Author Topic: Why is everybody ranting about Autodesk's Subscription-Model?  (Read 7068 times)

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Offline homebrew

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Why is everybody ranting about Autodesk's Subscription-Model?
« on: November 14, 2017, 08:57:00 pm »
I'm just curious what the REAL reasons are why people are ranting so much about the 'new' eagle subscription model. Maybe I'm overlooking something but there don't seem to be many GOOD arguments.

And before your ask - No, I'm in no way shape or form associated with Autodesk whatsoever ... this post is just for my curiosity.
But it is true that I started my hobby out with Eagle and got kinda stuck to it. Years ago I had a Non-commercial license for version 4.0 Standard edition for Linux.

Arguments in favour of the subscription model:
1) I now can afford it! For 15$ a month I can have the "Standard" Version of the product an can even use it commercially! In the old model this was in the realms of several hundred dollars, that I wouldn't have spent for my hobby.
2) Multi-platform without licensing issues - Now I'm not bound to any specific operating system anymore and yes - I sometimes switch them :-)
3) Commercial support available - never needed it though. No extra fees for product upgrades and so on and so on...

Arguments against a subscription model (potentially):

1) I don't own the software anymore. Well - you actually never did! Even with the old model you just owned the right to use but of corse it without a time restriction. Now instead you buy a time-limited usage right for a MUCH lower price.

2) I cannot afford to be constantly billed. Then your business is probably crap anyway or if you do it on a hobby basis you must simply attest that you cannot use commercial CAD Software at all and switch to open source alternatives. And is it really more expensive with the new model? That depends on how long you can actually use the product, how long it is supported, if it runs on the current version of your operating system and so on and so on ... Hence even in the old licensing model you 'constantly' payed for the updates and newer versions. Just on longer cycles. Even worse, you pay the money upfront! If you want to switch, then you have potentially huge sunk cost.

3) If Autodesk decides to shut their service down I'm screwed. Yes, but first, you still have a license agreement and an SLA that they must comply to - so I won't happen without notice. Second the project data (XML-Format) of your project is still there. So it could either be imported with an older version of the product or be converted to another data format. Yes, that would require some (actually big) effort to change your cad system. But, that would hit you the same way in any other licensing model. If a product is dead an no longer supported, you need to switch anyway.

4) I now cannot work offline! Plain wrong. For 30 days you actually can work offline (though I never tried). Who would design electronics being offline for longer periods anyway? Datasheets? Browsing Digikey/Farnell?  Regular google sessions? Sending the data to your board house?

Anyway, maybe I've overlooked some very important issues but I just don't get it why there is so much fuzz about it. But yes, I also could convert to KICad and forget licensing issues altogether. I really tried hard (as you could see from previous posts I made here) but the single most important feature to me is eagle's roundtrip capability of switching seamlessly between schematic and layout work. Maybe I'm just to incompetent to design a system sequentially and unidirectionally just using the netlist to track changes consistently ...

Ah anywa,y enough waffling. Maybe there are some opinions?
 

Offline NANDBlog

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Re: Why is everybody ranting about Autodesk's Subscription-Model?
« Reply #1 on: November 14, 2017, 09:04:00 pm »
Because: Eagle is a bad product as it is. It was about 500 money to buy, and for that amount, you got a barely usable software which had the same functionality as paint, except it could generate gerber files.
Also, it messes up a lot of older open source projects. They were using eagle, because Stockholm syndrome. And it had a free version. Now it doesnt have one, which means that random Joe who likes electronics cannot open the project anymore.
 

Offline capt bullshot

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Re: Why is everybody ranting about Autodesk's Subscription-Model?
« Reply #2 on: November 14, 2017, 09:19:03 pm »
I'm not ranting on the new model, I just stopped using Eagle and switched to KiCad. Not a big deal, since I don't have any professional projects on eagle, I can afford to lose all the old projects - those were mostly prototypes or drawings for the CAD people to enter into the fricking large and expensive CAD system they use.

Reason: I want to be able to freely use and install software that I use once it is paid (or even better: FOSS). Don't want to be bothered with licensing stuff. Anything that cannot be used for an unlimited amount of time once installed, and cannot be moved / reinstalled easily without re-licensing on another machine is considered evil and I do actively avoid such stuff. Using hacked SW or whatever serial generators is sometimes a way to get around these limitations, but often too cumbersome to be taken into account. So my preferred way is to use only FOSS or commercial SW with an "pay once and use forever" model.

