Author Topic: What's this please? (Component Advice)  (Read 328606 times)

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Offline timelessbeing

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1350 on: May 06, 2018, 12:31:33 pm »
I believe the (e3) marking is related to RoHS. ST are well known for making custom parts with unobtainium datasheets, this one is no exception.

So it is.  Tin finish.
http://www.ti.com/support-quality/environmental-info/lead-free/lead-free-conversion.html
 
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Offline timelessbeing

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1351 on: May 21, 2018, 10:55:21 am »
Matsushita
5E592004 Iss. 1
740U 3C 49
(28 pin)

It came from a fridge thermostat. Would be nice if I could adapt the board to non-fridge purposes.
« Last Edit: May 21, 2018, 11:11:20 am by timelessbeing »
 

Offline Urs42

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1352 on: May 22, 2018, 05:25:33 am »
The 5V Part in the power supply of my dell u3011t LCD is dead, i guess the 24V part which is it's own power supply on the same pcb does still work but i did not try that. There is an enable line which switches on the 24V part.

It looks like the chip that is shown on the attached pictures is dead, there is a small crack on the bottom of the case. I can't see any markings on this chip :-(

The 5V PSU is rated for 6.5A Pins 7-12 are connected to GND Pin 6 is connected to the primary side of the transformer
 

Offline Urs42

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1353 on: May 23, 2018, 04:45:43 pm »
I found the markings on the chip, a microscope helps a lot, it is a TOP264-271 Chip

http://www.mouser.com/ds/2/328/topjx_family_datasheet-11851.pdf
 

Offline amyk

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1354 on: May 24, 2018, 12:14:06 pm »
Matsushita
5E592004 Iss. 1
740U 3C 49
(28 pin)

It came from a fridge thermostat. Would be nice if I could adapt the board to non-fridge purposes.
Almost certainly a mask ROM/OTP microcontroller. I remember seeing a reference to a 5E5* type part numbering pattern for a Japanese MCU series before, but I can't seem to find which one now.
 

Offline chicken

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1355 on: May 25, 2018, 10:50:15 am »
I don't expect an exact part identification, but I wonder what the purpose of the chip near the SD card holder is.

This is the back side of the main PCB in a Canon PowerShot G9. When assembled, the mystery chip is facing the shielding over the battery compartment. The chip is mounted in a clear QFN package, and there's a big black area that looks suspiciously like a light sensor. Which doesn't make any sense given the ICs location.

The service manual that I found didn't include the schematic but only a PCB diagrams, identifying the chip as IC502. In the same group of designators, there are only a few passives, Zener diode, (dual) transistor and an LDO.

Having taken apart many point & shoot cameras, I'm pretty good at identifying the purpose of the main chips. But this one leaves me puzzled.

Any guesses?
« Last Edit: May 25, 2018, 10:53:12 am by chicken »
 

Online CJay

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1356 on: May 25, 2018, 05:51:09 pm »
That is odd, it does look like some kind of light sensor and of cpourse transparent package.

Is it possible there's a light pipe to it built into the case?
M0UAW
 

Offline timelessbeing

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1357 on: May 25, 2018, 06:00:30 pm »
I guess I would follow the traces and see what it's connected to.

Are there any discernible characters on the chip die?
 

Offline chicken

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1358 on: May 26, 2018, 03:17:04 am »
No light pipe, unless I lost it during disassembly. It would have to be pretty big and intricate to reach the IC.

Unfortunately, no letters or numbers visible at the resolution I can get out of my stereo microscope. If anyone in the Seattle area with a better microscope wants to assist, PM me.
 

Offline Cyberdragon

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1359 on: May 26, 2018, 04:20:45 am »
Half of it looks like digital logic interfacing to something on the other side (ADC/DAC?). That does look like a sensor. Have you identified all the drivers for the ports on the board. If it's not one of those I'd wager it's a self contained infrared camera watching for battery overheat. Stupidly overcomplicated if so. ::)

EDIT: In the tiny chance that for some reason there's an EPROM in there...don't expose it to UV. :-BROKE
« Last Edit: May 26, 2018, 04:37:23 am by Cyberdragon »
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Offline peteb2

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1360 on: May 26, 2018, 10:12:59 am »
0Q0500.... Here are a couple of never "seen befores" (for me).... 24 pin DIP i can only imagine the code is custom to equipment they belong in and masked RAM or a resistor network .... They were in a bag of 1980s era spares components found during a dumpster diving moment. Mr Google has no info which is actually the first time i have not found an olde ic .pdf!

Serious mystery that's all, not the end of the day but someone may have come across the device.
 

Offline peteb2

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1361 on: May 27, 2018, 08:59:31 am »
Well, what better than to find just a little bit more out yourself....

This was a random strip of paper in the bag of 'dead' parts rescued to be hoarded... (i hope not) i found recently while dumpster diving...

The 0Q0500 is a "Bit Reduktion ic"... it seems.... hmmmm ??? The long spares code looks very Philips too.... That throws up more questions like era, and what could possibly have used a thing like this? Love to see a data sheet....





 

Offline amyk

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1362 on: May 28, 2018, 12:09:01 pm »
About that clear QFN30 IC on the camera --- I'm almost certain I've seen something like it before, although I don't think I figured it out either; it looks more like the light sensors used for tamperproof hardware security, which erase keys etc. when the device is opened...

"Bit reduktion" sounds like parallel-to-serial conversion, and there's a few ICs for that purpose in DIP-24, so they might just be custom-labeled CD4034s or 74674s.
 

