Author Topic: $20 LCR ESR Transistor checker project  (Read 778023 times)

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Offline madires

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Re: $20 LCR ESR Transistor checker project
« Reply #3250 on: February 13, 2017, 09:44:57 PM »
Hi Mauro!

Regarding the servo check function, AFAIK the center position should be for a pulse width of 1.5ms, the lowest and highest value varies for each servo.
The cheap servo checker available on ebay has 3 functions:
- center
  It provide a signal with 1.5ms pulse width every 20ms. This is very useful setting up the RC models
- manual
  Rotating the knob it provide the signal depending by the position of the knob from 1 to 2 ms
- Auto
  It sweep between the min and max pulse width continuously from 1 to 2 ms

At the moment the servo check starts with a 1.5ms pulse and you can turn the rotary encoder to change the pulse length down to 0.5ms or up to 2.5ms. A short button press resets the pulse back to 1.5ms. Of course the pulse length is displayed.
 

Offline mauroh

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Re: $20 LCR ESR Transistor checker project
« Reply #3251 on: February 14, 2017, 12:33:39 AM »
That should be more than enough and actually better than the cheap servo tester, since you'll know the position of the motor for each value of the puse width  :-+
Anyway a better servo tester should support analog and digital servo:

50Hz   analog servo                   signal period 20ms
125Hz digital for steering gear   signal period 8ms
250Hz digital servo                    signal period 4ms

On some hobby model forums I read someone complaining on the min/max pulse width that should be within 800-2200uS to avoid damage on some servo, but do not quote me on this.

I know the purpose of this ESR/LCR/transistor tester..... is changing a bit, but since we are adding something useful let's do it at best!!! :)

Also the Auto sweep is important because you can test the speed responce of the servo, changing the sweep time.

Mauro
« Last Edit: February 14, 2017, 11:00:05 AM by mauroh »
 

Online imidis

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Re: Compiler help needed
« Reply #3252 on: February 14, 2017, 01:20:15 AM »

See, I am a fast learner! :P

Cheers for your assistance, take it easy, I'll come back in about 10 hours or so. Sleep time now... zzzzzz
Thank you for making me laugh!   :)

As someone else said, switching tool chains works for that. I used on linux the one that comes with the arduino ide, on windows too. Works much better size wise. Then the fun begins tweaking and playing!

Offline avrishuvorlaz

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Re: Compiler help needed
« Reply #3253 on: February 14, 2017, 09:54:16 AM »
I tried searching this thread, it's a NIGHTMARE to find what I need!

I should remind everybody, if you are responding to a post immediately before (or even a ¬°few before) yours, there is no need to 'Quote' their entire post. This makes the forum more difficult to read. Especially, when a post three pages long and full of pictures, gets quoted over and over again. Please use 'Reply' instead. Also if you're responding to just one particular sentence, you can trim out everything else.

(I realize that one of the problems is that the reply button is only at the top and bottom of the page. On other forums I've seen it conveniently placed at the end of each post. I think I might mention it to the mods.)

Yes, it was around 6-7am and I was about to go to bed, so pedantically picking apart quote tags wasn't at the forefront of my mind, and thanks for reminding me, it is annoying when people do this - I hold my hands up!
 

Offline avrishuvorlaz

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Re: Compiler help needed
« Reply #3254 on: February 14, 2017, 10:01:39 AM »
So it seems I was on the right track?

I did a test "make" from the folder named above, and also saw the "107%" error for the main .hex

I think you are on the right track.

Where did you get your toolchain? What is your compiler version?

The oversized hex files has been brought up a few times. It's always caused by one of two problems. Either the wrong format (Intel) is being specified to AVRDUDE. I don't think that's your case since you're using a makefile. Yes, the other cause is using the wrong version of compiler (AVR-GCC). The solution that people suggested was either using an older version, or using the one included with the Arduino IDE (free one, not AVR Studio). I have been using the latest build (6.2.0) without problem. Since you are familiar with Linux, try cloning the 'gcc-avr' repository.

Here's a link with details.

