Author Topic: Degree necessary for EE field?  (Read 32489 times)

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Offline Galenbo

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Re: Degree necessary for EE field?
« Reply #100 on: July 29, 2015, 11:28:13 pm »
In Australia,there are two levels of nurses---one level have Degrees,the other level don't.
And a "Doctor" is normally just a Bachelor of Medicine---they are not Doctors in the University sense!

So that's completely different from here.

The doctor/arts has an University degree (7 years)
Nurse diplomas exists in 2 major categories. Secondary and Bachelor.

People without degree do the cleaning of the rooms and transport patient beds between departments.

There exists something that could be translated as assistant-nurse, the cannot inject/give pills/other, but even that requires a diploma.
« Last Edit: July 29, 2015, 11:37:46 pm by Galenbo »
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Offline vk6zgo

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Re: Degree necessary for EE field?
« Reply #101 on: July 30, 2015, 04:03:40 pm »
In Australia,there are two levels of nurses---one level have Degrees,the other level don't.
And a "Doctor" is normally just a Bachelor of Medicine---they are not Doctors in the University sense!

So that's completely different from here.

The doctor/arts has an University degree (7 years)
Nurse diplomas exists in 2 major categories. Secondary and Bachelor.

People without degree do the cleaning of the rooms and transport patient beds between departments.

There exists something that could be translated as assistant-nurse, the cannot inject/give pills/other, but even that requires a diploma.

I did not mean to imply that the "Doctor" who looks after you medically doesn't have a University Degree.
He/She is usually "A Bachelor of Medicine".

Most GPs don't have a Doctorate as the title is used in other fields--"Doctor of Philosophy","Doctor of Science","Doctor of Divinity",etc.

Re Nurses:- In my home State of Western Australia,there are two levels of Nurses,both of which can add extra oroficiencies as they progress through their careers.

Enrolled Nurse:- These Nurses have a Diploma from a TAFE College or similar qualifications.
Registered Nurse:-RNs have a Bachelor of Nursing Degree from a University.


A "Nurse Practitioner" is a a RN who has achieved the Degree of "Master of Nursing" at University.
 

Offline Galenbo

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Re: Degree necessary for EE field?
« Reply #102 on: July 30, 2015, 11:36:12 pm »
I did not mean to imply that the "Doctor" who looks after you medically doesn't have a University Degree.
He/She is usually "A Bachelor of Medicine".
Most GPs don't have a Doctorate as the title is used in other fields--"Doctor of Philosophy","Doctor of Science","Doctor of Divinity",etc.

It gets very messy with all those terms...

In our region, university degree implies a master.
All "doctors" have that, but indeed Doctorate is completely another thing.

If you try and take a cat apart to see how it works, the first thing you have on your hands is a nonworking cat.
 

Offline tggzzz

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Re: Degree necessary for EE field?
« Reply #103 on: July 31, 2015, 12:24:27 am »
In our region, university degree implies a master.
All "doctors" have that, but indeed Doctorate is completely another thing.
Here a "doctorate" can mean two things. The usual PhD, or a DSc which requires decades of sustained achievement  and publications.
There are lies, damned lies, statistics - and ADC/DAC specs.
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Offline MagicSmoker

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Re: Degree necessary for EE field?
« Reply #104 on: August 05, 2015, 01:16:21 am »
...My problem with the 'traditional' educational institutes was that i had to learn the same stuff over and over again  ( plus oodles of stuff i had no interest in learning )...

This was my first problem with [a well-regarded engineering university] in the early 90's...


I went to an American school for engineering and all I remember is hell. There were about ten times the number of students who wanted to major in EE than there were places for them. It was pure competition. It seemed like every class was there to weed people out. Boredom was not a problem, fear was.

...and that was my second problem.


Thus I am self-taught (or, for a more pretentious way of saying it: an auto-didact). I am reluctant to call myself an EE - I believe that one should have the little piece of paper that goes with the title - but seeing as I've designed high power Class A & D audio amplifiers; Class C & E RF amplifiers (including a real gem - a 10kW RF exciter for a CO2 laser [that approach is now obsolete]); switchmode power supplies of all topologies up to ~2kW and motor drives up to power levels of 1.6MW (that's mega, not milli), I feel like I am fairly competent at what I do. Oh, and I can get ethernet to work inside one of those 1.6MW drives. Take that EMC bitches!

