Author Topic: Multimeter and soldering iron advice  (Read 3889 times)

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Offline Mr. Scram

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Re: Multimeter and soldering iron advice
« Reply #50 on: January 12, 2018, 01:19:30 am »
You might want to look at the Quick 957DW.  I just got one, much better than the Yihua 858D that I have.  I paid $82 USD from Newark and it came with 3 nozzles.  The hose is a bit stiff but still a nice bit of kit.

They won't knowing their constituents might want to use them for target practice. :box:
I'm not aware of how the Quick 957DW is rated. I know the Quick 861DW is loved by many, but am careful to translate that to other models of the same brand.
 

Offline Fungus

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Re: Multimeter and soldering iron advice
« Reply #51 on: January 12, 2018, 01:23:55 am »
You might want to look at the Quick 957DW.  I just got one, much better than the Yihua 858D that I have.  I paid $82 USD from Newark and it came with 3 nozzles.  The hose is a bit stiff but still a nice bit of kit.

They won't knowing their constituents might want to use them for target practice. :box:
I'm not aware of how the Quick 957DW is rated. I know the Quick 861DW is loved by many, but am careful to translate that to other models of the same brand.

It all comes down to how many hours a day you're going to be using it. Those Yihua stations are cheap and quite well regarded for light-to-moderate use.
 

Offline Mr. Scram

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Re: Multimeter and soldering iron advice
« Reply #52 on: January 12, 2018, 01:31:36 am »
It all comes down to how many hours a day you're going to be using it. Those Yihua stations are cheap and quite well regarded for light-to-moderate use.
It does depend on your use case, yes. Though I have learnt my lesson after buying a well regarded Aoyue soldering station. I've had nothing but trouble with it. If I paid myself a moderate wage for all the time lost I'd easily have been able to buy myself a very nice top brand station. That's a mistake I won't repeat. Even when I'm just having a bit of fun tools need to do their job.
 

Offline SuperGiachi

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Re: Multimeter and soldering iron advice
« Reply #53 on: January 21, 2018, 06:46:55 am »
What about ERSA's icon pico and icon nano? Are they worth the money?
 

Offline ferdieCX

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Re: Multimeter and soldering iron advice
« Reply #54 on: January 21, 2018, 07:07:05 am »
I have an Ersa icon-2 and I am very satisfied with it. The soldering iron in the smaller icon use the same tips.
I bought my Ersa 30 in 1971 when I was 13, and it still works
 

Offline J Jones

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Re: Multimeter and soldering iron advice
« Reply #55 on: July 14, 2018, 10:27:54 pm »
Metcal just brought out a High Thermal Demand upgrade. Very impressive. The MX-5200 is pricey but has been worth the investment for me because I damage less boards by whipping off components too soon and pulling tracks AND get more success because there's less chance of dry joints on a gnd plane. And of course I can attempt things otherwise impossible with other irons. For example:
 

Offline tkamiya

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Re: Multimeter and soldering iron advice
« Reply #56 on: July 15, 2018, 10:44:55 am »
I have more than a dozen multi-meters.  My favorite is an analog meter from 1970s.  Back then, I used to use meter as an indicator to get rough idea.  It wasn't an instrument to get an accurate absolute value.  On the other extreme end, I have an HP digital 6 1/2 that has been professionally calibrated.  It will give me the value when that's important.  I also have a clamp meter combo that I take into attic, and I also have cheap disposable kind ($<20) for working with unknowns. 

The point I'm trying to make is, there is no such thing (for me) as THE nice meter.  I wouldn't take my HP that's most accurate to my attic to do mains work.  I also won't use analog meter to get a precise value on high impedance circuit.  But if I want to see a trend, analog meter is the best.  So I am kind of against the notion there IS a meter that's best.

If you are starting out, there is no reason to assume you'll be using it to work on high voltage or extremely low voltage.  It's not likely there would be a need to distinguish 5 volt and 5.1 volt.  Then, any meter around $50 will do.  Then as your needs change, you should start adding, not replacing. 

As to soldering irons, here, you will want to buy something good.  I like Hakko, and you could get one for $100 or so.  I also have a Chinese made ESD safe kind.  I paid something like 80 dollars and it's quite good.  I wouldn't use Radio Shack type or anything you'd find in harbor freifght type stores.  These will make soldering job much more taxing.  Soldering gun is a no-no for electronics work.  That's like taking a machete to work on ship-in-a-bottle project.
 

Offline arekm

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Re: Multimeter and soldering iron advice
« Reply #57 on: August 04, 2018, 11:40:00 pm »
I'm not aware of how the Quick 957DW is rated. I know the Quick 861DW is loved by many, but am careful to translate that to other models of the same brand.

Had Quick 706W and it was garbage. Now have Quick 861DW and Quick 202D and these are very, very nice. Totally different league than 706W, so indeed, be careful.
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Online ciccio

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Re: Multimeter and soldering iron advice
« Reply #58 on: August 05, 2018, 12:47:10 am »
Would a JBC electric temperature controlled iron be better that chinese stations like hakko etc?
What alloy do you usually use?

JBC temperature controlled (and also not temperature controlled) irons have a really stiff mains cable that is really annoyng in use.
Buy an Hakko station or a clone. They have a low voltage ion that has a more flexible cord.
Don't buy a gas soldering iron:it is not temperature controlled, and the torch/hot air will easily burn your PCB.
Alloy: 60/40 from a reputable manufacturer: I use Loctite (Multicore) Crystal 502 (leaded) 0.7 mm diameter, for most of my work.
Best regards
« Last Edit: August 05, 2018, 12:59:27 am by ciccio »
Ciccio

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