Okay, I am using Windows 10 right now, and have added Arduino IDE's bin to my path, and "avr-gcc" works fine from any location, but where is "make" - is that part of Arduino IDE, or will I have to install WinAVR too? (I know WinAVR adds all binaries to my PATH environment, as it should.)

I never quite know what is encompassed under "toolchain" when people refer to it; does "toolchain" include "make" executables too, because if Arduino IDE contains a "toolchain" (well I know it contains "avr-gcc.exe" etc) then it doesn't appear to include "make.exe".

~{EDITED}~

Okay, I managed to find a suitable "make.exe" copy @ ftp://ftp.equation.com/make/32/make.exe - I put it on my Desktop for the moment, to test it, and added that location to my PATH - it now builds fine, at only 93.2% program space :)

Thank you :)
« Last Edit: February 14, 2017, 10:11:56 AM by avrishuvorlaz »
 

Online imidis

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Re: Compiler help needed
« Reply #3255 on: February 14, 2017, 10:20:02 AM »

Okay, I managed to find a suitable "make.exe" copy @ ftp://ftp.equation.com/make/32/make.exe - I put it on my Desktop for the moment, to test it, and added that location to my PATH - it now builds fine, at only 93.2% program space :)


I have installed WinAVR on my windows system then I just reference the arduino avr-gcc in the path within the makefile, alternatively you can add it in environment variables on the windows system.

 
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Offline avrishuvorlaz

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Re: $20 LCR ESR Transistor checker project
« Reply #3256 on: February 14, 2017, 12:32:23 PM »
Mr hapless, master of LCR firmwares, [...]

Heh, that's very kind of you, but there are people around here who are much more deserving of the title...

[...] I used your "TransistorTester (as above, but no flipping).zip" on my device which was originally on the "Mtester" firmware, and it works a treat... but one thing I have noticed is this - the characters seem to be shifted too far to the right by 0.5-1 characters - do you know how I would resolve this? The typeface is nice and bold - maybe a little TOO bold, at the expense of the chars flowing off the right hand side of the LCD.

The fonts are monospaced, so it's the width of the characters that matters, otherwise bold ones can be the same width as the thin ones. It's more of a matter of taste. As madires pointed out, the problem is with the offset that was deliberately used so that the exact same issue would be fixed for devices that have their screens rotated 180 degrees. I'm attaching a build that should fix this for you, but it doesn't use the exact same Makefile, so please let me know if I accidentally broke something.

Note: I made some (very few) slight changes to the output of the code. They are not even worth mentioning, but don't be surprised if you see that "Version1.13" now has a space in it or that "4 * ->|-" shows as "4 x ->|-".

[...]
i have brushed it with IPA, top&bottom side of it, and have some progress after that.   :-+
[...]
maybe my tester is still not work normally?

I'm very happy that it's finally starting to work, but you need to need to give it at least one more go with water (try to dry it as quickly as possible!) and then alcohol. Clean very thoroughly. You'll probably also want to clean between the pins of the MCU, too (just in case). Just make sure it's completely dry before powering up the board, and, of course, be gentle enough not to damage anything while you're at it.

You've fixed the "falling off the right-hand edge" issue, thank you!

(Attached as ZIP): As a nitpicker, I have edited some of the rather vague parts of the menu, in "Transistortester.h" - I didn't like the menu being called "Selection:" - "Main Menu:" looks far better in my opinion. I have also called the function generator "Square Wave Func Gen" as it describes it more precisely, and I have reduced the typeface to the lowest size - it really didn't need to be all that big, unless your eyesight is poor. I am just playing around with my new toy. :) - please have a play with it.

I've now permanently soldered a header on my tester for my USBASP, whereas before I was just holding it onto the pads firmly with one hand, whilst typing with the other. Because the solder side of the header pins (I soldered the header so it stick out of the BACK side of the PCB, obviously) fouls the light diffuser at the back of the LCD, I have raise the LCD module up around 3-4mm with some self-adhesive foam pads.