 

Offline janengelbrecht

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Re: Degree necessary for EE field?
« Reply #105 on: August 14, 2015, 03:20:23 am »
When you start out in the business...EE degree is helpful. Later on....when your degree is like 20-30 years old...no one cares at least about your grades :P


Offline tggzzz

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Re: Degree necessary for EE field?
« Reply #106 on: August 14, 2015, 03:32:58 am »
When you start out in the business...EE degree is helpful. Later on....when your degree is like 20-30 years old...no one cares at least about your grades :P

That depends on what type of job you are aiming at, and when.

For most of my jobs, and certainly all of the good/fun ones, a good degree was absolutely essential. I know for a fact I wouldn't have reached the interview stage without it. I know that since I was intimately involved in all aspects of the the recruitment processes for several years in several jobs.

Having a solid track record of achievement (even before my first "real" job) was also essential.

That certainly can be the case for the 10-15 years after a degree. But I will agree that near retirement (i.e. after 30 years) it is less likely to be relevant :)

Simple point: you are competing against people with a degree. Idiot HR-droids will use any uncontestable fact (whether or not it is relevant) to reduce the pile of CVs and enable them to protect their back against later complaints.

There are lies, damned lies, statistics - and ADC/DAC specs.
Gliding aphorism: "there is no substitute for span". Retort: "There is a substitute: skill+imagination. But you can buy span".
Having fun doing more, with less
 

Online CatalinaWOW

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Re: Degree necessary for EE field?
« Reply #107 on: August 14, 2015, 04:53:11 am »
When you start out in the business...EE degree is helpful. Later on....when your degree is like 20-30 years old...no one cares at least about your grades :P

Agreed.  And for many (maybe most) of those I worked with all of the courses taken are long forgotten.  But it was my observation that a majority of those who made it to the top of the heap remembered and applied everything they had been exposed to, from university on.
 

Offline tggzzz

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Re: Degree necessary for EE field?
« Reply #108 on: August 14, 2015, 08:04:42 am »
When you start out in the business...EE degree is helpful. Later on....when your degree is like 20-30 years old...no one cares at least about your grades :P

Agreed.  And for many (maybe most) of those I worked with all of the courses taken are long forgotten.  But it was my observation that a majority of those who made it to the top of the heap remembered and applied everything they had been exposed to, from university on.

Yes indeed. Very true, and probably not understood by those that have not (quite possibly through deliberate choice) made it to the top of the heap.

Nicely put.
There are lies, damned lies, statistics - and ADC/DAC specs.
Gliding aphorism: "there is no substitute for span". Retort: "There is a substitute: skill+imagination. But you can buy span".
Having fun doing more, with less
 

Offline MT

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Re: Degree necessary for EE field?
« Reply #109 on: August 22, 2015, 07:20:39 am »
When you start out in the business...EE degree is helpful. Later on....when your degree is like 20-30 years old...no one cares at least about your grades :P

Yes, grades is like best before date on milk bottles! The real problem in the industry is the HR people and their attitudes and their backgrounds and their;
we are going to rule the world, mentality.
 

Offline old gregg

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Re: Degree necessary for EE field?
« Reply #110 on: August 24, 2015, 05:03:17 am »
I had an experience recently. If you can bypass the Human ressources, you've a chance otherwise you're kind of screwed. Most of them don't know what you're talking about, they want "a profil" more than anything else. Sometimes it becomes annoying and such a waste of time. 

The guy I had on the phone just wanted to have the work done and didn't care for the degree/diplomas. Do the job and do it well.

So "It depends" (that expression must be the "engineering Mantra"  ;D). Hope isn't lost.
« Last Edit: August 24, 2015, 09:29:43 am by old gregg »
 

Offline gb243

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Re: Degree necessary for EE field?
« Reply #111 on: December 17, 2015, 12:48:30 am »
That is almost entirely different to my EE degree course, which was ~90% hardcore electronic/computing.

In fact, I would suggest to any American students looking for an engineering degree program to consider studying in the UK. The fees will be relatively modest compared to many US private universities and you will get to spend much more time learning what you are interested in.

Personally I would avoid the UK. I got my degree in EE there but it is now a very expensive destination for education. Much of Europe degree level education is free or only a few hundred Euro per year. The courses are usually taught in english in an environment which is clean and safe. I emigrated a few years ago and nothing would entice me back.
 


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