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SketchUp Help

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bostonman:

--- Quote ---This is like a 10 minute job to draw in fusion/solidworks/tinkercad/etc and there would be no fixing any mesh issues after.
Take the time to learn a new tool or find an old 64-bit PC on craigslist/facebook/garbage room. IMO.
--- End quote ---

I fully agree that a new computer is long overdue. As for the mesh errors, I am uncertain if it's just Sketchup that has issues, or if I'm doing something wrong that will carry over into other software.

From what I read, it seems Sketchup is just full of issues; and I'm somewhat discovering this myself.

thm_w:
See if you can find tutorial videos for solid modelling. Its basically impossible to draw incorrect geometry in eg fusion/solidworks with the basic tools, the program will tell you right away "you are trying to create a 0 thickness wall" etc. AFAIK at least...



bostonman:
I'll watch the video later today.

I'm not mechanical, but any drawings I've done up till now have been 2D. So I'm use to say wanting a box 1" away from an edge, so I'll draw a 1" line, draw one side of the box, erase the 1" line, and continue drawing the box knowing one side is exactly 1" away. With 2D (such as AutoCAD), what you see is what you get.

The feeling I'm getting with SketchUp (not that I'm defending the need to use it over other software) is that it's extremely basic and not smart. The cover that I was having issues with is for a very basic box I designed using the same methods (laid out a rectangle, gave it some thickness with push/pull, scaled the outer edge of the rectangle, and gave that height using push/pull). I built a circuit and was afraid the exposed leads would short, so I created a rectangular box as a way to practice.

The recent project (the cover to cover the box) was a way to practice a bit more and have a cut out on top for DIP switches. The assumption I have is the mesh issues were a result of incorporating my 2D experiences into 3D work. I'm guessing SketchUp saw some extra lines I used to get the cutout in a particular location and I forgot to delete them (or was unaware they were reinserted after performing an 'undo'), and it created triangles.

Using the automatic repair in the software is nice, but, if I'm making errors, I'd like to avoid them instead of having the computer fix them for me (it's similar to saying I don't need to learn English because auto correct will fix it for me). I think at this point SketchUp is too basic and I'm getting frustrated over issues that are not necessarily due to my inabilities, but because SketchUp needs to be pampered.

As stated, the cover scale wasn't correct (I appreciate the time everyone put into fixing it), and I tried sizing it down by 25.4 (thinking it was in inches and needed to convert it to mm, however, that didn't work. Ironically, I took a guess at reducing it to 10%, held it side-by-side in the slicing software to the box I made, estimated the comparison looked like the correct size, printed it last night, and it was exactly the correct fit. I don't know why 10% worked, however, as stated above, it's a matter of pampering SketchUp and think it's a waste of mental resources to worry too much about it.

In any case, one thing I learned from this recent thread: the slicing software interprets dimensions as mm, so now I use those units of measure instead of inches.

Even though I'm on the electronics side, I'll admit, mechanical drawings are fun.

Bassman59:

--- Quote from: bostonman on November 20, 2021, 02:37:52 pm ---I'll watch the video later today.

I'm not mechanical, but any drawings I've done up till now have been 2D. So I'm use to say wanting a box 1" away from an edge, so I'll draw a 1" line, draw one side of the box, erase the 1" line, and continue drawing the box knowing one side is exactly 1" away. With 2D (such as AutoCAD), what you see is what you get.
--- End quote ---

One thing I had to grok when starting with 3D modeling (I'm an EE) is that there's no set notion of "origin." Everything is relative to everything else. I use Fusion360 (and I'm sure SolidWorks is similar) instead of Sketchup so I don't know how they differ, but if you want to draw a 1" box, you create a sketch and draw a box with the sides constrained to be 1". Then other things in the design are relative to that box. All of the drawing tools let you specify size and you can reference features to all sorts of other features. (It's really powerful.)


--- Quote ---The recent project (the cover to cover the box) was a way to practice a bit more and have a cut out on top for DIP switches. The assumption I have is the mesh issues were a result of incorporating my 2D experiences into 3D work. I'm guessing SketchUp saw some extra lines I used to get the cutout in a particular location and I forgot to delete them (or was unaware they were reinserted after performing an 'undo'), and it created triangles.
--- End quote ---

I don't know what PCB CAD software you use, nor do I know whether Sketchup allows it, but with Kicad (and Altium) I export STEP files of the entire PCBA, which is board and parts, and then import that into F360 and I build an enclosure around the board. This way, there's no measuring to know where to locate the holes for your encoder. Simply create a sketch for the front panel, set a sketch point for the center of the encoder shaft, and draw a circle with a diameter slightly larger than the mechanical bits. When you extrude the panel, you have a hole of the correct size.

It's really cool when you make a box for your electronics, and the cut-outs for the front and rear panels all just match with your connectors and lights and buttons and it all just goes together.


--- Quote ---In any case, one thing I learned from this recent thread: the slicing software interprets dimensions as mm, so now I use those units of measure instead of inches.
--- End quote ---

Always work in metric!


--- Quote ---Even though I'm on the electronics side, I'll admit, mechanical drawings are fun.

--- End quote ---

Agreed!

bostonman:

--- Quote ---It's really cool when you make a box for your electronics, and the cut-outs for the front and rear panels all just match with your connectors and lights and buttons and it all just goes together.
--- End quote ---


It is cool.

I've attached two pictures of what the box was being used for. The IC socket sits in a socket I made to protect the pins, and the cover is the part that was repaired by thm_w.

It was a breadboard design and not done in PCB software, however, I'm fully aware that the PCB can be exported and can't wait to have an actual project to create a full PCB and box printed to size.

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