Low Cost PCB's Low Cost Components

Author Topic: NASA $100,000 Air Prize - Aerosol sensor  (Read 766 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline ez24

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 2588
  • Country: us
NASA $100,000 Air Prize - Aerosol sensor
« on: September 23, 2017, 11:04:28 AM »
I assume this will be mostly sensor electronics

Quote
Individuals, teams, and organizations that meet eligibility criteria are welcome to apply. Ideas should focus on easy to maintain, small, and affordable aerosol sensor technology. Apply no later than Wednesday, January 31, 2018, at 5:00 PM Central.

https://www.earthspaceairprize.org/

Dog on a leash  - ah I am going to win  :-DD



Offline Mechatrommer

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 7547
  • Country: my
  • reassessing directives...
Re: NASA $100,000 Air Prize - Aerosol sensor
« Reply #1 on: September 23, 2017, 05:36:28 PM »
only ship in american |O
if something can select, how cant it be intelligent? if something is intelligent, how cant it exist?
 

Offline thm_w

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 442
  • Country: ca
Re: NASA $100,000 Air Prize - Aerosol sensor
« Reply #2 on: September 26, 2017, 08:12:17 AM »
What are they specifically looking for?
They mention particulates, but I assume its more general than that, otherwise they would ask for a "particulate matter sensor".

Quote
Why is this prize focused on aerosol sensor technology?
NASA has identified particulate monitoring as a gap in its technology roadmap to enable future long-term missions. Current technology does not provide the level of sensitivity, the longevity, or the ability to operate in a reduced-gravity environment. The added bonus of this technology demonstration competition is the potential benefit to human health on Earth as well as in space.

That or the person who wrote this site does not know the terminology/details.
 

Offline Mechatrommer

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 7547
  • Country: my
  • reassessing directives...
Re: NASA $100,000 Air Prize - Aerosol sensor
« Reply #3 on: September 26, 2017, 09:42:51 AM »
Or they expect participant to do their own master thesis research within this few months and have access to nano particle lab. we can tell from the prize and prototyping grant alone. There are already consumer grade aerosol sensor out there, but it seems not meeting their spec.. so this is not a cheap project. They expect participants to know what they are doing...
if something can select, how cant it be intelligent? if something is intelligent, how cant it exist?
 

Online Brumby

  • Supporter
  • ****
  • Posts: 5507
  • Country: au
Re: NASA $100,000 Air Prize - Aerosol sensor
« Reply #4 on: September 26, 2017, 02:05:32 PM »
Here's the timeline...

Register
Do you have an idea to develop or adapt technology for monitoring aerosols in a habitat in space or a community here on Earth? You must first register no later than Wednesday, December 13, 2017, at 5:00 PM Central.

Apply
Individuals, teams, and organizations that meet eligibility criteria are welcome to apply. Ideas should focus on easy to maintain, small, and affordable aerosol sensor technology. Apply no later than Wednesday, January 31, 2018, at 5:00 PM Central.

Get Feedback
Each valid application receives scores and comments from five Evaluation Panel judges, using a trait-scoring rubric with four criteria: instrument technology, longevity, physical properties, and features for Earth & Space application.

Build a Prototype
Based on the rank order of submissions, three Finalists will be named. Finalists will be awarded $50,000 each to build a functioning sensor according to their submitted proposals within a six-month period. Prototypes will be delivered to NASA by September 30, 2018.

Test a Prototype
Finalists will attend a demonstration and testing period in October 2018 to compete for the Grand Prize at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The Selection Committee will determine the Winner who will receive a $100,000 award.



Unless someone has found a lichen that changes colour or something else like that out of left field, it's going to take a special individual or a lab that's already set up to be able to get anywhere with this ... IMHO.
 

Offline ez24

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 2588
  • Country: us
Re: NASA $100,000 Air Prize - Aerosol sensor
« Reply #5 on: September 26, 2017, 03:19:34 PM »
.. it's going to take a special individual or a lab that's already set up to be able to get anywhere with this ... IMHO.

And that individual is .... Brumby  :-+

$50,000 to build a prototype !

With all the brain power here who knows.

My idea is start with a mini - dog


Online Brumby

  • Supporter
  • ****
  • Posts: 5507
  • Country: au
Re: NASA $100,000 Air Prize - Aerosol sensor
« Reply #6 on: September 26, 2017, 06:03:15 PM »
I wish.

Not in the race .... besides, Australia is getting a space agency (so we've been told) - and if I did have any ideas, I'd be looking at keeping them on shore ... if possible.
 

Offline Mechatrommer

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 7547
  • Country: my
  • reassessing directives...
Re: NASA $100,000 Air Prize - Aerosol sensor
« Reply #7 on: September 26, 2017, 06:41:35 PM »
when the citizen registered, but the design is made by non-citizen(s), isnt that considered cheating?
if something can select, how cant it be intelligent? if something is intelligent, how cant it exist?
 

Offline PedroDaGr8

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 1213
  • Country: us
  • A sociable geek chemist
Re: NASA $100,000 Air Prize - Aerosol sensor
« Reply #8 on: October 05, 2017, 06:49:33 AM »
Here's the timeline...

Register
Do you have an idea to develop or adapt technology for monitoring aerosols in a habitat in space or a community here on Earth? You must first register no later than Wednesday, December 13, 2017, at 5:00 PM Central.

Apply
Individuals, teams, and organizations that meet eligibility criteria are welcome to apply. Ideas should focus on easy to maintain, small, and affordable aerosol sensor technology. Apply no later than Wednesday, January 31, 2018, at 5:00 PM Central.

Get Feedback
Each valid application receives scores and comments from five Evaluation Panel judges, using a trait-scoring rubric with four criteria: instrument technology, longevity, physical properties, and features for Earth & Space application.

Build a Prototype
Based on the rank order of submissions, three Finalists will be named. Finalists will be awarded $50,000 each to build a functioning sensor according to their submitted proposals within a six-month period. Prototypes will be delivered to NASA by September 30, 2018.

Test a Prototype
Finalists will attend a demonstration and testing period in October 2018 to compete for the Grand Prize at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The Selection Committee will determine the Winner who will receive a $100,000 award.



Unless someone has found a lichen that changes colour or something else like that out of left field, it's going to take a special individual or a lab that's already set up to be able to get anywhere with this ... IMHO.

This sounds a lot like an SBIR grant, which I don't think NASA does traditionally. They tend to be VERY specific, not always ask for exactly what they want and tend to not give a lot of money for the Phase I.
The very existence of flamethrowers proves that some time, somewhere, someone said to themselves, "You know, I want to set those people over there on fire, but I'm just not close enough to get the job done." -George Carlin
 

Online Brumby

  • Supporter
  • ****
  • Posts: 5507
  • Country: au
Re: NASA $100,000 Air Prize - Aerosol sensor
« Reply #9 on: October 05, 2017, 10:30:43 AM »
Considering humans have been in space for a while now, it would seem to me that the problem they are trying to solve has probably been around for some time.  It may not be a mission critical one - but it could be a safety and/or comfort thing.  I mean, they've had someone smelling things for years to make sure no stench ends up in a confined space.

$250,000 plus administration costs and about a year for the process seems to be a good deal for NASA.  I would think the chances of getting several new ideas is high.

Even rocket scientists could run short on ideas after a while.
 


Share me

Digg  Facebook  SlashDot  Delicious  Technorati  Twitter  Google  Yahoo
Smf