Author Topic: UNI-T UT61E Multimeter teardown photos.  (Read 300003 times)

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Offline plunger

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Re: UNI-T UT61E Multimeter teardown photos.
« Reply #100 on: January 27, 2012, 07:22:30 PM »
Are we able to use Fluke leads on this? I'm thinking about buying a set or one from Extech if it it would be ok.
 

Online Fraser

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Re: UNI-T UT61E Multimeter teardown photos.
« Reply #101 on: January 28, 2012, 12:27:07 AM »
Fluke leads with 4mm shrouded plugs will work fine....thankfully meter leads tend to follow an industry standard these days.

Aurora
« Last Edit: January 28, 2012, 02:57:12 AM by Aurora »
 

Online PedroDaGr8

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Re: UNI-T UT61E Multimeter teardown photos.
« Reply #102 on: January 29, 2012, 08:58:29 AM »
Mine finally came in (no clue what the delay was as it looked like it shipped when they said it did). Maybe my package didn't make the boat for chinese new year. :P

Now my general non-pro hobbyist opinions, comments and statements on the meter:
First off, this meter is SOLID. The body has NO give in it at all. Even with the screws removed. The external quality alone is VERY VERY nice in your hands. The rotary knob has a nice feel to it. It feels great when it snaps into the off position. Unlike Aurora my meter came with both an English and a chinese manual (two seperate manuals). My meter has the same modified board that Teknotronix shows. C41 and C42 are moved down closer to the slot (and out from under the resistor array). The resistor array is now vertial and soldered in properly. The changed layout of the capacitorson the side. Now only one piggy back capacitor at C9a. The rest are all normal. Silkscreen has been modified to better match the current part selection (no huge circles around CW1 and CW2). I have no clue how to find the build date.  Honestly, I am supper happy with this. This meter will serve my needs PERFECTLY! It really is kinda overkill for any hobbyist. 8)
The very existence of flamethrowers proves that some time, somewhere, someone said to themselves, "You know, I want to set those people over there on fire, but I'm just not close enough to get the job done." -George Carlin
 

Offline Teknotronix

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Re: UNI-T UT61E Multimeter teardown photos.
« Reply #103 on: January 29, 2012, 10:48:41 AM »
Mine finally came in (no clue what the delay was as it looked like it shipped when they said it did). Maybe my package didn't make the boat for chinese new year. :P

Now my general non-pro hobbyist opinions, comments and statements on the meter:
First off, this meter is SOLID. The body has NO give in it at all. Even with the screws removed. The external quality alone is VERY VERY nice in your hands. The rotary knob has a nice feel to it. It feels great when it snaps into the off position. Unlike Aurora my meter came with both an English and a chinese manual (two seperate manuals). My meter has the same modified board that Teknotronix shows. C41 and C42 are moved down closer to the slot (and out from under the resistor array). The resistor array is now vertial and soldered in properly. The changed layout of the capacitorson the side. Now only one piggy back capacitor at C9a. The rest are all normal. Silkscreen has been modified to better match the current part selection (no huge circles around CW1 and CW2). I have no clue how to find the build date.  Honestly, I am supper happy with this. This meter will serve my needs PERFECTLY! It really is kinda overkill for any hobbyist. 8)

I have to agree on all those points. It's very nice for the money.

The build date can be found on a little card inside the manuals.
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Online PedroDaGr8

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Re: UNI-T UT61E Multimeter teardown photos.
« Reply #104 on: January 29, 2012, 11:06:15 AM »
Mine has the same build date as yours. Oct. 27, 2011. That must be the most recent batch from that factory (or the most recent one currently in circulation).

And I agree, hands down a great meter for how little I spent! Thanks to dave for his review on the 61D and the comments on here for convincing me this was a great quality meter for the <$50 price range.
« Last Edit: January 29, 2012, 11:14:07 AM by PedroDaGr8 »
The very existence of flamethrowers proves that some time, somewhere, someone said to themselves, "You know, I want to set those people over there on fire, but I'm just not close enough to get the job done." -George Carlin
 

Offline Teknotronix

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Re: UNI-T UT61E Multimeter teardown photos.
« Reply #105 on: January 29, 2012, 11:15:07 AM »
Some nicer tear down shots :)

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Offline Lightages

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Re: UNI-T UT61E Multimeter teardown photos.
« Reply #106 on: January 29, 2012, 12:45:37 PM »
I think it is easy to say that the UT61E is a good buy, possibly one of the better deals that are available.