To me, software should be like hardware: Once bought, it's up to you what you do with it and you use it until it's your own desire to replace it.
« Last Edit: November 14, 2017, 09:22:59 pm by capt bullshot »
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Offline Karel

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Re: Why is everybody ranting about Autodesk's Subscription-Model?
« Reply #3 on: November 14, 2017, 09:30:43 pm »
This has been discussed before but here are some reminders:

http://www.eevblog.com/forum/eagle/the-autodesk-eagle-edition/msg1118387/#msg1118387

People keep comparing EAGLE to Fusion360. This is wrong and irrelevant. In Fusion360,
you can export your design to .step, .iges, .dxf, and any number of other standard
formats supported by countless other tools.  It's OK for Fusion360 to be cloud-based,
subscription-based, or whatever, because its author can't grab you by the proverbial
pussy.

For electronics CAD, there is no standard format that can represent your combined PCB
and schematic design with all of its underlying metadata and library content. Your
tools and your data are inseparable.  If your tool vendor can revoke your ability to
run their PCB CAD program, then they are the ones who actually own your work product.
Not you. Not your customer. The lame-ass tool peddler.

No one who cares about their work product can afford to allow their tool vendor to
behave this way. It really is that simple.

http://www.eevblog.com/forum/eagle/the-autodesk-eagle-edition/msg1118527/#msg1118527

@Dave, it's not going subscription. So there. :) At this stage, that isn't anywhere on my roadmap.
Thought about it.  Decided against it.  Can I say that we will never in the life of any product
do that?  No, of course not.

http://www.eevblog.com/forum/eda/autodesk-buys-eagle/msg977529/#msg977529

Autodesk is full subscription going forward and this position is
non-negotiable. I know that for a lot of you this is not good news, but
there's not much that can be done about it.

I'm truly sorry guys.
Jorge Garcia

http://www.eaglecentral.ca/index.php/mv/msg/52901/168331/#msg_168331


2.1.3 Territory. Except as otherwise authorized in writing by Autodesk, the licenses granted in
this Agreement are granted only for the Territory. Nothing in this Agreement permits Licensee
(including, without limitation, Licensee's Personnel, if any) to Install or Access the Licensed
Materials outside of the Territory.

Territory? So I can't use Eagle when I travel outside of the states without buying a new license for that territory?

http://download.autodesk.com/us/FY17/Suites/LSA/en-US/lsa.html

It's not paranoia to anticipate and to plan for the failure of
things that can fail; it's called "engineering".

Autodesk is willing to throw its users under the bus, with no warning and even after promising otherwise, if it suits their purposes. This very real risk is enough to make people think twice about investing their time in the Eagle ecosystem (in addition to Autodesk's money grubbing license policies).

The pricing is not the issue (though it's more expensive for someone who makes a PCB every month). The part you're missing is that some of us prefer not to have our tools stop working on the day Autodesk decides Eagle isn't worth it anymore.
The difference between theory and practice is less in theory than
the difference between theory and practice in practice.
Expensive tools cannot compensate for lack of experience.
 
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Offline jolshefsky

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Re: Why is everybody ranting about Autodesk's Subscription-Model?
« Reply #4 on: November 14, 2017, 11:55:29 pm »
In many industries, designs are kept for decades. Once a design stabilizes, it stays in production and unchanged for many years. But then as often happens, a minor change needs to be made.

With careful planning, one can make a backed-up archive that includes both the design files and software. When it's time to make a minor change, the archive can be restored and the original software started again to make the change. Internet services and cloud-based systems change far too quickly by comparison.

On a city tour recently, we got to see the small hydroelectric station on our river. It was installed in 1917. They rewound the generators several times, but it wasn't until a major overhaul that they replaced the generators—in 2013. Back then they used paper blueprints and they're still accessible. What if a power plant were built today with files on the cloud—do you think it would still be around in 2113?
May your deeds return to you tenfold.
 
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Online legacy

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Re: Why is everybody ranting about Autodesk's Subscription-Model?
« Reply #5 on: November 15, 2017, 12:12:52 am »
Yes, indeed the point: I need to use a CAD even when I am not located in the same place where I subscribed the license, as well as I need to use my laptop in places where there is no internet connection, neither I can/want to connect to internet.

EagleCAD v5, v6 and v7 were a good product for the money they costed, anyway  :-//
the Bunker is open!
 

