Author Topic: choosing/understanding the right powersuply for the TS100  (Read 19899 times)

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Offline paulca

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Re: choosing/understanding the right powersuply for the TS100
« Reply #50 on: April 08, 2018, 11:06:52 am »
KISS.  Keep it simple stupid.

Buy a grounded (3 pin) laptop supply.  Standard 19V one.  The higher the current the better.  Too much isn't going to hurt anything.  4A-6A is great.

When it arrives and your TS100 arrives, there is a chance it will just plug in and work.  Iteration 1, you have a working soldering iron.  There is a remote chance the laptop supply has a DC connector that won't fit.  So just buy another one and retro fit it.  It's just two wires.  It's not hard, just buy one of those ones with screw terminals if you don't want to splice/solder it.

Then you can refine things with the silicon flexible burn proof lead at your leisure.

Note, the ferrite ring is only to help combat the switch more power supply noise from upsetting the laptop, particularly the audio, which frankly the TS100 will not give a damn about.
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Offline analogo

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Re: choosing/understanding the right powersuply for the TS100
« Reply #51 on: April 08, 2018, 12:24:02 pm »
The only other differentiators I can see are that both PSUs include an interference suppression ferrite core on the output leads, however the one on the Bicker is 80mm from the PSU, whereas the Meanwell one is 70mm from the DC jack. That would clearly be undesirable if you are plugging directly into the TS100!

Why are ferrite cores on output leads "undesiderable" when the power supply is plugged directly into the TS100?
 

Offline Gyro

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Re: choosing/understanding the right powersuply for the TS100
« Reply #52 on: April 08, 2018, 12:44:31 pm »
The only other differentiators I can see are that both PSUs include an interference suppression ferrite core on the output leads, however the one on the Bicker is 80mm from the PSU, whereas the Meanwell one is 70mm from the DC jack. That would clearly be undesirable if you are plugging directly into the TS100!

Why are ferrite cores on output leads "undesiderable" when the power supply is plugged directly into the TS100?

Because you don't want one dangling off the back of your soldering iron! If you read above, one has it near the PSU, the other near the plug.
« Last Edit: April 08, 2018, 12:47:10 pm by Gyro »
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Offline VEGETA

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Re: choosing/understanding the right powersuply for the TS100
« Reply #53 on: April 08, 2018, 12:56:05 pm »
Why don't get Yihua 908D? simple and powerful! I tried it and I can recommend.
 

Offline paulca

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Re: choosing/understanding the right powersuply for the TS100
« Reply #54 on: April 08, 2018, 01:54:42 pm »
Why don't get Yihua 908D? simple and powerful! I tried it and I can recommend.

Because one is a cheap clone of another iron and nobody really knows it's quality.  Chinese Product + Mains = No thanks.  Have you checked it for Earthing and mains leakage?  It's almost certainly an old technology separate element and tip which means the temperature will not be stable or even present when it's important.

The TS100 is tiny, lightweight, new technology, DC powered, micro-controller controlled, open source software and hardware, heats up almost instantly and stable in temperature, plus with the right size of power supply it's very powerful.

Did I miss anything?

EDIT: oh, yes, it's pretty, portable, battery option powered...
"What could possibly go wrong?"
Current Open Projects:  3 Channel Audio mixer with DAC, BT, pre-amps and h/phone amp, WS281x LED controller Version 2 5V/5A w/Atmega328, FY6600 Power supply, 5A DC Load (Still!)
 

Offline TuxKey

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Re: choosing/understanding the right powersuply for the TS100
« Reply #55 on: April 08, 2018, 04:15:18 pm »

Have you read this entire thread, only 2 pages? Reason I ask, is most of you new questions have been answered.

This power supply is all you need:

https://www.tme.eu/en/details/gst90a24-p1m/desktop-power-supplies/mean-well/

i have read all the comment's and the reason is i'm trying to understand and not just do..
i downloaded the TS100 manual and the power supply your pointing to is exactly the max specs of the iron...(page 5 of the manual)
24v 2.7amps and they recomment 19v 2.1amps..

the reason i'm asking reading is that i want to learn and understand why i'm going for a or option b instead..

from what i understand until until now.
1) use a 24v supply (no more than that)
2) more amps is ok but don't go overboard and after seeing this vid probably stay near the 2.7A.
https://youtu.be/g-xXSJagz_A
reason a faulty tip could result in a short of the mosfet (did'nt even know what a mosfet was before today  :palm:)
3 getting more power could be a good idea but again no need to go overboard. Running the power supply at lower load could be beneficial to longevity say 90wats more than enough keeping the price low..