UNI-T must have different designers. Some have a clue, and some don't. I would not buy a UT71E again, but I most certainly would buy a UT61E.
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Offline Teknotronix

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Re: UNI-T UT61E Multimeter teardown photos.
« Reply #107 on: January 29, 2012, 01:21:48 PM »

You should drive the backlight leds with transistors. It will safer than old hack.


Taken from UT60E dmm schematic.

In this configuration, couldn't the same protection be achieved by only using a single NPN rather than the complementary config shown here?
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Offline plunger

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Re: UNI-T UT61E Multimeter teardown photos.
« Reply #108 on: January 29, 2012, 02:35:25 PM »
Fluke leads with 4mm shrouded plugs will work fine....thankfully meter leads tend to follow an industry standard these days.

I did end up getting a Fluke TL81A set. So far so good.

« Last Edit: January 31, 2012, 05:23:03 AM by plunger »
 

Re: UNI-T UT61E Multimeter teardown photos.
« Reply #109 on: January 29, 2012, 07:31:05 PM »
UNI-T must have different designers. Some have a clue, and some don't. I would not buy a UT71E again, but I most certainly would buy a UT61E.

Now imagine what happens if the next revision of the 61 happens to be done by the 71 designer. Then you start to get an idea why people keep recommending "overpriced" brands like Fluke. It is less of a gamble.
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Offline Teknotronix

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Re: UNI-T UT61E Multimeter teardown photos.
« Reply #110 on: January 29, 2012, 07:37:01 PM »
UNI-T must have different designers. Some have a clue, and some don't. I would not buy a UT71E again, but I most certainly would buy a UT61E.

Now imagine what happens if the next revision of the 61 happens to be done by the 71 designer. Then you start to get an idea why people keep recommending "overpriced" brands like Fluke. It is less of a gamble.

You are right. However sometimes people are limited to a budget and just have to make do with the best at a certain price point.
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Offline Teknotronix

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Re: UNI-T UT61E Multimeter teardown photos.
« Reply #111 on: February 03, 2012, 05:58:31 PM »
Deal is back on after I applied for a price comparison a few days ago. If you find a cheaper price on something and submit it to them, they update it a few days later :)

Use code DDVALENTINE to get another $10 off


http://www.dinodirect.com/multimeter-multifunction-digital-uni-t-ut61e-currency-AUD.html
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Offline vk6hdx

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Re: UNI-T UT61E Multimeter teardown photos.
« Reply #112 on: February 03, 2012, 06:48:44 PM »
Deal is back on after I applied for a price comparison a few days ago. If you find a cheaper price on something and submit it to them, they update it a few days later :)

Use code DDVALENTINE to get another $10 off


http://www.dinodirect.com/multimeter-multifunction-digital-uni-t-ut61e-currency-AUD.html

Good to see, It was a few dollars cheaper when I ordered it (still waiting for it to arrive).  I think it may have been 40% off "RRP" last time. Still looks like a good deal though.
 

Offline Teknotronix

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Re: UNI-T UT61E Multimeter teardown photos.
« Reply #113 on: February 03, 2012, 09:40:55 PM »
Deal has now ended :(
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Offline sdttn

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Re: UNI-T UT61E Multimeter teardown photos.
« Reply #114 on: February 04, 2012, 02:28:17 AM »
 

Online PedroDaGr8

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Re: UNI-T UT61E Multimeter teardown photos.
« Reply #115 on: February 04, 2012, 02:53:06 AM »
The very existence of flamethrowers proves that some time, somewhere, someone said to themselves, "You know, I want to set those people over there on fire, but I'm just not close enough to get the job done." -George Carlin
 

Offline Teknotronix

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Re: UNI-T UT61E Multimeter teardown photos.
« Reply #116 on: February 04, 2012, 03:40:35 AM »
Don't drone me bro!

 

Offline sdttn

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Re: UNI-T UT61E Multimeter teardown photos.
« Reply #117 on: February 04, 2012, 06:14:43 AM »
I suggest 409shop.
My first UT61E is from 409shop they are fast.
My dinodirect order is still on the way.

