Author Topic: Capacitor that looks like a resistor?  (Read 4530 times)

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Offline Harb

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Re: Capacitor that looks like a resistor?
« Reply #25 on: February 19, 2018, 01:10:46 pm »
R26 is easy, its 0 ohms .......although there may be some resistance at the left hand end  ;)
 

Offline Brumby

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Re: Capacitor that looks like a resistor?
« Reply #26 on: February 19, 2018, 02:37:28 pm »
I always smile at "zero" ohm resistors.

They are all outside any percentage tolerance ... unless they are really, really cold.
 

Offline bson

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Re: Capacitor that looks like a resistor?
« Reply #27 on: February 20, 2018, 08:11:13 am »
It probably doesn't matter if it's 33pF or 82pF... the factory probably just used whatever happened to be cheaper the day they placed the order. :)

Similarly, I doubt it matters much what it's replaced with, and 47pF would probably also work just dandy.
 

Offline Skyfox

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Re: Capacitor that looks like a resistor?
« Reply #28 on: February 23, 2018, 05:22:14 am »
R26 is 0? because this board is made for NTSC.  If it was made for a PAL system it would have been a 100? resistor.  A couple other components would have been different, too.
 

Offline Architect

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Re: Capacitor that looks like a resistor?
« Reply #29 on: June 24, 2018, 07:02:57 am »
Just yesterday I was baffled when my LCR tester said that what I thought was a 8.2 Ohm resistor was in fact a 8.2 pF capacitor. Much the same experience as "Nelson Derks" described in "Mystery Capacitor Type" in eham.net.

Anyway, I have several of these creatures in the values 8.2 pF, 39 pF, 68 pF, 330 pF and 1.5 nF.  So if anyone needs a few, just drop me a line.
 

Offline Gemman Aster

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Re: Capacitor that looks like a resistor?
« Reply #30 on: August 30, 2018, 08:09:47 pm »
I have an Atari motherboard that is full of identical capacitors to these. Given by the time my 130XE was made Atari and Commodore were the same company I suppose it is unsurprizing they drew from the same stock! In places it also uses what look like tiny SMT capacitors sealed inside glass tubes.

Is it acceptable to swap modern ceramic disc capacitors for these old, unusual types?
 


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