Offline aandrew

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Re: Why is everybody ranting about Autodesk's Subscription-Model?
« Reply #6 on: November 15, 2017, 12:14:31 am »
3) If Autodesk decides to shut their service down I'm screwed. Yes, but first, you still have a license agreement and an SLA that they must comply to - so I won't happen without notice. Second the project data (XML-Format) of your project is still there. So it could either be imported with an older version of the product or be converted to another data format. Yes, that would require some (actually big) effort to change your cad system. But, that would hit you the same way in any other licensing model. If a product is dead an no longer supported, you need to switch anyway.

I think you are truly understating this point. I have Eagle designs going back a decade that I still work with. With software that doesn't call home I can install it in a virtual machine and never, ever lose access to that environment. With cloud based shite, I'm at the mercy of the vendor. Not just today, but forevermore.

I don't just do this with EDA either; I have virtual environments for projects which encapsulate FPGA tools, compilers and even test environments. How would you build or manage software on systems whose compilers have to call home to make sure you're allowed to build? Or having to forward-port software that is stable and well-understood to work with libraries or development flows that are in flux? There are a lot of unknowns when changing these things, and to expect people to just suck it up and add that time and expense to their bottom lines... It's utter nonsense!

Others have already mentioned that there is no generic EDA data exchange format. If there were, it would remove a lot of the pain in picking and sticking to a toolset, but there's still literally years, possibly decades of knowledge and hard-earned experience that have to be re-learned when switching tool vendors (and even sometimes in changing major versions of a tool). As the owner of a small business, I have enough to worry about to keep my business profitable and my customers happy. The additional worry of "will my tools be accessible tomorrow" is one which can easily be avoided. Autodesk (and on a totally separate rant, Microsoft) really shot themselves in the foot over this.
 
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Offline homebrew

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Re: Why is everybody ranting about Autodesk's Subscription-Model?
« Reply #7 on: November 15, 2017, 01:43:10 am »
Also, it messes up a lot of older open source projects. They were using eagle, because Stockholm syndrome. And it had a free version. Now it doesnt have one, which means that random Joe who likes electronics cannot open the project anymore.

??? I don't understand. One can still download and use Eagle "free" - with the known limitations ... All you need is an Autodesk-Account, which is free ...
Old versions are still available, too. So how would that break existing designs?
 

Online Mr. Scram

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Re: Why is everybody ranting about Autodesk's Subscription-Model?
« Reply #8 on: November 15, 2017, 01:50:56 am »
I have very bad experiences with supposedly being allowed to work offline. Regularly, the system figures you do need to be online sooner and stops working until you do, often at very unfortunate moments.

Then there is the SLA, of which it is silly to think that will be honoured when things go awry, or the product gets canceled. Most agreements allow for changes after the fact and even if you have a year to migrate, that's a large potential expense you don't have any control over.

So you basically commit to continuously spending money, rather than spending one lump sump, only to add a number of significant risks to the continuity of your business. That has bad idea written all over it.
« Last Edit: November 15, 2017, 01:54:26 am by Mr. Scram »
 

Offline Karel

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Re: Why is everybody ranting about Autodesk's Subscription-Model?
« Reply #9 on: November 15, 2017, 01:52:52 am »
If a product is dead an no longer supported, you need to switch anyway.

But nobody is forcing you to do that within a certain timeframe or in the middle of a long-term ongoing project.

For example, we are using Eagle V7. For obvious reasons, we are not going to "upgrade" to V8.
Because we have a perpetual license that doesn't need an internet connection, we can continue to use V7 as long as we wish.
In the mean time we will decide to which EDA we will switch. But without any pressure.


The difference between theory and practice is less in theory than
the difference between theory and practice in practice.
Expensive tools cannot compensate for lack of experience.
 

Offline woody

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Re: Why is everybody ranting about Autodesk's Subscription-Model?
« Reply #10 on: November 15, 2017, 03:27:28 am »
I think at least part of the annoyance is over the fact that Eagle was used by a lot of people that actively invested time to put up with its quirks and suggested changes that made it a better product. Over the course of many years it became the standard for PCB design for hobbyists and smaller (or larger) companies. They bought the product, upgraded whenever there was a reason to do so, sent a mail to support every now and then and were more or less happy.

Then along comes a sack of money that buys up the product and proclaims that from now on you can only use it as long as you pay. And as long as you have an Internet connection. No real surprise here, because from email accounts to routers this is the direction that the market turns. You do not own stuff, you buy it and then you hire the license to use it. This is the future.