59.00$. Lowest price that I can found.  :D
http://www.409shop.com/409shop_product.php?id=103872
 

Online PedroDaGr8

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Re: UNI-T UT61E Multimeter teardown photos.
« Reply #118 on: February 05, 2012, 05:52:08 AM »
Just noticed that DinoDirect has a pricematch option. It could be possible to get the meter for $49. Use the pricematch ot get it down to $59, then use the DDValentine coupon code mentioned.
The very existence of flamethrowers proves that some time, somewhere, someone said to themselves, "You know, I want to set those people over there on fire, but I'm just not close enough to get the job done." -George Carlin
 

Offline ElectroElvis

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Re: UNI-T UT61E Multimeter teardown photos.
« Reply #119 on: February 05, 2012, 09:21:42 AM »
Today i ordered Uni-T UT71D for 149€ it should come in comming week. IT is from german shop PinSonne Elektronik. After long consideration i decidet for it since price/performance/features it is the best i could find here in EU.

Online PedroDaGr8

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Re: UNI-T UT61E Multimeter teardown photos.
« Reply #120 on: February 06, 2012, 12:06:02 PM »
As an update, because I was bored. I decided to do some resistance and capacitance measurements. I have some 0.1% metal film (or metal foil they use different names in different places) resistors from KOASpeer. I decided to test their resistance. The ones tested were either 1/3W or 1/4W resistors, though I did have 1/2W 0.1% resistors for 3 of the values. I did a spot check on these 1.2W resistors and they fell exactly in line with the values recoreded for the lower wattage varieties.

33.2K ohm
So actual value can range from 33.17K to 33.23K ohms.
The meters rated accuracy in this range is +/-0.5%. Which is a range of 33.03K to 33.37K
Resistor 1 reading:    33.09K
Resistor 2 reading:    33.09K
Resistor 3 reading:    33.09K
Resistor 4 reading:    33.08K
Resistor 5 reading:    33.09K
Resistor 6 reading:    33.10K
Resistor 7 reading:    33.09K
Resistor 8 reading:    33.08K
Resistor 9 reading:    33.09K
Resistor 10 reading:  33.09K
This gives an average reading of 33.089K which is (assuming the resistors are 33.2K) -0.334%. Which is well within the listed accuracy of the meter. Even assuming the worse case scenario of ALL of the resistor being 33.23K, the error is just -0.434%. The precision of both the meter and the resistors is surpisingly good too.

Next up is a 33.0K resistor.
The resistors would fall within the range of 32.967K to 33.033K
0.5% rated meter accuracy means the resistors should fall within 32.835K to 33.165K
Resistor 1: 32.89K
Resistor 2: 32.90K
Resistor 3: 32.90K
Resistor 4: 32.90K
Resistor 5: 32.90K
Resistor 6: 32.90K
Resistor 7: 32.89K
Resistor 8: 32.89K
This gives an average reading of 32.8975K which is (assuming the resistors are 33.2K) an error of -0.311%. Which is well within the listed accuracy of the meter. Even assuming the worse case scenario of ALL of the resistor being 33.033K, the error is just -0.410%. Once again the precision of the meter AND the resistors is quite good.

Next one is a 2K resistor:
The resistors would fall within the range of 1.998K to 2.002K
0.5% rated meter accuracy means the resistors should fall within 1.990K to 2.010K
Resistor 1 reading:    1.9947K
Resistor 2 reading:    1.9950K
Resistor 3 reading:    1.9948K
Resistor 4 reading:    1.9946K
Resistor 5 reading:    1.9951K
Resistor 6 reading:    1.9949K
Resistor 7 reading:    1.9949K
Resistor 8 reading:    1.9948K
Resistor 9 reading:    1.9946K
Resistor 10 reading:  1.9947K
This gives an average reading of 1.9948K which is (assuming the resistors are 2.0K) an error of -0.2595%. Which is well within the listed accuracy of the meter. Even assuming the worse case scenario of ALL of the resistor being 2.002K, the error is just -0.3591%. Once again the precision of the meter AND the resistors is quite good.