Sorry to the pedants, I can't work out who is which quote, so I just clicked "quote" - it's not my job to fix bugs or missing features in forum functionality, you'll have to forgive and put up with quotes of quotes of quotes until someone rectifies this.
« Last Edit: February 14, 2017, 01:18:51 PM by avrishuvorlaz »
 

Online timelessbeing

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Re: $20 LCR ESR Transistor checker project
« Reply #3257 on: February 14, 2017, 06:22:05 PM »
@vrishuvorlaz I wasn't picking on you. It's just something I noticed in general, and you provided a good opportunity to bring it up, since you were complaining about being able to find information. Quoting something that was said on a previous page, as you just did, is justified because that's exactly what it's for. But don't defend laziness or blame somebody else, because it's inexcusable. There's no bug. If you are replying to the most recent post, then the reply button is right under your nose. No scrolling required. I'm not pedantic, I simply think we should be courteous to all the other users of the forum who might need help, like you. I don't think think this needs further explaining.

EDIT: Do you see the new 'Reply' button there next to 'Quote'. Dave liked the idea and added it.  :-+
« Last Edit: February 14, 2017, 06:56:29 PM by timelessbeing »
 
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Online bitseeker

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Re: $20 LCR ESR Transistor checker project
« Reply #3258 on: February 15, 2017, 06:33:56 AM »
+1 for the newly added and handy reply link. :-+
Have too much test equipment, yet want more? You're not alone. Join us at EEVblog's Test Equipment Anonymous.
 

Offline avrishuvorlaz

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Re: $20 LCR ESR Transistor checker project
« Reply #3259 on: February 15, 2017, 02:21:33 PM »
@vrishuvorlaz I wasn't picking on you. It's just something I noticed in general, and you provided a good opportunity to bring it up, since you were complaining about being able to find information. Quoting something that was said on a previous page, as you just did, is justified because that's exactly what it's for. But don't defend laziness or blame somebody else, because it's inexcusable. There's no bug. If you are replying to the most recent post, then the reply button is right under your nose. No scrolling required. I'm not pedantic, I simply think we should be courteous to all the other users of the forum who might need help, like you. I don't think think this needs further explaining.

EDIT: Do you see the new 'Reply' button there next to 'Quote'. Dave liked the idea and added it.  :-+

 Thank you, I understand - I couldn't work out which was which quote ID - I *REALLY* dislike messy quotes. Finally Dave has added a per-message "reply" button, that's nice yes, what took so long? It's a basic forum feature, shouldn't be seen as some miraculous "upgrade".  :-//

Let's say Dave were reviewing V 0.1 of a PSU board, and it didn't have enough spacing between live and neutral and VERY thin traces, and then a week later he was sent a fixed version with those issues resolved, I wouldn't expect him to congratulate the designer - it was inevitable that this should be fixed; same applies to the "reply" button. But anyway, thanks Dave - finally - I shall thank you - certainly better late than not at all. :)
« Last Edit: February 15, 2017, 02:28:05 PM by avrishuvorlaz »
 

Offline avrishuvorlaz

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Re: $20 LCR ESR Transistor checker project
« Reply #3260 on: February 15, 2017, 02:59:08 PM »
Thankfully the maker of my LCR-T4 tester had the good sense to mark the ISP port for programming - the legend is UNDER the LCD, you just need to de-solder the LCD backlight LED and lift... and you see it. I've also taken a photo of the LCD ribbon cable on my model, for what it matters - it may help someone:







Out of interest, how does one find out what type of LCD/driver chip/interface is used, per tester variant, please? Thanks.

« Last Edit: February 15, 2017, 03:58:01 PM by avrishuvorlaz »
 

Offline madires

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Re: $20 LCR ESR Transistor checker project
« Reply #3261 on: February 16, 2017, 05:01:34 AM »
Anyway a better servo tester should support analog and digital servo:

50Hz   analog servo                   signal period 20ms
125Hz digital for steering gear   signal period 8ms
250Hz digital servo                    signal period 4ms

Ok, I've added those frequencies and also 333Hz for some high speed servos. The UI will be similar to the deluxe PWM generator.

Also the Auto sweep is important because you can test the speed responce of the servo, changing the sweep time.

Let's see if I'm able to find a way to add that too...
 