And for people looking for a new EDA package it probably is a decent deal (assuming that Autodesk does iron out the quirks). But for people who invested lots of money and time in it to get Eagle where it is today, it rubs them the wrong way.

In my case, I make it a point not to use cloud services (SAAS / storage) if I can circumvent it. I do not want my data somewhere beyond my control. I don't want my programs to change overnight. So I run my own mail server and my own cloud server. On my own hardware. No way I let M$ or Google sit on my data, as long as solid alternatives are available.

I do realize that this is a fight I will lose in the longer term, but so far, so good.

As for Eagle, I have a license to V7 but for new designs I now use Kicad. It took me a couple of weeks to get accustomed to it and the first days found me yelling at Autodesk for forcing me to learn something else a lot. But having traveled the learning curve I have to admit, Kicad is easier to use than Eagle. The lack of roundtrip capability you mentioned is something that is not in the way at all. If anything I started to like the fact that you generate a netlist from a schematic and specifically have to load it to use it in a PCB. Copper pouring works much better. Apart from that Kicad feels faster in use. Opening, closing, moving, zooming all works great. At some point I realized that although I had lots of questions during these weeks, I never once had to ask one in their forum. Lots of information is readily available. Does all this make Kicad ideal? No. Each and every EDA software it has its quirks you have to know before you appreciate it. But is certainly very usable as it is. At least as usable as Eagle. And future updates are free  ;D
 
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Offline jgarc063

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Re: Why is everybody ranting about Autodesk's Subscription-Model?
« Reply #11 on: November 15, 2017, 04:02:04 am »
Because: Eagle is a bad product as it is. It was about 500 money to buy, and for that amount, you got a barely usable software which had the same functionality as paint, except it could generate gerber files.
Also, it messes up a lot of older open source projects. They were using eagle, because Stockholm syndrome. And it had a free version. Now it doesnt have one, which means that random Joe who likes electronics cannot open the project anymore.

Hi NANDBlog,

Opinions aside, EAGLE still has a free version which you can download without issue. Using the free version you can always open your designs and generate your manufacturing data.

Let me know if there's anything I can do for you.

Best Regards,
Jorge Garcia
 

Offline Karel

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Re: Why is everybody ranting about Autodesk's Subscription-Model?
« Reply #12 on: November 15, 2017, 04:10:51 am »
Hello Jorge, how are you? I hope you are doing well.

Can the free version be installed and used without internet connection and also in case the autodesk servers are offline for more than 14 days?

Kind Regards,
Karel
The difference between theory and practice is less in theory than
the difference between theory and practice in practice.
Expensive tools cannot compensate for lack of experience.
 

Offline macegr

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Re: Why is everybody ranting about Autodesk's Subscription-Model?
« Reply #13 on: November 16, 2017, 06:30:49 am »
Can I use the free version to open up an 8 year old file for a 6-layer PCB, remove an IC that was EOL by manufacturer and replace it with another non-pin-compatible IC, move a few traces and passives, and re-generate production files? If the answer is yes; can I do it legally with a free license since this is for commercial purposes?
 

Offline macegr

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Re: Why is everybody ranting about Autodesk's Subscription-Model?
« Reply #14 on: November 16, 2017, 06:42:25 am »
I want to point out something we've said from the very beginning...the subscription model works for many people. Great for occasional users, educators, etc. Gives them access to a tool they otherwise wouldn't be able to afford. The pros and cons balance out nicely.

Keep the subscription model but add a perpetual offline license key option and I would 100% sing the praises of Eagle and Autodesk again, and apologize publicly to Jorge, Ed, and Matt for the snark over the past year. They would have listened to their customers and figured out a way to make it work, which is admirable behavior for the company. $2000 up front or whatever. $300 bi-yearly upgrade packs. I don't care. I just don't want my software to stop working tomorrow, 5 years from now, 10 years from now, unless I'm making that decision for myself. But as long as it's subscription-only, it's not something I can use, and I'm still stuck with un-addressed bugs on MacOS that they will never fix.
 
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Offline jgarc063

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Re: Why is everybody ranting about Autodesk's Subscription-Model?
« Reply #15 on: November 16, 2017, 07:07:33 am »
Hello Jorge, how are you? I hope you are doing well.

Can the free version be installed and used without internet connection and also in case the autodesk servers are offline for more than 14 days?

Kind Regards,
Karel

Hi Karel,

I'm glad you asked this question. The free version has one very unique, subtle property that a lot of people aren't aware of. If you install the freeware version of EAGLE, you have to sign in only ONCE. Let me clarify the process. If you are going to be a free version user this could be the process.

