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I just grabbed a complimentary copy from Altronics. I was going to pay for it with my order but they said it was a 1st edition complimentary copy on the house. Previously I tried to get one from the news stands but could not find any. The sales guy alluded that this mag was way ahead of the competition. Interesting times ;)

cheers
2
General Chat / Re: Test Equipment Anonymous (TEA) group therapy thread
« Last post by bitseeker on Today at 11:55:57 AM »
I hadn't bought TE for a while (more than 1.5 months), but then an HP 3469A came along. Not that I need another DMM (bench or handheld), but it's different, came with a printed operating/service manual, and the price was right. So, now I have too many + 1 multimeters.
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Projects, Designs, and Technical Stuff / Re: Bullshit Alarm
« Last post by blueskull on Today at 11:55:51 AM »
There seems to be lot of BS like that in even the pro audio industry.   Was sourcing out equipment for my church and saw a lot of amps that had a rating higher than 1800w, which makes no sense as that would max out a 15 amp outlet, which this stuff is typically designed to plug into.

Suppose there is probably some "truth" their their statements, they probably mean that the amps could in theory handle that without blowing.  But it's still very misleading to the average consumer.

Any serious audio gear buyer should know PMPO and the law of energy conservation. If you drive an amp between rated average power and PMPO for a long time (say, PSU can source 1kW, amp is designed for 500W operation, and PMPO is 3kW, you drive it at 800W), most WILL blow up or go to thermal protection. Rarely there are non thermally triggered electrical protection for amps. When it comes to linear BJT and (only) thermally triggered protection, blow up happens from time to time.
4
Not accepted I'm afraid. Keysight will sell you or I a multi-thousand dollar piece of gear with no problem. One oscilloscope. One DMM. One spectrum analyzer. To one individual.
A lot of the "small" sales like that will go through a distributor, not directly. Your distributor should be able to order parts easily for you as they are already setup and routinely order shipments. Or be happy you're in the US and offered direct access to the parts sales unlike the rest of the world.

Which means you get to chuck the price listed by Keysight out the window and brace yourself for a wallet thrashing from the distributor.

5
Ordering parts from Canada is easy - it is telephone only though. The only catch is you gotta spend 100 bucks. So while it is a pain in the US it would have hurt more if that knob had been 100 bucks...

That's normally not so hard to do. They wanted almost $15 apiece for replacement binding posts to fix my E3610A (thanks, but no). I'm actually surprised this knob was only $1.99
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Microcontrollers & FPGAs / Re: Moving into 32-bit MCU
« Last post by blueskull on Today at 11:50:40 AM »
For example in the other thread over there was a lot of discussion about WCH and Allwinner chips. I know these move in high volume (Allwinner especially), but again they are not available at any distributors I buy from. Does that mean they are unpopular? Or does it just mean that you'd have to be in China to be exposed to that ecosystem?

They are supposed to be used in ultra cheap devices as MPU. If you factor in R&D cost (due to poor documentation and barely hacked up Linux kernel) and logistics cost (to send someone to China just to purchase and do local QA) as well as patent cost (to be legally imported to western world), they are not that cheaper compared with NXP/FS MPUs.

One Chinese chip made the exception, ESP32, but so far that's the only one I know, with good BSP (though not Linux), English document and no legal issues (no known patent infringements, no known copyright issues, and they officially offers FCC certified modules).
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I look forward to when the Silicon Valley guys enter the real world of traffic.





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Projects, Designs, and Technical Stuff / Re: Bullshit Alarm
« Last post by Red Squirrel on Today at 11:47:24 AM »
There seems to be lot of BS like that in even the pro audio industry.   Was sourcing out equipment for my church and saw a lot of amps that had a rating higher than 1800w, which makes no sense as that would max out a 15 amp outlet, which this stuff is typically designed to plug into.

Suppose there is probably some "truth" their their statements, they probably mean that the amps could in theory handle that without blowing.  But it's still very misleading to the average consumer.
9
Test Equipment / Re: Atmel vs Pic in Linux environment
« Last post by igendel on Today at 11:45:29 AM »
For an easy start on Linux, I believe PIC is the better option. Despite the disadvantages, the MPLAB X IDE is still more comfortable than messing with command line, the free compiler is not bad for everyday uses, and you can get clone programmers that are much cheaper than Atmel ICE.

For playing around with PICs, there's also MPLAB Xpress, the online IDE. It generates the HEX file that you can burn directly to the MCU, or drag-and-drop if you have an MPLAB Xpress dev board.
10
Not accepted I'm afraid. Keysight will sell you or I a multi-thousand dollar piece of gear with no problem. One oscilloscope. One DMM. One spectrum analyzer. To one individual.
A lot of the "small" sales like that will go through a distributor, not directly. Your distributor should be able to order parts easily for you as they are already setup and routinely order shipments. Or be happy you're in the US and offered direct access to the parts sales unlike the rest of the world.
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