Author Topic: 4520, V4520D, and M74HC4520 vs 4520  (Read 1692 times)

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Offline Electro Fan

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4520, V4520D, and M74HC4520 vs 4520
« on: November 01, 2015, 06:34:28 PM »
Are all 4520 chips consider "dual" binary counters, or is there a version that is a "single" binary counter?

When a 4520 is stamped with V4520D, what if anything meaningful does the V and D signify?
 
What is the difference between a M74HC4520 and a 4520?  Same chip with two different numbers or different chips?

Thanks
 

Offline Paul Moir

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Re: 4520, V4520D, and M74HC4520 vs 4520
« Reply #1 on: November 01, 2015, 07:58:36 PM »
Quote

What is the difference between a M74HC4520 and a 4520?  Same chip with two different numbers or different chips?

Different chips.  The 4520 is traditional 4000 series while the 74HC is a TTLish CMOS version, which is much more modern.  Google CD4520 for the TI traditional cmos part.  The big differences:  CD4520 has a much higher supply voltage range, is much slower, and has much less drive current capabilities.

There's a bunch of counters in the 4000 series if you only want a single.  Some have more bits or are presetable.  Depends on what you're after.

The V and D would be manufacturer dependant (whoever they were), but to me it looks like a straight up traditional CMOS 4520.

(Perhaps a little history helps.  When the 7400 "HC" CMOS series variants came out there was now an opportunity to merge the 4000 series in with them since the technology was essentially the same.  They just tacked on the familiar 4000 part number onto the 74HC sequence.  So the venerable 4046 PLL which people were familiar with was available now as a 74HC4046, with some very much improved specs.  Before this wasn't possible because the previous versions of the 7400 series used bipolar transistors.)

« Last Edit: November 01, 2015, 08:09:07 PM by Paul Moir »
 

Offline bktemp

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Re: 4520, V4520D, and M74HC4520 vs 4520
« Reply #2 on: November 01, 2015, 08:21:42 PM »
When a 4520 is stamped with V4520D, what if anything meaningful does the V and D signify?
It means this ic was made by RFT mikroelektronik:
http://www.semicon-data.com/oem/rf/rf_117.html

The prefix commonly indicates the manufacturer.
 

Offline Electro Fan

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Re: 4520, V4520D, and M74HC4520 vs 4520
« Reply #3 on: November 01, 2015, 11:37:30 PM »
When a 4520 is stamped with V4520D, what if anything meaningful does the V and D signify?
It means this ic was made by RFT mikroelektronik:
http://www.semicon-data.com/oem/rf/rf_117.html

The prefix commonly indicates the manufacturer.

Thanks.  If the prefix is the manufacturer is there a typical meaning for the suffix letter?
 

Offline Electro Fan

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Re: 4520, V4520D, and M74HC4520 vs 4520
« Reply #4 on: November 01, 2015, 11:49:52 PM »
Quote

What is the difference between a M74HC4520 and a 4520?  Same chip with two different numbers or different chips?

Different chips.  The 4520 is traditional 4000 series while the 74HC is a TTLish CMOS version, which is much more modern.  Google CD4520 for the TI traditional cmos part.  The big differences:  CD4520 has a much higher supply voltage range, is much slower, and has much less drive current capabilities.

There's a bunch of counters in the 4000 series if you only want a single.  Some have more bits or are presetable.  Depends on what you're after.

The V and D would be manufacturer dependant (whoever they were), but to me it looks like a straight up traditional CMOS 4520.

(Perhaps a little history helps.  When the 7400 "HC" CMOS series variants came out there was now an opportunity to merge the 4000 series in with them since the technology was essentially the same.  They just tacked on the familiar 4000 part number onto the 74HC sequence.  So the venerable 4046 PLL which people were familiar with was available now as a 74HC4046, with some very much improved specs.  Before this wasn't possible because the previous versions of the 7400 series used bipolar transistors.)

Thanks for the explanations - and I appreciate the history too.  Thx!

If I want to replicate a simple 4520 4 bit counter circuit but don't need to retain the particular voltage, current, or speed of the 4520 can I assume that functionality-wise the circuit will still run if I use the same pins on a 74HC4520?  Thx

 

Offline bktemp

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Re: 4520, V4520D, and M74HC4520 vs 4520
« Reply #5 on: November 02, 2015, 12:55:50 AM »
If the prefix is the manufacturer is there a typical meaning for the suffix letter?
It depends on the manufacturer and ic family.
For example for 4000series logic ics the suffix UB means unbuffered, so it is a special version of the inverter without the additional input and output buffers normally used.
Other suffixes are the package type.
Most datasheets describe the meaning of each digit in the part number, but you first need to identify the manufacturer to find the correct datasheet.
 

Offline Electro Fan

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Re: 4520, V4520D, and M74HC4520 vs 4520
« Reply #6 on: November 02, 2015, 06:41:36 PM »
If the prefix is the manufacturer is there a typical meaning for the suffix letter?
It depends on the manufacturer and ic family.
For example for 4000series logic ics the suffix UB means unbuffered, so it is a special version of the inverter without the additional input and output buffers normally used.
Other suffixes are the package type.
Most datasheets describe the meaning of each digit in the part number, but you first need to identify the manufacturer to find the correct datasheet.

Thanks - figure out the manufacturer with the prefix, then examine the suffix to determine the version - sounds like a good method :)
« Last Edit: November 03, 2015, 04:27:38 PM by Electro Fan »
 


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