So that's where i'm at now..
 
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Offline TuxKey

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Re: choosing/understanding the right powersuply for the TS100
« Reply #56 on: April 08, 2018, 04:16:43 pm »
It's fairly simple.  Buy a 19V laptop supply.  The higher the amp rating the better.  It will work better than any iron you have used before.

ok will do. i understand.
 

Offline TuxKey

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Re: choosing/understanding the right powersuply for the TS100
« Reply #57 on: April 08, 2018, 04:19:54 pm »
@Gyro

You mentioned that : In practice, you will probably want to add a short length of burnproof flexible Silicone cord for comfortable handling.


Sounds good where do i get such a cord? and do i replace the main cord that is attached to the powersuply or ad it on top?
btw i found a different store for a second powersuply if the one @mdijkens is providing doesn't work out for sum reason.

https://www.tme.eu/en/katalog/desktop-power-supplies_113629/#id_category=113629&s_field=artykul&s_order=ASC&visible_params=2%2C32%2C36%2C98%2C317%2C364%2C364%2C622%2C637%2C637%2C2503%2C2706&used_params=364%3A29982%3B637%3A2454%3B

i'm going to buy all my soldering supplies from them

I bought my cable from this UK listing... https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Twin-Core-Silicone-Rubber-Cable-2x0-4mm-Conductors-6amp-DC-Wiring-Cord/152000411964?hash=item2363ee393c:g:eBcAAOSwll1W1cRU

... and plug from here (5.5mm x 2.5mm Fork) https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/DC-Power-Plug-Socket-Male-Female-Barrel-Connector-Multiple-Sizes-Available/292033926253?hash=item43fe94146d:m:mUesRQQNWhwM4BtX-0CbALg


extremely helpful thanks...already saved the links..
Will see if i can find the same products from the tme.eu shop since i'm going to order more gear from them..
 

Offline MacMeter

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Re: choosing/understanding the right powersuply for the TS100
« Reply #58 on: April 08, 2018, 06:10:18 pm »

Have you read this entire thread, only 2 pages? Reason I ask, is most of you new questions have been answered.

This power supply is all you need:

https://www.tme.eu/en/details/gst90a24-p1m/desktop-power-supplies/mean-well/

i have read all the comment's and the reason is i'm trying to understand and not just do..
i downloaded the TS100 manual and the power supply your pointing to is exactly the max specs of the iron...(page 5 of the manual)
24v 2.7amps and they recomment 19v 2.1amps..

the reason i'm asking reading is that i want to learn and understand why i'm going for a or option b instead..

from what i understand until until now.
1) use a 24v supply (no more than that)
2) more amps is ok but don't go overboard and after seeing this vid probably stay near the 2.7A.
https://youtu.be/g-xXSJagz_A
reason a faulty tip could result in a short of the mosfet (did'nt even know what a mosfet was before today  :palm:)
3 getting more power could be a good idea but again no need to go overboard. Running the power supply at lower load could be beneficial to longevity say 90wats more than enough keeping the price low..

So that's where i'm at now..

I appreciate you are most likely on a limited budget, at least here in the US, on Amazon, you can get the TS100 KIT, it comes with the 19 volt PSU and one tip for $65 US. I wanted the full 65 Watts the unit can deliver, so I wanted a 24 volt PSU, and would have preferred buying just the iron for less, but they only sold the kit package on Amazon. You can buy just the iron alone, and these are available on all the usual Chinese sites. First, I don’t like waiting for 6 week deliveries from those sites, and if the product has any issues, Amazon’s return policy is very easy and good, so I pay a bit more for those two factors.

I watched the video you linked, I remember watching his glowing first review, same guy. Did you read the text he posted on his YouTube review?

He states: “However, if you use a power supply with which can deliver more than 5A, you risk that the maximal current (5A) of the MOSFET is exceeded and you burn it - when the tip fails.”

You see he says “WHEN THE TIP FAILS”. These inexpensive TS100’s have been on the market for over 1.5 years now and I have never seen any online posts complaining about failed tips, I own 6 tips, they all work fine, but granted anything can break, seems he got a bad tip, and used it twice on two different TS100’s, with the same bad results. As someone who over research’s products, (not as much as you :), I’ll tell you, at some point you have to jump in the pool to get wet! I’m just glad I’m not your new car salesman.