Next up are some 220K resistors. This is interesting because it falls on the edge of two ranges. 220Kohm which has a +/- 0.5% accuracy and 2.2Mohm which has a +/- 0.8% accuracy. I will list the 220Kohm range readings first then the 2.2Mohm range readings for the same resistor in parentheses following.
The resistors would fall within the range of 219.78K to 220.22K
0.5% rated meter accuracy for the 220Kohm  means the resistors should fall within 218.90K to 221.10K
0.8% rated meter accuracy for the 2.2Mohm range means the resistors should fall within 0.21824M to 0.22175M
Resistor 1: 219.67K (0.2192M)
Resistor 2: 219.69K (0.2193M)
Resistor 3: 219.68K (0.2193M)
Resistor 4: 219.68K (0.2193M)
Resistor 5: 219.68K (0.2192M)
Resistor 6: 219.65K (0.2192M)
Resistor 7: 219.67K (0.2192M)
Resistor 8: 219.68K (0.2192M)
Resistor 9: 219.69K (0.2192M)
Resistor 10: 219.68K (0.2192M)
This gives an average reading of 219.68K(0.21923M) which is, assuming the resistors are 220K(0.220M), an error of -0.147%(-0.350%). Which is well within the listed accuracy of the meter. Even assuming the worse case scenario of ALL of the resistor being 220.22K (0.2202M), the error is just -0.247%(-0.4495%). While clearly the 220k range appears to have better accuracy, the 2.2Mohm range still falls within the accuracy listed for the 220K range, which is better than its own.

In summary,  the meter appeared to do better than its rated accuracy which is what you would hope for something fresh from the factory.

Next up its capacitance time. To be honest I am not sure how to handle the errors of the capacitors. Often their listed range is larger than the range of the meter. My guess is just treat them as their nominal value and roll with it. For the sake of honesty I include the worst case scenario value as well.

First up are some Panasonic ECG Stacked Metal Film capacitors. They are rated 100V and 0.1uF +/-5%. The meter is rated at +/-3% in this range. The meter reads in nF in this range so the values should center around 100nF
The values for capacitance could range 0.95uF to 1.05uF
The meter should read 97.00nF to 103.00nF or a .06uF range.
Capacitor 1: 99.20nF
Capacitor 2: 101.17nF
Capacitor 3: 101.22nF
Capacitor 4: 99.27nF
Capacitor 5: 99.99nF
Capacitor 6: 100.36nF
Capacitor 7: 101.68nF
Capacitor 8: 99.28nF
Capacitor 9: 101.06nF
Capacitor 10: 99.66nF
THis gives an average value of 100.289nF which is an error of 0.289% from the expected value. In a worse case scenario where all were 105nF, the error becomes -4.48%. This is still within the error range of the capacitors themselves. So the meter does well.

Next up are some enormous UnitedChemicon 100V 2200uF caps. These things are 50mm long and 20mm wide. So 0.86 inches wide and about 2 inches tall. The meter uses the 2.2 mF (millifarad) range, which is the last one which is makes an accuracy claim for. It claims 4% accuracy.
These like most electrolytics have a +/- 20% rating.
Capacitor 1: 2.1790mF
Capacitor 2: 2.1764mF
Capacitor 3: 2.1758mF
Capacitor 4: 2.1787mF
Capacitor 5: 2.1756mF
THis gives an average value of 2.1771mF which is an error of 1.041% from the expected value. In a worse case scenario of an extreme 2.64mF, the error becomes -17.53%. This is still within the error range of the capacitors themselves. So the meter does well.

Lastly, I have some ESC (or SC) brand crap capacitors rated at 25V 120uF. These are the type of caps you expect to find spewing their guts everywhere in a PSU or in the VRM of a motherboard. I can't find out anything about them but my guess is like other cheap/basic capacitors they are rated at 20%.
Capacitor 1: 126.70uF
Capacitor 2: 127.00uF
Capacitor 3: 125.15uF
Capacitor 4: 128.28uF
Capacitor 5: 126.16uF
Capacitor 6: 127.01uF
Capacitor 7: 127.23uF
Capacitor 8: 129.54uF
Capacitor 9: 126.44uF
This gives an average value of 127.06uF which gives an error of 5.88%. The worst case scenario error is 32.35%. I really believe because of the suspect nature of these caps. The readings are fine, but the error falls with the caps themselves. If you notice they don't have nearly as precise values as the rest of the quality components I have measured. The massive 2200uF cap was consistant into the third digit, where these vary wildly.

