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C learning

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SuperMiguel:
whats the best way to finish learning C? like i know how to make small programs, that perfrom small calculations and that make small decitions. I can how to scan, print, while loops... But still not to a point where i can program avr chips or feel really confortable with C..

Like i can do arduino code with no problem (i know im not that great on it but i feel a bit confortable to a point that i built a small robot (http://forums.adafruit.com/viewtopic.php?f=25&t=14402))

On AVR i can do realllllly basic stuff like turn a light on and off... but thats prob about it...

So should i go back to making C programs? or should i keep going forward with AVR

And with any of choices what should i do to get better? or to cross that basic line?

Mechatrommer:
learn C in PC first then move to mcu programming when you comfortable with C.

SuperMiguel:

--- Quote from: shafri on September 16, 2010, 02:38:32 am ---learn C in PC first then move to mcu programming when you comfortable with C.

--- End quote ---

what would the best way for me to do that? a book?

EEVblog:
There are two issues at play here.
The first is knowing C and it's syntax. That simply comes with experience, and it makes no real difference what your target platform is (PC, AVR, PIC etc)

The second is knowing how to access the resources on the AVR chip. Things like setting up registers, using peripherals, reading/writing I/O etc. If you stick with Arduino then most of this is hidden from you.

But if you really want to learn microcontrollers then you have to learn to start using the resources on the chip. Start with I/O and then work your up to things like timers, interrupts, UART's, I2C/SPI etc. You usually need to do this on physical hardware so you can see some form of physical result. C really has nothing to do with learning stuff like this, it's the same process for assembler, BASIC, C or whatever, it's just that the syntax is different.

Dave.

SuperMiguel:
Start with I/O and then work your up to things like timers, interrupts, UART's, I2C/SPI etc

umm is there a guide on this? or a book?

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