart. Very apart.
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Offline amspire

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #61 on: October 29, 2011, 12:34:59 pm »
I will vote for a Hall sensor to measure magnetic flux strength.
 

Offline tekfan

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #62 on: October 30, 2011, 11:42:31 am »
What about a current probe with the missing current transformer on the front where the thread is? DC current probes need hall sensors too.
One can never have enough oscilloscopes.
 

Offline amspire

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #63 on: October 30, 2011, 12:26:43 pm »
What about a current probe with the missing current transformer on the front where the thread is? DC current probes need hall sensors too.

The sensor for a current transformer is extremely thin and is built into the transformer core - it cannot be in a tube. Definitely if we could see the missing half of the probe, the purpose would probably be obvious.

It is also very likely that without the missing half, it is probably enormously useless.
 

Offline Rufus

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #64 on: October 31, 2011, 03:47:26 am »
I found this on eBay and am wondering what probe this is.

It is more like a spare part for a probe. Closest thing I see is http://www.home.agilent.com/agilent/product.jspx?nid=-34051.536880742.00 but is doesn't look exactly the same.
 

Offline requim

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #65 on: October 31, 2011, 07:52:19 pm »
@Rufus - Yeah I saw that too and thought perhaps that was what it was for.  An older obsolete version perhaps.  Who knows.. Still has me stumped and I'd just like to know purely out of curiosity.
 

Offline requim

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #66 on: November 07, 2011, 07:22:43 pm »
Well it looks like I stumped you guys on the last one.  Hopefully not so much on this one.  I'm looking for the female companion to the following male connector found on the HP 204C Sine Oscillator - Board A1.  The two units I received are missing the power supply / battery adapter boards so I'm planning on constructing a makeshift connector so I can power it through my DC power supplies to test / verify functionality and then I plan on selling them because they're not much use to me without the power adapter and making one from scratch following their schematics doesn't seem to be worthwhile.  I think the parts would be prohibitively expensive, not to mention trying to create a PCB. 

But I digress.  Can anyone tell me what the name of this part would be? I've searched around Digi-key and google a bit and came up empty.  I searched using the HP Part number (1521-1631) as well as the manufacturer's part #, and came up empty.  I imagine I can still find that type of connector, but I haven't the faintest idea what they're called.
 

Offline amspire

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #67 on: November 07, 2011, 11:04:51 pm »
First of all, all that is needed for a power supply is +/- 13V. Should be easy with a transformer, rectifier, capacitors and a couple of IC regulators.

You do need to work out the current consumption.

If you are talking about the PCB edge connector, it looks like a standard 0.156" PCB edge connector. Check the pad spacing to confirm if it is 0.156 inches.

http://search.digikey.com/us/en/products/306-010-500-102/EDC306100-ND/107635

Richard

 

Offline requim

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #68 on: November 07, 2011, 11:59:57 pm »
@amspire - right you are.  That was obviously an easy one.  I've attached an image of what the power supply board is supposed to look like.  The details from the manual are lacking on the transformer.  The manual seems to provide enough detail regarding the other parts. 

Aside from the transformer issue, I'm still left with the PCB issue as well as a way to mount it since both enclosures are missing their covers.  It appears these units could be mounted inside a chassis and I assume based on the parts that I have that one was and the other wasn't.  Unfortunately the one that wasn't chassis mounted is missing it's exterior case as well.

If you have any suggestions regarding the transformer and PCB I'm all ears.  I saw someone posting something yesterday about doing some sort of pcb transfer/etching with a laser printer.  I have a laser printer so that might be worth investigating I'll have to google around for more details on that.
 

Offline amspire

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #69 on: November 08, 2011, 12:43:35 am »
I have attached a very rough circuit for a power supply. I will leave you to look up the data sheets and calculate the resistors for 13V. The negative regulator needs a minimum load to work, so if the oscillator can at times draw very little current, you may need to add an extra resistor across the -13V.

This circuit needs a transformer with a single winding 15V to 20V. If you have an old 12v DC power pack (the heavy ones with a transformer), the transformer inside would probably be fine. The oscillator does not use much current, so possibly anything you can scrounge will be OK.

For the board, it is not the strongest, but you could just get some veroboard-type prototyping board (the one with the parallel copper strips). Cut a hole for the edge connector leads and solder on the back. Build the power supply board on it. Cut away lots of the spare tracks on the primary.

I wouldn't worry to much about the battery option. For one thing, the Mercury batteries thy did use do not exist any more - they are banned.

If  it is only the power supply boards missing, that is good as it is the one thing that is easy to replace.

Now this is no frequency synthesizer, but for work below 1MHz, what you get is the great vernier dial that none of the synthesizers have. For general testing, this is much faster to use then any synthesizer.

Richard
 

Offline requim

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #70 on: November 08, 2011, 02:48:01 am »
Looks like this will be a good little project to learn a bit more about electronics since I have no idea how to do the calculations.  Guess I'll be doing a fair amount of reading and work through MIT's opencourseware.

Out of curiosity, what's the primary difference between your schematic and the one in the manual for the power supply I showed?  I notice some parts are missing from yours however knowing that you used to design power supplies, I'm sure you know what you're doing.
 

Offline firewalker

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #71 on: November 08, 2011, 02:54:39 am »
Any hints?



It is placed in a small board of the antenna input of a Philips mini Hi-Fi. In the board's header output you can see pins labeled as SDA and SCL so it has an I2C interface.

A decoder for something perhaps? An input level meter? Could it use the AM ferrite coil antenna and act as a radio clock?

Alexander.
« Last Edit: November 08, 2011, 02:59:50 am by firewalker »
Become a realist, stay a dreamer.

 

Offline requim

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #72 on: November 08, 2011, 06:47:19 am »
Would this transformer work for the sine oscillator?  The manual states it uses 400mA so this seems like it would work just fine.

http://search.digikey.com/us/en/products/ST-4-16/595-1166-ND/953036

I'm still unclear on the whole voltage thing though.  i thought I had to match voltages so why can I do a 16V transformer when I need 13V?
 

Offline metalphreak

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #73 on: November 08, 2011, 07:19:59 am »
Any hints?



It is placed in a small board of the antenna input of a Philips mini Hi-Fi. In the board's header output you can see pins labeled as SDA and SCL so it has an I2C interface.

A decoder for something perhaps? An input level meter? Could it use the AM ferrite coil antenna and act as a radio clock?

Alexander.

AMETEK AF3020 AM FM Dual Band Radio Receiver Module

http://www.ienk.com/am-fm-dual-band-radio-receiver-module-p-331.html

Not much info on the net for it.

alm

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #74 on: November 08, 2011, 08:57:17 am »
I would be very careful to observe proper clearance when running mains over veroboard, and probably try to avoid it all together, since it's exposed and easy to accidentally touch.
 


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