1) Install EAGLE freeware
2) Sign in with your Autodesk credentials

Once the credentials are accepted you can literally disconnect the computer from WIFI, ethernet, etc. forever and you won't be asked to sign in again. This is to guarantee that the freeware will always be able to at least open the files and generate gerber data. So in the doomsday scenario, you would install EAGLE into a virtual machine, sign in once before all of the servers die and always have a version of EAGLE available to open your files, run an export ULP, generate CAM data etc. Since the freeware is Free, it's not critical to enforce a time limitation which is why Matt was able to get that done.

This only applies to the freeware version.

Let me know if you or anyone has any questions on that. It's very subtle so I want to make sure it's clear.

Best Regards,
Jorge Garcia
 

Offline jgarc063

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Re: Why is everybody ranting about Autodesk's Subscription-Model?
« Reply #16 on: November 16, 2017, 07:24:12 am »
Can I use the free version to open up an 8 year old file for a 6-layer PCB, remove an IC that was EOL by manufacturer and replace it with another non-pin-compatible IC, move a few traces and passives, and re-generate production files? If the answer is yes; can I do it legally with a free license since this is for commercial purposes?

Hi macegr,

It's nice to hear from you again. The answer to your question is no, the freeware version wouldn't allow you to modify the six layer board so there's no need to answer the second question. However, I've been thinking a lot about this long term support situation, it's been on my mind since this all started. I've never made anything that has required a guaranteed 10-15(or whatever time frame you want to put) year availability, but I know some of you do. Here's my question to you guys, and it's a real question, not trying to be polemic but I'm trying to understand the situation.

Let's say you have a customer and they enter into a contract with you where they will purchase X amount of product for the next 15 years, so you must now guarantee support for the product for that time frame. What happens if for whatever reason you have to close up shop 8 years into the contract? I know there are a lot of extenuating factors and clauses that can be in these sorts of things but what would be the general approach to handling that situation?

I have never found a pleasing way to answer the concern "What happens if Autodesk disappears in X time? Under this model I can't continue to use EAGLE" though I'm still trying to find an answer. It seems to me that there is a direct parallel between the hypothetical situation above and when EAGLE users tell us that they don't want to be hosed if Autodesk closes shop. What's the difference? Why do your customers feel OK entering into these contracts with that same possibility looming, but some EAGLE users don't feel comfortable with the long term prospect of Autodesk. I'm having trouble seeing the difference between both scenarios.

If anyone can enlighten me I would really appreciate it.

Thanks for the attention guys.

Best Regards,
Jorge Garcia
 

Offline capt bullshot

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Re: Why is everybody ranting about Autodesk's Subscription-Model?
« Reply #17 on: November 16, 2017, 07:49:33 am »
[Let's say you have a customer and they enter into a contract with you where they will purchase X amount of product for the next 15 years, so you must now guarantee support for the product for that time frame. What happens if for whatever reason you have to close up shop 8 years into the contract? I know there are a lot of extenuating factors and clauses that can be in these sorts of things but what would be the general approach to handling that situation?

That's a common situation in some businesses: My customer will ask me to, say quarterly or monthly, archive everything that is necessary to continue producing and supporting the product and deposit the whole shebang at a trusted custodian or notary. Customer might inspect the contents of the archive to ensure its completeness, but he doesn't get access to it. Contracts will be set up, so in case of my shop going out of business, the customer gets access to all the archive and (if necessary) hardware from my shop, so he can continue production and support on his own or with some other shop of his choice.
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Offline VEGETA

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Re: Why is everybody ranting about Autodesk's Subscription-Model?
« Reply #18 on: November 16, 2017, 08:13:36 am »
Eagle was the standard for open source maker movement and have done that job pretty decently for various reasons. However, being cloud based (or need internal) + need subscription just kills it.

It doesn't have the features to compete with others such as CircuitStudio and Diptrace for example. If I want to buy a PCB software, then CircuitStudio is the go-to choice. Amazing software for kinda reasonable price.

In my opinion, now KiCAD is taking Eagle's place as open source standard since it is actually fully open source and has pretty much all Eagle features and maybe more.

Another big player is CircuitMaker but this one lacks the feature of saving the file... So you need to login then use the project, not to mention it is not a lightweight software.

