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Showing circuits on job interview

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Zad:
One thing that isn't obvious to the digital/software generation is amateur radio. Because I went the conventional A-level Maths/Physics/Computing route at 18 rather than the college diploma, I felt there was something lacking in my education. So I took a night class that lead to the amateur radio exams. I have always been into radio, so it seemed an obvious thing to do. I don't have the time or money to do "proper" amateur radio now, and to be honest it seems to be mostly people spending cash on multi thousand pound setups, but I always put it in my CV (that's resumé to the colonials). More often than not, someone interviewing me will be qualified too, so you have common ground and it instantly puts you on their "side". Even if the aren't qualified, because so little RF is taught nowadays, there is instant respect that you can do "the difficult stuff" which is increasingly akin to black magic. The question you really want to hear is "oh do you make your own gear?" - that lets you steer the interview your way.

Time:
I have a CV (curriculum vitae) and a resume (I am American).  Depending on who you are depends on which one you get.





--- Quote from: Zad on October 14, 2010, 03:37:14 am ---One thing that isn't obvious to the digital/software generation is amateur radio. Because I went the conventional A-level Maths/Physics/Computing route at 18 rather than the college diploma, I felt there was something lacking in my education. So I took a night class that lead to the amateur radio exams. I have always been into radio, so it seemed an obvious thing to do. I don't have the time or money to do "proper" amateur radio now, and to be honest it seems to be mostly people spending cash on multi thousand pound setups, but I always put it in my CV (that's resumé to the colonials). More often than not, someone interviewing me will be qualified too, so you have common ground and it instantly puts you on their "side". Even if the aren't qualified, because so little RF is taught nowadays, there is instant respect that you can do "the difficult stuff" which is increasingly akin to black magic. The question you really want to hear is "oh do you make your own gear?" - that lets you steer the interview your way.



--- End quote ---

ChrisGammell:
The resume vs. CV debate in my mind goes like this:

CV -- You're an academic. You want to show off your publications and other non-workplace, yet hopefully relevant information.
Resume -- You're showing off past workplace experience and possibly some of the specific tools you have used in the past.

I didn't realize it was a geographical term.

Zero999:
I thought they were the same thing: CV is UK English, resume is British English.

I don't think employers should care but if you're applying for a UK based job, use a British spell checker and avoid Americanisms and if you're applying for a US based job use a US spell checker.

Simon:
it is probably also a thing with what is fashionable now, it is probably and age thing too

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