Recent Posts

Pages: [1] 2 3 4 5 6 ... 10 Next
1
Repair / Re: OCZ Vertex 2 SSD firmware
« Last post by DonCharisma on Today at 07:40:09 am »

I have one more question: Is anybody able to tell me which version of Sandforce SF 1222 firmware (or OCZ Vertex2 fw, as the OCZ fw numbering differs from original SF numbering) is fixing this "brick issue" (=prevents from bricking again)?

I have two Vertex 2 80GB, SF1222 ... latest firmware is v1.37 (as far as I know)

Thanks for the guide and links, I was able to revive one of the SSDs which I bricked after I "forgot" to switch off the sleep on my laptop - The laptop slept, the SSD never woke up again.

I'm not aware of a standalone way to flash the firmware. I think (although not sure), that this link downloads the latest firmware from OCZ (now Toshiba's) server :

http://update.ocztechnology.com/firmware/release/sf/p1/12222

(as referred to in this post - http://www.eevblog.com/forum/repair/ocz-vertex-2-ssd-firmware/msg565210/#msg565210 )

If someone knows how to (force) flash that, would be helpful, but obviously need to confirm it's the right file first.

By the looks of things, the OCZ server that provides Firmware update for older SSDs still is online (for how much longer, who knows). Firmware can be updated in linux using a download I found on Arch linux website  https://aur.archlinux.org/packages/ocztoolbox/ :

http://url.muflone.com/ocztoolbox-4.9.0.634_linux.tar.gz

Just download, extract and run the executable.

There are also versions of standalone OCZ Bootable tools, which is based on TinyCoreLinux. It's a bit more fiddly to setup, as you'd need to create a USB stick, that boots, then mounts and boots the .ISO file from the USB stick (the .ISO provided by OCZ doesn't include a bootloader !). What I think is the latest version can be downloaded here :

https://web.archive.org/web/20140716061012/http://ocz.com/consumer/download/firmware/OCZ_PC_Bootable_Tools-5.4.298_UUI.zip

AND, there's a Windows tool which still also seems to work (latest version I think) :

https://web.archive.org/web/20160320062612/http://ocz.com/consumer/download/firmware/OCZToolbox_v4.9.0.634_win32.zip


Regarding "MP Tool", it's quite fiddly, but it's really worth persevering with it, because eventually I managed to bring the SSD back, even though I was getting errors in the log window.

Of note is, if you want to at least try to update the firmware (or at least, for any of the OCZ tools to recognise the drive) with any of the above tools, you'd need to setup the Drive information a bit more precisely. Of note are :

"IEEE Company ID" - I believe this should be set to "E83A97" (The hex code for 'OCZ Technology Group')
"Increment" - I set to "0"
"Serial Number" - I wasn't able to get the WWN to match what my "good" drive reported in 'smartctl -a' ... anyway I just entered "fcd03878d", which is part of my serial number.
To confuse matters there's a decimal serial number printed on the SSD case, which doesn't seem to match the Hex one reported in smartctl -a
Maybe there's a setting somewhere in MP Tool to set it up correctly, never used it before, so I don't know.

And "Model Number" - I set to "OCZ-VERTEX2" (again what's reported in smartctl -a
And, also, I don't know if this makes any difference but I changed "Flash Connectivity Test" to False.

With my doing all these things I was able to get both *all* of OCZ tools suggested above to recognise the drive, but unfortunately, they all reported back the the drive had rejected the firmware update. As I can make use of the drive anyway, doesn't really matter, and I'm out of time now.

Hope this is helpful.
2
No I mean ferrite particles instead of iron particles, the stuff they sinter together to make inductors. Why would it have different performance in a matrix structure then iron powder? I think the domains would have a better frequency response then iron too. And it might be cheaper, more oxidation resistant, and lighter since its a alloy of zinc and nickle or whatever and its used in massive quantities, and I don't think its flamable like iron powder is.

I know if you use it solid its more fragile, but a powder is a powder?

I use word ferrite here for a ground magnetic cores.

Ferrite is actually a name for an allotrope of iron. It is iron, pure one.  Fine powder iron is mostly ferrite.
But, iron particles in cores are suspended in ceramic material. Which is good, because pure iron powder will become iron oxide very quickly.
Ceramic matrix in cores encapsulates and protects iron from oxidising. So it will keep it's magnetic properties. It also isolates particles from each other, preventing currents forming in core.
3
Test Equipment / Re: Siglent SDS1104X-E vs. Rigol DS1054Z Advice?
« Last post by tautech on Today at 07:39:45 am »
Uh oh. I might have found something useful in the SDS1104X-E's favor. It looks like that can handle 400VDC input according to the datasheet, and the Rigol only 300VDC. Am I reading that right?