 

Offline Karel

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Re: Why is everybody ranting about Autodesk's Subscription-Model?
« Reply #19 on: November 16, 2017, 08:19:53 am »
Basically, it boils down to this:

Autodesk does not trust his customers but the customers must trust autodesk...
The difference between theory and practice is less in theory than
the difference between theory and practice in practice.
Expensive tools cannot compensate for lack of experience.
 

Offline Karel

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Re: Why is everybody ranting about Autodesk's Subscription-Model?
« Reply #20 on: November 16, 2017, 08:25:04 am »
Eagle was the standard for open source maker movement and have done that job pretty decently for various reasons. However, being cloud based (or need internal) + need subscription just kills it.

It doesn't have the features to compete with others such as CircuitStudio and Diptrace for example. If I want to buy a PCB software, then CircuitStudio is the go-to choice. Amazing software for kinda reasonable price.

In my opinion, now KiCAD is taking Eagle's place as open source standard since it is actually fully open source and has pretty much all Eagle features and maybe more.

Another big player is CircuitMaker but this one lacks the feature of saving the file... So you need to login then use the project, not to mention it is not a lightweight software.

I would say, Eagle was okay for hobbyists and small companies.
Now, hobbyists use Kicad and small companies use Altium Designer.
The difference between theory and practice is less in theory than
the difference between theory and practice in practice.
Expensive tools cannot compensate for lack of experience.
 

Offline woody

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Re: Why is everybody ranting about Autodesk's Subscription-Model?
« Reply #21 on: November 16, 2017, 08:29:51 am »
I don't know.  For me it is also a simple monetary issue. I looked it up, I use a paid version of Eagle since December 2001. Started with the 'light' version, V3. Over the course of 16 years I paid nearly €1500,- in total for upgrades and updates, to end up with Pro V7 Layout + Schematic + Autorouter for Windows, Linux and Mac. So in total using Eagle cost me less than €99,- per year. It grew while I grew. I expanded and upgraded when I needed bigger boards or liked new features. And sometimes I skipped a silly upgrade (I seem to remember some mishap in V6?)

That same €99,- / year would buy me the use of the current Standard version. I cannot use that version, as I have a couple of boards that are a lot bigger. So I have to sign up for the Premium version, that will cost me in 3 years what I used to shell out in 15 years. You call it a good deal, I find extortion a better moniker. The subscription based model leaves me completely at the whims of the supplier. I have no choice if and when Autodesk decides that $999,- a year is an even better price for Premium. I either pay and shut up, or stop paying and lose access to my data.

I always liked Eagle for the headstrong software that it was. Made by people that had a clear idea on how they would like to see their EDA package function. You didn't like it? Fine, go get something else! Funnily enough I find that Kicad gives me that very same feeling. So I switched. And, as stated elsewhere, I do realize this is a rearguard action for SAAS is the bright and shining future. Does not mean I have to like it  ;)
« Last Edit: November 16, 2017, 08:35:44 am by woody »
 

Offline Karel

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Re: Why is everybody ranting about Autodesk's Subscription-Model?
« Reply #22 on: November 16, 2017, 08:33:21 am »
Can the free version be installed and used without internet connection and also in case the autodesk servers are offline for more than 14 days?
1) Install EAGLE freeware
2) Sign in with your Autodesk credentials

Once the credentials are accepted you can literally disconnect the computer from WIFI, ethernet, etc.

So, the answer is no. You can not install and run the free version without internet connection or without the autodesk servers up and running.

Thank you for clearing that up Jorge.
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Online daqq

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Re: Why is everybody ranting about Autodesk's Subscription-Model?
« Reply #23 on: November 16, 2017, 08:38:01 am »
Quote
I'm just curious what the REAL reasons are why people are ranting so much about the 'new' eagle subscription model.
A) This has been discussed previously.
B) I'd sum it up as follows: While offering nothing of worth in return, autodesk changes the terms under which you can use more up to date versions of a product you bought previously and were happy to pay for future updates (if needed). While it was well within their rights to do so, it was a dick move of epic proportions.
C) If you have to ask this question you would not understand the answer. Basically, a cloud/always-online/mandatory subscription model is a model, where the customer always gets the shitty end of the stick.
D) see: http://www.eevblog.com/forum/altium/altium-buys-upverter/msg1290396/#msg1290396
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Re: Why is everybody ranting about Autodesk's Subscription-Model?
« Reply #24 on: November 16, 2017, 08:42:00 am »
Because I want to OWN my license, not lease one. It's an asset to me.
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