So in summary, it seems that the meter is definitely capable of meeting its specified accuracy.
The very existence of flamethrowers proves that some time, somewhere, someone said to themselves, "You know, I want to set those people over there on fire, but I'm just not close enough to get the job done." -George Carlin
 

Online Fraser

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Re: UNI-T UT61E Multimeter teardown photos.
« Reply #121 on: February 06, 2012, 08:33:02 PM »
Nice work  :)

Its good to know that the meter is pretty accurate, in line with its specifications  :)  Where electrolytic capacitors are concerned I have ways considered their actual values to very variable so ballpark with low ESR is good enough for me. Its interesting to see the variance of value in the lower quality capacitors when compared to better parts.

Many thanks for taking the time to do the tests. For a long time I have used some 1% silver mica capacitors and 0.01% precision resistors (Ex 1980's Solartron 19" rack mount multimeter) to test my meters accuracy. They are very old parts now so it is time for me to source some replacements.

Aurora
 

Online PedroDaGr8

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Re: UNI-T UT61E Multimeter teardown photos.
« Reply #122 on: February 07, 2012, 08:41:39 AM »
Nice work  :)

Its good to know that the meter is pretty accurate, in line with its specifications  :)  Where electrolytic capacitors are concerned I have ways considered their actual values to very variable so ballpark with low ESR is good enough for me. Its interesting to see the variance of value in the lower quality capacitors when compared to better parts.

Many thanks for taking the time to do the tests. For a long time I have used some 1% silver mica capacitors and 0.01% precision resistors (Ex 1980's Solartron 19" rack mount multimeter) to test my meters accuracy. They are very old parts now so it is time for me to source some replacements.

Aurora

0.01% resistors would have been nice. Same with the 1% caps.

I was happy to see the device was well within spec as well. Very happy. All the better for sub-$50
The very existence of flamethrowers proves that some time, somewhere, someone said to themselves, "You know, I want to set those people over there on fire, but I'm just not close enough to get the job done." -George Carlin
 

Online Fraser

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Re: UNI-T UT61E Multimeter teardown photos.
« Reply #123 on: February 07, 2012, 09:36:17 AM »
My 0.01% resistors are pretty old so can't really be trusted now. They read right on my Fluke 87 III though so thats good enough for me  :)

They are HUGE black tubular things encased in black enamel, and mesuring from 15mm to 40mm in length and 10mm to 20mm in diameter ! Very odd looking components, fitted with solder tags and not wire ends. I also salvaged a Weston Cell from the same Solartron meter. The meter was a lab spec unit so had the Weston cell for self calaibration purposes. The cell is still functional but has reached the end of its useful life. You can predict the ageing of the cell in -mV per year quite accurately. My cell has reached the lowest p.d. acceptable for a reliable Weston Cell reference but it is still useful to check high impedance meters for basic accuracy.

 

Online PedroDaGr8

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Re: UNI-T UT61E Multimeter teardown photos.
« Reply #124 on: February 07, 2012, 03:59:48 PM »
My 0.01% resistors are pretty old so can't really be trusted now. They read right on my Fluke 87 III though so thats good enough for me  :)

They are HUGE black tubular things encased in black enamel, and mesuring from 15mm to 40mm in length and 10mm to 20mm in diameter ! Very odd looking components, fitted with solder tags and not wire ends. I also salvaged a Weston Cell from the same Solartron meter. The meter was a lab spec unit so had the Weston cell for self calaibration purposes. The cell is still functional but has reached the end of its useful life. You can predict the ageing of the cell in -mV per year quite accurately. My cell has reached the lowest p.d. acceptable for a reliable Weston Cell reference but it is still useful to check high impedance meters for basic accuracy.

Yay, mercury cadmium salts. Otherwise known as breakfast. :P Its funny those things are such a good standard but if someone tried bring up that idea today. Everyone would look at them as if they had a third head. You want to put liquid mercury and mercury salts in a cell with what? Cadmium salts too! I should know. I get that look all the time when I talk about making the various cadmium compounds that I make.
The very existence of flamethrowers proves that some time, somewhere, someone said to themselves, "You know, I want to set those people over there on fire, but I'm just not close enough to get the job done." -George Carlin
 


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