Offline mauroh

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Re: $20 LCR ESR Transistor checker project
« Reply #3262 on: February 16, 2017, 05:25:18 AM »
This is great!!!  :-+
I have few spare servo and ESC from my RC helicopters/multicopters secondary hobby ready to test the new firmware  :)
Mauro
 

Offline GBowes

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Re: $20 LCR ESR Transistor checker project
« Reply #3263 on: February 16, 2017, 06:40:53 AM »
Thankfully the maker of my LCR-T4 tester had the good sense to mark the ISP port for programming - the legend is UNDER the LCD, you just need to de-solder the LCD backlight LED and lift... and you see it..
What is even nicer is that he made it so a standard socket can be attached to the back. Note that the labels you see on the top side are actually mirror image of a standard 6 pin ISP connector

Graham
 
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Offline MickM

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Re: $20 LCR ESR Transistor checker project
« Reply #3264 on: February 16, 2017, 09:25:42 AM »
Hi;
  I have a Sarduino ( http://spaceagerobotics.com/blog/projects/sarduino/ ),
and a Sanguino (http://sanguino.wikidot.com/) in my junk drawer.
( abandoned for 2560 Mega )

Basically just breakout boards for an ATmega644/1284.
I have built several testers based on the Atmega328, and want to expand it.
I would like to incorporate the various adapters, ( opto, options etc)
Is there up to date docs on this?
What else should I add?

Has anyone done this?, any hints?

Oh I also ordered one of these:
https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=9SIABV75251610&nm_mc=TEMC-RMA-Approvel&cm_mmc=TEMC-RMA-Approvel-_-Content-_-text-_-

It's a "IC Transistor Tester Detect Meter Maintenance Digital led Tester MOS PNP NPN "
It tests 74xx and 4xxx chips.

I watched this video, and went searching.


MickM

Thanks
 

Offline avrishuvorlaz

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Re: $20 LCR ESR Transistor checker project
« Reply #3265 on: February 16, 2017, 02:34:33 PM »
Thankfully the maker of my LCR-T4 tester had the good sense to mark the ISP port for programming - the legend is UNDER the LCD, you just need to de-solder the LCD backlight LED and lift... and you see it..
What is even nicer is that he made it so a standard socket can be attached to the back. Note that the labels you see on the top side are actually mirror image of a standard 6 pin ISP connector

Graham

Yeah, it's very nice that it's a standard ISP layout, but then it would be no big deal if it wasn't.
 

Offline madires

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Re: $20 LCR ESR Transistor checker project
« Reply #3266 on: February 16, 2017, 09:53:34 PM »
Basically just breakout boards for an ATmega644/1284.
I have built several testers based on the Atmega328, and want to expand it.
I would like to incorporate the various adapters, ( opto, options etc)
Is there up to date docs on this?

Karl-Heinz' documentation would be the best place to start. It includes two circuits for the 644/1284 and most options. I'll attach the schematic of my 644/1284 dev board. The nice thing besides the additional I/O pins is that we can use hardware I2C and SPI. The pin assignment of the 328 based tester doesn't permit that. The basic pin assignment for the 644/1284 is:

Port A: ADC
- PA0: Probe #1
- PA1: Probe #2
- PA2: Probe #3
- PA3: V external (Zener)
- PA4: 2.5V reference
- PA5: V battery
- PA6: unused
- PA7: Probe for fixed 100nF cap for auto-adjustment

Port D: resistors and serial
- PD0: RXD0
- PD1: TXD0
- PD2: TP1 R_Low
- PD3: TP1 R_High
- PD4: TP2 R_Low
- PD5: TP2 R_High
- PD6: TP3 R_Low
- PD7: TP3 R_High

Port C: controls and I2C
- PC0: I2C (SCL)
- PC1: I2C (SDA)
- PC2:
  + frequency counter: 16:1 divider
  + parallel cap for SamplingADC
- PC3:
  + frequency counter: Input Select P0
  + rotary encoder A
- PC4:
  + frequency counter: Input Select P1
  + rotary encoder B
- PC5: Rh for fixed 100nF cap (auto-adjustment)
- PC6: power control
- PC7: push button

Port B: HD44780 display
- PB0: frequency counter: f in
- PB1: unused
- PB2: RS
- PB3: E
- PB4: D4
- PB5: D5
- PB6: D6
- PB7: D7

Port B: SPI display
- PB0: frequency counter: f in
- PB1: unused
- PB2: /Reset
- PB3: Data/Command
- PB4: /CS
- PB5: MOSI
- PB6: MISO
- PB7: SCK

There are also ideas to extend the B port with one or two 74HC595 for driving displays and other things.

