Author Topic: Split the Signal from an Antenna?  (Read 1056 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Lord of nothing

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 795
  • Country: at
Split the Signal from an Antenna?
« on: February 17, 2018, 10:09:50 pm »
Hi
I have an good working VHF Antenna who I could receive several different thing I want decode 24/7 include TV and Digital Radio.  ;D
I could not found any Splitter that look like the could do the job.  :-// I know there are some for TV thing but I dont trust them. So can someone recommend an Product who get sell in Europe or directly from China?
I have different Filter I will use.
THX  :clap:
Made in Japan, destroyed in Sulz im Wienerwald.
 

Offline Gribo

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 330
  • Country: ca
Re: Split the Signal from an Antenna?
« Reply #1 on: February 22, 2018, 02:04:23 am »
Why don't you trust these splitters? A 75 Ohm power splitter is few $ (EU) with good enough performance at VHF. A fancier 75 Ohm splitter might even go to 2GHz with ~6db insertion loss.
 

Offline Lord of nothing

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 795
  • Country: at
Re: Split the Signal from an Antenna?
« Reply #2 on: February 22, 2018, 04:11:13 am »
The have no SMA Plug on and the loss must be insane.  :-//
Made in Japan, destroyed in Sulz im Wienerwald.
 

Offline GrahamC

  • Contributor
  • Posts: 11
  • Country: ca
Re: Split the Signal from an Antenna?
« Reply #3 on: February 22, 2018, 05:00:52 am »
If you were to actually be able to measure the impedance of your receiver(s) and the inexpensive TV/Satellite 75 ohm splitters, you would likely find that their impedance is only ever 50 ohms some of the time. Even the impedance of your antenna will change depending upon what frequency it is being used for.

The whole of your antenna, feed line, connectors, receivers and splitters is a complex system and near impossible to maintain one impedance from end to the other on all frequencies all of the time.

The inexpensive TV/Satellite splitters will work quite well for what you want to do (but don't transmit through them).

You can get F connector to SMA adapters quite inexpensively, this is just one example:  https://www.ebay.com/itm/192338526628

incidentally, 50 ohms systems have a slight advantage in the transmission of power, 75 ohm a slight advantage in voltage. Use google and search for something like "why 50 ohms" or "50 ohm vs 75".  And, there are many more other impedance's for cable besides 50 and 75.

cheers, Graham


 
The following users thanked this post: AF6LJ

Offline hagster

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 275
Re: Split the Signal from an Antenna?
« Reply #4 on: February 22, 2018, 05:53:50 am »
If you stick an LNA in front you can easily build a resistive splitter that will work well for VHF and the extra loss wont matter much.
 
The following users thanked this post: AF6LJ

Offline vk6zgo

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 4290
  • Country: au
Re: Split the Signal from an Antenna?
« Reply #5 on: February 22, 2018, 12:06:41 pm »
The have no SMA Plug on and the loss must be insane.  :-//

Most such devices use "F" connectors which have quite reasonable specs.
If you mean loss in the device, well, of course, that is the price you pay for wide bandwidth devices.
It won't be that high, though, as otherwise they would be useless for their intended purposes.

Not everybody lives in "line of sight" of their main metropolitan TV sites as I do, so they must be useable
at considerably lower signal levels to be any good elsewhere.

( I have two 2 way splitters  feeding three TV outlets----one direct from the first splitter, & the other two from the  second splitter which itself is fed from the second output of the first one.)
 

Offline AF6LJ

  • Supporter
  • ****
  • Posts: 2887
  • Country: us
Re: Split the Signal from an Antenna?
« Reply #6 on: February 23, 2018, 04:19:51 am »
The TV splitters should work fine, just add enough amplification ahead of the splitter to make up for the loss of the splitter.
Sue AF6LJ
Test Equipment Addict, And Proud Of It.
 

Offline Lord of nothing

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 795
  • Country: at
Made in Japan, destroyed in Sulz im Wienerwald.
 

Online chrisl

  • Contributor
  • Posts: 49
  • Country: us
Re: Split the Signal from an Antenna?
« Reply #8 on: February 23, 2018, 08:20:40 pm »
It is normal to see ~12dB of loss when you split the signal in 8 ways.
If you want low loss, get a 2 way splitter... The loss should be around 4dB.
 

Offline TheUnnamedNewbie

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 650
  • Country: be
  • Sending EM through plastic.
Re: Split the Signal from an Antenna?
« Reply #9 on: February 23, 2018, 08:36:39 pm »
that: https://www.conrad.at/de/sat-verteiler-schwaiger-vtf8848-8-fach-5-2400-mhz-759672.html
The loss is huge...  :scared:

That is actually quite good. Think of it this way: if I put 1 W of power into the device, the sum of the powers from the outputs can be at most 1 W, otherwise the device would defy the laws of physics (as it would be a over-unity device).
In other words, if I split it in 2, I would be able to get at most 0.5 W from each output - or -3dB. Split that in 2 again, to give 4 outputs, and I'm at -6 dB. 2 again to give 8 outputs, and we are at -9 dB. And that is the ideal case, with no losses inside the device - in other words, an ideal splitter could never give you better than - 9 dB in this case.

However, most wideband splitters use resistive techniques to provide matching of the outputs, resulting in another few db lost. So that is a perfectly normal amount of loss for a 8 way splitter.

If you want better you need more complicated tricks like Wilkinson dividers - but these are far less broadband, and if you want them somewhat broadband you need multiple-stage dividers which become complex (and thus expensive) real fast.
The best part about magic is when it stops being magic and becomes science instead
 

Offline AF6LJ

  • Supporter
  • ****
  • Posts: 2887
  • Country: us
Re: Split the Signal from an Antenna?
« Reply #10 on: February 23, 2018, 11:57:49 pm »
that: https://www.conrad.at/de/sat-verteiler-schwaiger-vtf8848-8-fach-5-2400-mhz-759672.html
The loss is huge...  :scared:
Well yes it is, which is why I said drive it with a pre amp to compensate for the loss. Even commercial multi-couplers use preamplification to drive these splitters.
Just use a good quality LNA and you are in business.
Sue AF6LJ
Test Equipment Addict, And Proud Of It.
 

Online james_s

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 6622
  • Country: us
Re: Split the Signal from an Antenna?
« Reply #11 on: March 09, 2018, 01:41:41 pm »
Put the amp as close to the antenna as possible too, that way you're not amplifying noise picked up along the way. You'll always have a loss whenever you split a signal, even if nothing is connected to some of the ports on the splitter. This is why you should never use a larger splitter than you need.
 

Offline AF6LJ

  • Supporter
  • ****
  • Posts: 2887
  • Country: us
Re: Split the Signal from an Antenna?
« Reply #12 on: March 10, 2018, 12:23:23 am »
Put the amp as close to the antenna as possible too, that way you're not amplifying noise picked up along the way. You'll always have a loss whenever you split a signal, even if nothing is connected to some of the ports on the splitter. This is why you should never use a larger splitter than you need.

agreed and terminate any unused ports.
Sue AF6LJ
Test Equipment Addict, And Proud Of It.
 

Offline Lord of nothing

  • Frequent Contributor
  • **
  • Posts: 795
  • Country: at
Re: Split the Signal from an Antenna?
« Reply #13 on: March 10, 2018, 12:53:07 am »
The major problem is the raspberry pi generate a lot of noise.  :--
Made in Japan, destroyed in Sulz im Wienerwald.
 


Share me

Digg  Facebook  SlashDot  Delicious  Technorati  Twitter  Google  Yahoo
Smf