Author Topic: Teardown: Cheerson CX10 Mini Quadcopter  (Read 19005 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline 8086

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 1086
  • Country: gb
    • Circuitology - Electronics Assembly
Teardown: Cheerson CX10 Mini Quadcopter
« on: November 07, 2014, 04:35:27 am »
Bought one of these on a whim last Thursday, thought a teardown was in order! What do you get in a £12 mini quadcopter?


http://www.banggood.com/Cheerson-CX10-CX10-Mini-24G-4CH-6-Axis-LED-RC-Quadcopter-RTF-p-926614.html

It's definitely a neat little toy, and yes it does fly, very well in fact. So of course I was keen to see what's under the hood.

With the rotors removed:


The underside:


You can see the 100mAh battery, and the four retaining screws.

They look like small machine screws, rather than self tappers.


Well, what do we have here? No chip-on-board epoxy blobs, a few QFN ICs.


Top middle, the IC is labelled "XN297", which looks to be the 2.4GHz receiver - a "wireless mouse solution" by a company called Panchip: http://www.panchip.com/en/products_show.aspx?cid=70&id=351

I assume the controller contains another XN297, I didn't take it apart.

To the left is an Invensense MPU-6050 - an integrated 3 axis gyro and 3 axis accelerometer. Whether it's real or fake is anyone's guess, they seem too expensive to put the real thing in a £12 product. http://www.invensense.com/mems/gyro/mpu6050.html

To the right is a STmicro STM32 F050K4 MCU.

There is also an LED in each corner - blue at the front, orange at the back.

Let's flip the board over:


To the top is the PCB antenna, coming through from the other side.

Underneath that is a 16MHz crystal.

The 5-pin IC just below the date marking is marked "F04A", which could possibly be a 4.5V threshold detection IC - a really basic battery charge cut off, perhaps. Now I know this is in here, I won't be trusting it while charging anymore. There is no charging IC.

Interestingly, pin 4 of the aforementioned IC isn't actually soldered to the PCB - it's left hanging, over some silkscreen. Not sure what that's about.

Each of the ICs on the four 'arms' is marked "004H", I assume just a simple transistor or something to drive each motor.

The LiPo battery is marked "751517", 3.7V, 100mAh.

Here's a gallery with a few more pictures: http://imgur.com/a/jBN4E
« Last Edit: November 07, 2014, 04:57:47 am by 8086 »
 

Offline SeanB

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 15052
  • Country: za
Re: Teardown: Cheerson CX10 Mini Quadcopter
« Reply #1 on: November 07, 2014, 05:50:26 am »
Is that battery swelling so much already? Seems to be close to the point of doing an in air flame out session.
 

Offline SodaAnt

  • Contributor
  • Posts: 9
  • Country: 00
  • Hobbyist EE
Re: Teardown: Cheerson CX10 Mini Quadcopter
« Reply #2 on: November 07, 2014, 07:58:18 am »
Is that battery swelling so much already? Seems to be close to the point of doing an in air flame out session.

That's what I thought too, but it looks like it just might be at an odd angle, and not actually puffed at all.
 

Offline 8086

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 1086
  • Country: gb
    • Circuitology - Electronics Assembly
Re: Teardown: Cheerson CX10 Mini Quadcopter
« Reply #3 on: November 07, 2014, 09:08:22 am »
The battery is about twice as thick as a normal LiPo, and it seems to be intentional. It doesn't seem to have swelled to me.
 

Offline arekm

  • Supporter
  • ****
  • Posts: 149
  • Country: pl
Re: Teardown: Cheerson CX10 Mini Quadcopter
« Reply #4 on: January 08, 2015, 12:25:48 am »
There is a giveaway for these (2 units) currently: http://forum.banggood.com/forum-topic-35494.html
PLD/Linux Team. Electronics as a hobby.
http://readme.maven.pl/
 

Offline janekm

  • Supporter
  • ****
  • Posts: 516
  • Country: gb
Re: Teardown: Cheerson CX10 Mini Quadcopter
« Reply #5 on: January 08, 2015, 08:00:52 pm »
Thanks a lot for posting that, I was curious about what's inside these!

[snip]


To the top is the PCB antenna, coming through from the other side.

Underneath that is a 16MHz crystal.

The 5-pin IC just below the date marking is marked "F04A", which could possibly be a 4.5V threshold detection IC - a really basic battery charge cut off, perhaps. Now I know this is in here, I won't be trusting it while charging anymore. There is no charging IC.

Interestingly, pin 4 of the aforementioned IC isn't actually soldered to the PCB - it's left hanging, over some silkscreen. Not sure what that's about.

Each of the ICs on the four 'arms' is marked "004H", I assume just a simple transistor or something to drive each motor.

The LiPo battery is marked "751517", 3.7V, 100mAh.

Here's a gallery with a few more pictures: http://imgur.com/a/jBN4E

That SOT23-5 part is an LDO, it's needed as the parts on the other side can't operate at above 3.3V. It's the standard pinout of a so23-5 LDO with a bypass pin. The bypass pin can be connected to a small, low-leakage capacitor to ground to improve noise performance. Putting the pin on top of the ground plane with solder mask + silkscreen in-between is a cute idea for a 0-cost capacitor ;)

The charger IC is bound to be inside the charging cable (it makes sense not to carry that around while flying).

The MPU6050 might be a recycled part... I don't think there's actual fakes yet as the manufacturing technology for MEMS gyros is pretty challenging, and it wouldn't fly so great without gyros ;)

You can always learn something interesting from taking apart Chinese toys...
 


Share me

Digg  Facebook  SlashDot  Delicious  Technorati  Twitter  Google  Yahoo
Smf