It's a "IC Transistor Tester Detect Meter Maintenance Digital led Tester MOS PNP NPN "
It tests 74xx and 4xxx chips.

That's a completely different tester. Some do also a few OPamps and other ICs.
« Last Edit: February 16, 2017, 10:08:06 PM by madires »
 

Offline madires

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Re: $20 LCR ESR Transistor checker project
« Reply #3267 on: February 18, 2017, 03:46:49 AM »
This is great!!!  :-+
I have few spare servo and ESC from my RC helicopters/multicopters secondary hobby ready to test the new firmware  :)

By using a second timer plus ISR I was able to add the sweep function. When in sweep mode the tester displays the sweep time (for sweeping the PWM pulse from 1ms to 2ms).
 
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Offline MickM

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Re: $20 LCR ESR Transistor checker project
« Reply #3268 on: February 18, 2017, 10:26:47 AM »
Hi;
 Thank you Madires.
Yes I have the docs, but there seems to be lots of scattered tidbits, and adapters out there.
I will be using Eagle which has size limits.
So daughter boards it is, the port info is great.

The other tester is indeed  a different beast.
I have never seen a portable one, ( so cheap too ), and just thought that I would share it.
 

Online timelessbeing

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Re: $20 LCR ESR Transistor checker project
« Reply #3269 on: February 18, 2017, 03:55:00 PM »
Yep, the firmware measures the voltage at PC4 and if it's around 2.5V it assumes it's the external voltage reference. The pull-up resistor makes sure that PC4 is outside the expected voltage range, and 100k or 220k would be fine also. The m-firmware behaves the same way, but HW_REF25 (config.h) controls if the code get's included or not.
What is the procedure if not using the voltage reference, but relay extension is used? No pull-up resistor?
 

Offline madires

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Re: $20 LCR ESR Transistor checker project
« Reply #3270 on: February 18, 2017, 08:07:43 PM »
What is the procedure if not using the voltage reference, but relay extension is used? No pull-up resistor?

A pull-up resistor at PC4 (ATmega 328) and the BJT's base resistor should be replaced by a higher value. The MCU uses PC4 as input for measuring the reference voltage and as open collector output for switching the relay. 
 

Offline mateusps

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Re: $20 LCR ESR Transistor checker project
« Reply #3271 on: February 19, 2017, 12:43:19 AM »
I'm having some trouble getting my AY-AT tester to work, it keeps displaying the message "Probing" "Battery? 1: 4996v" (using the Trendy 1.25 firmware) - The original chinese firmware was similar, but stuck in the 'short probes!' message. I've tried with another atmega328 but the result is the same :(
Any clues on how to fix this?

Thanks!
 

Offline madires

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Re: $20 LCR ESR Transistor checker project
« Reply #3272 on: February 19, 2017, 01:36:55 AM »
I'm having some trouble getting my AY-AT tester to work, it keeps displaying the message "Probing" "Battery? 1: 4996v" (using the Trendy 1.25 firmware) - The original chinese firmware was similar, but stuck in the 'short probes!' message. I've tried with another atmega328 but the result is the same :(
Any clues on how to fix this?

The tester tries to tell you that it measures 5V on probe pin #1 while it expects 0V. Possibly caused by some short.
 

Offline mateusps

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Re: $20 LCR ESR Transistor checker project
« Reply #3273 on: February 19, 2017, 05:50:34 AM »
Hi madires,
I tried to power on the tester with the atmega pins relative to the test points 1/2/3 lifted. It still displaying "battery?" but now is around 1800mV
Even with this pins lifted and some components removed, 5v still preset on the TP 1.

 

Online Strada916

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Re: $20 LCR ESR Transistor checker project
« Reply #3274 on: February 19, 2017, 05:54:57 AM »
You might want to take a photo showing the soldering

Sent from my D6503 using Tapatalk

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