Offline Urs42

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1363 on: June 03, 2018, 04:24:13 pm »
I got a Zener diode that is marked 120B· or I20B· it is also possible that it is l120B· i'm not sure :-( does someone know this marking? It might be a 120V Zener diode but i'm not sure...
 

Offline jitter

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1364 on: June 09, 2018, 08:02:00 pm »
0Q0500.... Here are a couple of never "seen befores" (for me).... 24 pin DIP i can only imagine the code is custom to equipment they belong in and masked RAM or a resistor network .... They were in a bag of 1980s era spares components found during a dumpster diving moment. Mr Google has no info which is actually the first time i have not found an olde ic .pdf!

Serious mystery that's all, not the end of the day but someone may have come across the device.

0Q... sounds like proprietary ICs made by Philips for e.g. Fluke/Philips scopes.

This image shows a Fluke scope stuffed with the proprietary ICs:


However, your's look unusual in that they are not clearly identifiable as a Philips manufactured part.
The part no. is indeed the so called "12NC" format as used by Philips.
The "k" in reduktion would suggest perhaps a German manufactured IC, I'm pretty sure the Dutch or overseas factories would have spelled the word as "reduction".

"Bit reduktion" sounds like parallel-to-serial conversion, and there's a few ICs for that purpose in DIP-24, so they might just be custom-labeled CD4034s or 74674s.

Well, the lower line on the tag shows "P-SER/0394". So a parallel to serial converter produced week 3 of 1994?
« Last Edit: June 09, 2018, 08:09:28 pm by jitter »
 

Offline Fortran

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1365 on: June 15, 2018, 12:52:38 am »
Any one got a clue on this one?
I've been meaning to make a copy of this RS485 board for a Drews 5310, but I can't figure out what the two SO8 in the middle are.
They are labeled 600-712 and 600-633.

 

Online gamalot

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1366 on: June 15, 2018, 01:09:59 am »
Any one got a clue on this one?
I've been meaning to make a copy of this RS485 board for a Drews 5310, but I can't figure out what the two SO8 in the middle are.
They are labeled 600-712 and 600-633.



HCPL0600

http://www.onsemi.com/pub/Collateral/HCPL0639-D.pdf
 
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Offline JDubU

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1367 on: June 15, 2018, 01:16:07 am »
« Last Edit: June 15, 2018, 01:19:02 am by JDubU »
 
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Offline Fortran

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1368 on: June 15, 2018, 01:50:38 am »
That was quick  :P

Looks about right.  Thanks a bunch both of you  :-+
 

Offline owentec

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1369 on: June 15, 2018, 11:21:43 pm »
Hi, does anyone have a clue what device this is, or what an equivalent might be? It's from a Sony RCP1500 camera remote control panel and is from the PSU section. It's a voltage regulator, but doesn't conform to any pinout for other 10-pin SON regulators that I can find.
 

Online gamalot

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1370 on: June 16, 2018, 12:54:21 am »
Hi, does anyone have a clue what device this is, or what an equivalent might be? It's from a Sony RCP1500 camera remote control panel and is from the PSU section. It's a voltage regulator, but doesn't conform to any pinout for other 10-pin SON regulators that I can find.

TPS62020DRCR

http://www.ti.com/lit/ds/symlink/tps62020.pdf
 
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Offline owentec

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1371 on: June 17, 2018, 08:16:39 am »
Thanks for that. Could you share how you figured that out? There is another one on the board that I also can't identify... picture attached. All help appreciated.

 

Online gamalot

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1372 on: June 17, 2018, 10:01:29 am »
Thanks for that. Could you share how you figured that out? There is another one on the board that I also can't identify... picture attached. All help appreciated.

LT3481EDD

http://www.analog.com/media/en/technical-documentation/data-sheets/3481fc.pdf

I found them by searching silk screen on Taobao.com  :)
 

Offline timelessbeing

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1373 on: June 17, 2018, 08:35:50 pm »
manufacturers also have their own lookup tools.

http://www.ti.com/packaging/docs/partlookup.tsp
https://www.nxp.com/packages
...
 

Offline TerraHertz

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Re: What's this please? (Component Advice)
« Reply #1374 on: June 27, 2018, 10:30:13 pm »
This is the back side of the main PCB in a Canon PowerShot G9. When assembled, the mystery chip is facing the shielding over the battery compartment. The chip is mounted in a clear QFN package, and there's a big black area that looks suspiciously like a light sensor. Which doesn't make any sense given the ICs location.
  ...
Any guesses?

Expensive looking package. Someone thought whatever it does, was important enough to spend extra money.
My guess would be that it's a crypto chip, with an 'erase keys if camera opened' tripwire. In which case that black square is not a light sensor; rather a solar cell, that gives enough power under room light to drive the erase circuit.

Now, why would there be a secret-key crypto chip in a consumer camera?


I have a much simpler question.
The tag strip of custom wire-wound resistors are from an old Shimadzu QV-50 Spectrophotometer. One of them has been replaced with a multi-turn pot, presumably because the original resistor failed.
I have two of these instruments, from the same source; on the other unit these resistors are all original.

The question: These wire resistors (1st pic) use a wire with low temperature coefficient, yes?
So, how would I go about constructing a proper replacement, with the right temp coefficient?
The trimmer is set to 980 ohms, and I could measure the hopefully still good resistor on the other unit.

Oddly enough, only some of these have anything written on the little slips of protective paper, and there's only loose correspondence between the written numbers and actual values. For instance one marked "10" is 8.9K.

Incidentally, I've had zero luck finding any kind or user or service manual for the QV-50. Shimadzu didn't reply to a query.
All I found were a few advertisements in old magazines from the 1960s.




Collecting old scopes, logic analyzers, and unfinished projects. http://everist.org
 


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