Author Topic: Perverse Language  (Read 27673 times)

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Offline PsychoMaster

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Perverse Language
« on: February 10, 2015, 09:50:59 pm »
Hi I thought a subject which really bugs me might make a blogg and that is the Americans using the word "SODDERING". If you go around doing that you are likely to get arrested.Please let the poor souls know that the word has a letter "L" in it .
 

Offline Richard Crowley

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Re: Perverse Language
« Reply #1 on: February 10, 2015, 10:38:42 pm »
So why do you guys pronounce the "L" in SOME words but not in others?
Even BrEnglish has words with "sllent-L".  BFD   :=\
 

Offline Simon

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Re: Perverse Language
« Reply #2 on: February 10, 2015, 11:10:25 pm »
Any part of the world has different ways of pronouncing things, even different parts of the same country........ Have you lived under a rock all of your life ?
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Offline EEVblog

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Re: Perverse Language
« Reply #3 on: February 10, 2015, 11:59:18 pm »
Hi I thought a subject which really bugs me might make a blogg and that is the Americans using the word "SODDERING". If you go around doing that you are likely to get arrested.Please let the poor souls know that the word has a letter "L" in it .

The Yanks can call it anything they like, we'll just continue to make fun of them  :-DD
 

Offline Tac Eht Xilef

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Re: Perverse Language
« Reply #4 on: February 11, 2015, 12:08:23 am »
Hi I thought a subject which really bugs me might make a blogg and that is the Americans using the word "SODDERING". If you go around doing that you are likely to get arrested.Please let the poor souls know that the word has a letter "L" in it .

Of course, the non-jokey answer is that there's some interesting etymology behind the difference between the UK/AU/etc pronunciation and the US/NA pronunciation, and (arguably) "sodder" or "so-der" is the more original (and therefore more correct, according to some) pronunciation.

Mind you, that's not going to stop me laughing at people who leave the "l" out...  :-DD
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Offline miguelvp

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Re: Perverse Language
« Reply #5 on: February 11, 2015, 04:46:04 pm »
I'll leave this in here :)


 

Offline Falcon69

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Re: Perverse Language
« Reply #6 on: February 11, 2015, 04:46:48 pm »
I live in the USA, and I have wondered about this very subject. The English language is really messed up.  WHY is the word small so big yet the word big is so small?  It is confusing.
 

Offline tggzzz

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Re: Perverse Language
« Reply #7 on: February 11, 2015, 09:35:11 pm »
I first came across this in 1990...

Multi-national personnel at North Atlantic Treaty Organization headquarters
 near Paris found English to be an easy language ...  until they tried to
 pronounce it.  To help them discard an array of accents, the verses below
 were devised.  After trying them, a Frenchman said he'd prefer six months at
 hard labor to reading six lines aloud.  Try them yourself.
 
       ENGLISH IS TOUGH STUFF
        ======================
 
       Dearest creature in creation,
       Study English pronunciation.
       I will teach you in my verse
       Sounds like corpse, corps, horse, and worse.
       I will keep you, Suzy, busy,
       Make your head with heat grow dizzy.
       Tear in eye, your dress will tear.
       So shall I!  Oh hear my prayer.
 
       Just compare heart, beard, and heard,
       Dies and diet, lord and word,
       Sword and sward, retain and Britain.
       (Mind the latter, how it's written.)
       Now I surely will not plague you
       With such words as plaque and ague.
       But be careful how you speak:
       Say break and steak, but bleak and streak;
       Cloven, oven, how and low,
       Script, receipt, show, poem, and toe.
 
       Hear me say, devoid of trickery,
       Daughter, laughter, and Terpsichore,
       Typhoid, measles, topsails, aisles,
       Exiles, similes, and reviles;
       Scholar, vicar, and cigar,
       Solar, mica, war and far;
       One, anemone, Balmoral,
       Kitchen, lichen, laundry, laurel;
       Gertrude, German, wind and mind,
       Scene, Melpomene, mankind.
 
       Billet does not rhyme with ballet,
       Bouquet, wallet, mallet, chalet.
       Blood and flood are not like food,
       Nor is mould like should and would.
       Viscous, viscount, load and broad,
       Toward, to forward, to reward.
       And your pronunciation's OK
       When you correctly say croquet,
       Rounded, wounded, grieve and sieve,
       Friend and fiend, alive and live.
 
