Author Topic: Hot Air Pencils - what they are and what they can do for you. By Fraser  (Read 5009 times)

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Offline Fraser

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If in doubt, always check the manufacturers webs site ;)

HAP60 is 24V 60W
HAP80 is 32V 80W

The station needs to match the requirements of the HAP.

http://www.xytronic-usa.com/shop/category.aspx?catid=9

Fraser
 
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Offline Fraser

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Regarding the nozzle number, sorry I have not used that HAP since the review as I have the better OKI and PACE handpieces that I use in the lab. The HAP will be stored in a box somewhere in my spare room so I cannot put my hands in it quickly.

Regarding using a desoldering iron as a HAP, the issue is likely to be with the performance of the heart assembly in the 'blow' mode. The hot air nozzle is an indirect air flow type that diverts the air around the nozzle piece to increase the heat energy applied to the air stream. A desoldering tip is direct air flow up the centre. I suspect the HAP nozzle is a larger diameter requiring a larger bore in the handpiece heater. The PACE desoldering and hot air pencils look very similar but the hot air pencil uses a different heater assembly with a larger bore and a thermal diffuser insert that does something clever with the air as it flows through it. No harm in doing some tests on a scrap PCB though.

Fraser
 
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Offline Fraser

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You could consider getting a HAP80 and running it on 24V from your station. You need to check current draw to ensure it is within your stations capabilities but you can work out the various specs of 80W32V and 60W24V

Rough calculations for comparison......

For HAP80 ......

Current = P/V = 2.5A
R = V/I = 12.8 Ohms

For HAP60 .......

Current = P/V = 2.5A
R = V/I = 9.6 Ohms

What happens when a HAP80 is powered from 24V ? ..........

I = V/R = 1.875A
P = IV = 1.875 x 24 = 45W

So you will have an approx 45W hot air pencil if you use a HAP80 in place of a HAP60. You may need to change the connector if the HAP80 and HAP60 differ in this respect.

Is 45W enough ? I cannot be certain, I will see what the PACE is rated at and post here.

Fraser
 
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Offline Fraser

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Looks like a 'no-go' on using the HAP80 at 45W

The PACE Thermojet uses a 75W heater and operates at a nominal 480C

The cooling effect of the air flow passing through the nozzle assembly requires a reasonably powerful heating element. I suspect a HAP80 running at 45W will not have the required heating power for a decent hot air pencil, especially if ROHS lead free solder is involved. That said, I have heard of the Weller desoldering irons being used as hot air pencils. How well they perform, I do not know.

Fraser
 
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Offline Noidzoid

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Thank you very much for all the information and going to the trouble of posting it all Fraser, it is appreciated.

I think considering all that has been highlighted it would be best for me to either keep looking for a decent used HAP60 or get a different hot air source all together.

Thanks again for your time Fraser.
 

Offline Fraser

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I will be honest.... the HAP60 or 80 would not be my first choice in hot air pencils. I recommend a used unit such as the OKI or PACE products. I recently picked up a complete used Pace internal pump base station plus Thermojet and Sod-X-Tractor handpieces for £100. In great condition and worth every penny in my opinion. Works brilliantly and my other PACE handpiece also fit it. I am fortunate to already have a lot of PACE kit.

You do have the option to purchase one of the relatively cheap Chinese hot air stations and use the smallest nozzle size. I have used many such Chinese hot air stations and all worked fine for me. They are much more common, and versatile, than hot air pencils.

Fraser

« Last Edit: July 14, 2018, 06:28:16 am by Fraser »
 
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