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Bus Pirate

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SuperMiguel:
Any of you guys use the Bus Pirate? whats the point of it? i know it can be use as a very slow scope, a programmer and a logic analizer... But the documentation states that is not good at any of this 3.. So whats the point of it?  what can you do with it

alm:
I use it mainly for serial interfaces like 1-wire, I2C, SPI. For example, I recently used it to read and program an I2C EEPROM. Sure, I could have hooked up a micro and spend some time writing a program and debugging it, but a finished product is nicer and faster. I believe the original intent was to allow quick prototyping and experimentation with new devices/sensors. The terminal-like interface is much faster than re-programming a micro each time you want to change some setting like speed or polarity.

gonnafail:
I have one and it is one of my favorite pieces of kit. When ever I am working with a new IC I will connect it to the bus pirate and use that to step through initialization sequence and get the chip up and running. I find that datasheets are always lacking a section that simply and clearly states that to get the IC working do X then Y followed by Z. Some trial and error is always needed and so I do this trial and error with the bus pirate. Then when I am confident about the operation programming the micro is easy as I have an understanding of what needs to be done. It is also really nice for troubleshooting circuits, if you are having problems with a circuit not working quite right you can connect it up to sections of the circuit and use it in place of the micro. So you can connect it up and verify that the circuit is good then you know the issue is in the micro. For I think was $30, it is the most bang for buck device I own.
I have no affiliation with the product just a very happy customer.

SuperMiguel:

--- Quote from: gonnafail on October 29, 2010, 01:37:04 am ---I have one and it is one of my favorite pieces of kit. When ever I am working with a new IC I will connect it to the bus pirate and use that to step through initialization sequence and get the chip up and running. I find that datasheets are always lacking a section that simply and clearly states that to get the IC working do X then Y followed by Z. Some trial and error is always needed and so I do this trial and error with the bus pirate. Then when I am confident about the operation programming the micro is easy as I have an understanding of what needs to be done. It is also really nice for troubleshooting circuits, if you are having problems with a circuit not working quite right you can connect it up to sections of the circuit and use it in place of the micro. So you can connect it up and verify that the circuit is good then you know the issue is in the micro. For I think was $30, it is the most bang for buck device I own.
I have no affiliation with the product just a very happy customer.

--- End quote ---

is there a guide on how to actually do that?

gonnafail:
http://dangerousprototypes.com/docs/Bus_Pirate

That is the link to Bus Pirate section of Dangerous Prototypes. They design the Bus Pirate. From that page you can get to the manual, tutorials, examples, anything you would need to know.

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