       Ivy, privy, famous; clamour
       And enamour rhyme with hammer.
       River, rival, tomb, bomb, comb,
       Doll and roll and some and home.
       Stranger does not rhyme with anger,
       Neither does devour with clangour.
       Souls but foul, haunt but aunt,
       Font, front, wont, want, grand, and grant,
       Shoes, goes, does.  Now first say finger,
       And then singer, ginger, linger,
       Real, zeal, mauve, gauze, gouge and gauge,
       Marriage, foliage, mirage, and age.
 
       Query does not rhyme with very,
       Nor does fury sound like bury.
       Dost, lost, post and doth, cloth, loth.
       Job, nob, bosom, transom, oath.
       Though the differences seem little,
       We say actual but victual.
       Refer does not rhyme with deafer.
       Foeffer does, and zephyr, heifer.
       Mint, pint, senate and sedate;
       Dull, bull, and George ate late.
       Scenic, Arabic, Pacific,
       Science, conscience, scientific.
 
       Liberty, library, heave and heaven,
       Rachel, ache, moustache, eleven.
       We say hallowed, but allowed,
       People, leopard, towed, but vowed.
       Mark the differences, moreover,
       Between mover, cover, clover;
       Leeches, breeches, wise, precise,
       Chalice, but police and lice;
       Camel, constable, unstable,
       Principle, disciple, label.
 
       Petal, panel, and canal,
       Wait, surprise, plait, promise, pal.
       Worm and storm, chaise, chaos, chair,
       Senator, spectator, mayor.
       Tour, but our and succour, four.
       Gas, alas, and Arkansas.
       Sea, idea, Korea, area,
       Psalm, Maria, but malaria.
       Youth, south, southern, cleanse and clean.
       Doctrine, turpentine, marine.
 
       Compare alien with Italian,
       Dandelion and battalion.
       Sally with ally, yea, ye,
       Eye, I, ay, aye, whey, and key.
       Say aver, but ever, fever,
       Neither, leisure, skein, deceiver.
       Heron, granary, canary.
       Crevice and device and aerie.
 
       Face, but preface, not efface.
       Phlegm, phlegmatic, ass, glass, bass.
       Large, but target, gin, give, verging,
       Ought, out, joust and scour, scourging.
       Ear, but earn and wear and tear
       Do not rhyme with here but ere.
       Seven is right, but so is even,
       Hyphen, roughen, nephew Stephen,
       Monkey, donkey, Turk and jerk,
       Ask, grasp, wasp, and cork and work.
 
       Pronunciation -- think of Psyche!
       Is a paling stout and spikey?
       Won't it make you lose your wits,
       Writing groats and saying grits?
       It's a dark abyss or tunnel:
       Strewn with stones, stowed, solace, gunwale,
       Islington and Isle of Wight,
       Housewife, verdict and indict.
 
       Finally, which rhymes with enough --
       Though, through, plough, or dough, or cough?
       Hiccough has the sound of cup.
       My advice is to give up!!!
 
 
                       -- Author Unknown
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Offline PsychoMaster

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Re: Perverse Language
« Reply #8 on: February 11, 2015, 09:57:21 pm »
I f they like well it,s up to them I suppose.But it's not English is it?
I managed to learn it and I,m not over bright.I bet that gets no surprises.
 

Offline steve_w

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Re: Perverse Language
« Reply #9 on: February 11, 2015, 10:26:15 pm »
Falcon,

I see your NZ deck and raise you an American deck.

enjoy

So long and thanks for all the fish
 

Offline george graves

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Re: Perverse Language
« Reply #10 on: February 11, 2015, 10:47:14 pm »
Any part of the world has different ways of pronouncing things, even different parts of the same country........ Have you lived under a rock all of your life ?

 :-DD

Offline Yago

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Re: Perverse Language
« Reply #11 on: February 12, 2015, 11:19:35 am »
The Aluminium, Aluminum story is pretty funny.
 

Offline elgonzo

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Re: Perverse Language
« Reply #12 on: February 12, 2015, 12:07:13 pm »
Or "soccer" vs. "football" story...

Everybody blames the Americans for using the word "soccer".
First, the word is actually British.
Second, the 'mericans are actually correct in using the word "soccer".
 