Assuming I'm reading that right, that might be useful. Or should I be more interested in a differential scope for that voltage level? A few spots on my amps go above 300, usually not above 350 for most circuits I build. I dunno if I'd ever connect there, but, ya know...or never know.
The risk is if you should mistakenly use the probe on a 1:1 setting. Hence my mention earlier that some prefer fixed attenuation probes.
However when we go probing HV we should always double, er no...... triple check our setup.
4
I used to be a member of IEEE.  But unlike ACM where you can buy unlimited access to the digital library and SEG where it comes with membership, IEEE has literature access charges  for members which is simply unaffordable.

From the IEEE web site:

"IEEE members receive a discounted price of US$13 on single IEEE article purchases made through IEEE Xplore. Articles from partner publishers are US$33 per article."

or if you prefer volume pricing:

"Access all the IEEE content you need to explore ideas and develop better technology with 25 article downloads every calendar month for just US$44.00 per month. Plus, roll over up to 10 unused downloads into the following month for a maximum of 35 downloads."

I generally collect a lot of papers when I'm working on a project.  But it's bursty.  I can easily go over the 25 paper limit in a couple of hours.  But then I might not want more papers for several months.  Either way it's a lot of money.  My normal practice is to get a dozen or so recent papers, read them and get the important references. read those and get the important references.  A lot of papers turn out to be useless, but until you read it, there is no way to know.

Unfortunately, SPE has similar policies on literature access.  It seems to be an engineering society practice.  The scientific societies I've belonged to provided much better literature access to their members.  After the company where I worked for 6 years as a contractor closed their library I was spending around $1500 a year for society memberships to get literature access.
5
Projects, Designs, and Technical Stuff / Re: Problem with DIY dimmer
« Last post by panoss on Today at 07:37:35 am »
Ok but after all this I still don 't know how to 'evaluate' this circuit. To say if it 's good or bad, or to say how good it is, what should be improved and how the internal diode of the soldering iron affects on it 's functionality.

To check if it works as expected I should check the duration of conduction of the TRIAC in a period.
This is what I did (please tell if it 's the correct way).

I removed the directive '.step param X blah blah...'.
I entered manually the value for R1=1k.
I run the simulation and measured the time the TRIAC conducted (take a look at the attachment).

(I repeated the process for other values of R1):

f=50Hz->f=1/T->T=1/f->T=1/50Hz=0.02s, convert to ms:0.02S*1000=20ms.
D = PW/T.
1k->1.42ms  D = PW/T=1.42ms/20ms=0.071=7.1%
3k-1.69ms
6k->2.03ms
10k->2.42ms
15k->2.8ms
30k->3.81ms
50k->4.93ms
70k->4.67ms
90k->6.64ms D = PW/T=6.64ms/20ms=0.332=33,2%
100k->7.93ms
110k->10ms D = PW/T=10ms/20ms=0.5=50%

We have halfwave, so maximum Duty cycle is 50%, everything looks fine, the dimmer works fine.
Am I correct?
6
...From my limited poking around, I think they are going to be in deep trouble if Ding ever decides to leave.

Three cheers for Ding!
7
My solution when I needed to do this was to conduct the test in an empty lot on top of a hill.  The lot I used was not quite empty; I could measure the reflections from trees and lamp posts in the distance but they were small enough to ignore for my purposes.
8
 :-DD   TK perhaps it's time you ask the audience or phone a friend for this one?

Seriously,  I believe that Janekivi's post down the page might shed light on this.  Options on many of the Siglent devices are easily liberated through root access.  I'm guessing that the SVA1015X is no exception.  :) 
9
In a nutshell, this idea would be building a YubiKey clone of my own, since I have trouble buying YubiKey legitimately in China (due to US export controls.) The centerpiece of the token would be an ATECC508A chip.

Questions:
1. How good is it? As in how secure is it?
2. Is there any standard USB protocol for security tokens like this? Hopefully this standard protocol will allow me to log into my computer using this.
3. Do I need a PKI to use it, or can I just rely on decentralized crypto like GPG?
4. Recommendations of the fingerprint scanner? Or do I even need one?
5. Is it a good idea to put the PCB assembly in a dremmeled USB stick case?
6. Is there any good solution for storing and sending sensitive data secured using such tokens? (If GPG can work, this is a no-brainer as it supports both file encryption and S/MIME with PGP. Otherwise...)
10
Test Equipment / Re: Siglent SDS1104X-E vs. Rigol DS1054Z Advice?
« Last post by KungFuJosh on Today at 07:32:27 am »
Uh oh. I might have found something useful in the SDS1104X-E's favor. It looks like that can handle 400VDC input according to the datasheet, and the Rigol only 300VDC. Am I reading that right?

Assuming I'm reading that right, that might be useful. Or should I be more interested in a differential scope for that voltage level? A few spots on my amps go above 300, usually not above 350 for most circuits I build. I dunno if I'd ever connect there, but, ya know...or never know.
Pages: [1] 2 3 4 5 6 ... 10 Next