Offline apelly

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Re: Perverse Language
« Reply #13 on: February 12, 2015, 12:30:34 pm »
I have a mate who works in forestry. He points out it's odd to chop a tree down then chop it up.
I'd rather a Google clue, link, or some theory than "do this" (generally)
 

Offline xrunner

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Re: Perverse Language
« Reply #14 on: February 12, 2015, 12:39:26 pm »
Hi I thought a subject which really bugs me might make a blogg and that is the Americans using the word "SODDERING". If you go around doing that you are likely to get arrested.Please let the poor souls know that the word has a letter "L" in it .

Ahem ...

Quote
Solder

[sod-er] <-- Pronunciation
 noun
1.
any of various alloys fused and applied to the joint between metal objects to unite them without heating the objects to the melting point.

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/solder?s=t

Quote
solder
noun   /sad·er/  <-- Pronunciation

a type of soft metal that is melted to join separate metal parts which are then permanently attached when the metal cools

http://dictionary.cambridge.org/us/dictionary/american-english/solder
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Offline Nerull

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Re: Perverse Language
« Reply #15 on: February 12, 2015, 03:05:05 pm »
I f they like well it,s up to them I suppose.But it's not English is it?
I managed to learn it and I,m not over bright.I bet that gets no surprises.

Who defines English? Do you know how languages work? It may shock you to learn that language varies over geological regions and time and is not a rigid thing set in stone. Solder comes from French, where it does not have an L sound. The English word didn't have an L sound either, as demonstrated by old British dictionaries from the 1800s, but eventually enough people starting pronouncing the L that it stuck. In a way, the British pronunciation is the corrupted one.

In reality it doesn't really matter, because regional dialects are an accepted part of language and are not "wrong".
« Last Edit: February 12, 2015, 03:24:29 pm by Nerull »
 

Offline Whales

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Re: Perverse Language
« Reply #16 on: February 12, 2015, 07:34:12 pm »
Quote from: xrunner
Ahem ...
Quote
[sod-er] <-- Pronunciation
Quote
noun /sad·er/  <-- Pronunciation]

 :wtf:

I thought it was a minority of Americans what pronounced it this way.  Perhaps not?
 

Offline LightlyDoped

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Re: Perverse Language
« Reply #17 on: February 13, 2015, 02:55:48 pm »
Hi I thought a subject which really bugs me might make a blogg and that is the Americans using the word "SODDERING". If you go around doing that you are likely to get arrested.Please let the poor souls know that the word has a letter "L" in it .

How do you pronounce "should" or "could?" But I will pronounce the "L" in "Albert Park" when the 2015 Formula 1 season opens with the Grand Prix of Australia on March 15.
 

Offline c4757p

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Re: Perverse Language
« Reply #18 on: February 13, 2015, 03:14:00 pm »
Quote from: xrunner
Ahem ...
Quote
[sod-er] <-- Pronunciation
Quote
noun /sad·er/  <-- Pronunciation]

 :wtf:

I thought it was a minority of Americans what pronounced it this way.  Perhaps not?

No, the vast majority do not pronounce the L. To the point where I'd say "all" if I didn't know better...
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Offline Stonent

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Re: Perverse Language
« Reply #19 on: February 14, 2015, 04:46:34 am »
Salmon...

Sa-mon, or Sal-mon?

The larger the government, the smaller the citizen.
 

Offline c4757p

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Re: Perverse Language
« Reply #20 on: February 14, 2015, 04:48:43 am »
No longer active here - try the IRC channel if you just can't be without me :)
 

Offline Richard Crowley

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Re: Perverse Language
« Reply #21 on: February 14, 2015, 04:51:03 am »
Salmon...
Sa-mon, or Sal-mon?

Do you mean Salman Rushdie?  Famous author and fatwa target?
Or Solomon, 3rd king of Israel?
 

Offline DIPLover

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Re: Perverse Language
« Reply #22 on: February 14, 2015, 08:23:32 am »
I'm OK with soh'der, why not? Maybe it started in Boston?

What TRULY needs an explanation is "Worcestershire Sauce" being called Worster Sauce...  :-//
 

Offline Alex Eisenhut

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Re: Perverse Language
« Reply #23 on: February 14, 2015, 08:35:24 am »
What boggles my mind is:

Tektronics
Techtronix
TekTronics

It's
Tektronix

It's right there on the front panel.
 

Offline zapta

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Re: Perverse Language
« Reply #24 on: February 14, 2015, 11:06:48 am »
I live in the USA, and I have wondered about this very subject. The English language is really messed up.  WHY is the word small so big yet the word big is so small?  It is confusing.

.. and we park in the driveway and drive in the parkway.
Drain the swamp.
 


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