The 24 volt MeanWell PSU that I and others here have recommended is NOT 5 amps. If it concerns you, simply buy the KIT with the 19 volt PSU, or buy one with the same specs.

Seems he is using whatever power supply he had on hand, but the main issue he had was a FAILED TIP or TIPS. He had this problem twice, so I assume he used the same “shorted” tip on his 2nd unit, and broke that one as well. It makes sense to use a DMM and check the tips before first use.

If you don’t want to bother making your own silicone cable, I posted the solution for that in one of my earlier responses to you in this thread.

Sounds like you may be a better candidate for a more standard soldering station where you don’t have to worry or wonder about these details. You could buy cheap Chinese clones of know brands, or better yet save up for an original Hakko 951, or the new Pace 200, for about $240 US. Those dedicated soldering stations should last for many, many years. I suspect at the price point of the TS100, it will fail far sooner, and the money spent on it will be lost. Thankfully not an issue for me at this time, and I wanted to try it out since it uses the new direct drive temp sensing tips, which both the Hakko and Pace units use. Just remember, compared to the two I mentioned, many people here and online consider the TS100 as a TOY. I understand where they are coming from, and if I were a solder pro, semi-pro, or needed long term reliability, with good customer support, I’d buy either of the other two. Since I don’t solder much, my needs are far less demanding, and I hope I get a decent amount of life out of a TS100. If not, I didn’t lose much investment in it.

Good luck on whatever you decide.
 

Offline TuxKey

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Re: choosing/understanding the right powersuply for the TS100
« Reply #59 on: April 08, 2018, 08:09:25 pm »


I appreciate you are most likely on a limited budget, at least here in the US, on Amazon, you can get the TS100 KIT, it comes with the 19 volt PSU and one tip for $65 US. I wanted the full 65 Watts the unit can deliver, so I wanted a 24 volt PSU, and would have preferred buying just the iron for less, but they only sold the kit package on Amazon. You can buy just the iron alone, and these are available on all the usual Chinese sites. First, I don’t like waiting for 6 week deliveries from those sites, and if the product has any issues, Amazon’s return policy is very easy and good, so I pay a bit more for those two factors.

to be 100% honest with you i did check amazon for the TS100 with power supply but found it to expensive for what it was.
mainly a normal TS100 with a cheap power supply. Even if i would have to pay $10 or $20 more i would rather buy the TS100 from banggood and buying a good power supply from a reputable place like tme.eu


I watched the video you linked, I remember watching his glowing first review, same guy. Did you read the text he posted on his YouTube review?

He states: “However, if you use a power supply with which can deliver more than 5A, you risk that the maximal current (5A) of the MOSFET is exceeded and you burn it - when the tip fails.”

You see he says “WHEN THE TIP FAILS”. These inexpensive TS100’s have been on the market for over 1.5 years now and I have never seen any online posts complaining about failed tips, I own 6 tips, they all work fine, but granted anything can break, seems he got a bad tip, and used it twice on two different TS100’s, with the same bad results.

i did notice he pointed out that if you have a power supply that can provide more then 5A and the the tip fails which results in damaging the mosfet that can't handle all that current.. That was the reason he went with a higher rated mosfet..
my conclusion was don't grab a power supply that can provide more amps than the mosfet can handle unless you want to buy a second one and do the repair he did *lol* could be a learning experience hahah...

As someone who over research’s products, (not as much as you :), I’ll tell you, at some point you have to jump in the pool to get wet! I’m just glad I’m not your new car salesman.
sum times i jump in blindly but like i told you earlier.. i'm doing this to learn as much as wanting to mod my mechanical keyboards.

The 24 volt MeanWell PSU that I and others here have recommended is NOT 5 amps. If it concerns you, simply buy the KIT with the 19 volt PSU, or buy one with the same specs.
Seems he is using whatever power supply he had on hand, but the main issue he had was a FAILED TIP or TIPS. He had this problem twice, so I assume he used the same “shorted” tip on his 2nd unit, and broke that one as well. It makes sense to use a DMM and check the tips before first use.

If you don’t want to bother making your own silicone cable, I posted the solution for that in one of my earlier responses to you in this thread.
i appreciated your response very insightful and i'm not just saying that (not that type of person)...

Sounds like you may be a better candidate for a more standard soldering station where you don’t have to worry or wonder about these details. You could buy cheap Chinese clones of know brands, or better yet save up for an original Hakko 951, or the new Pace 200, for about $240 US. Those dedicated soldering stations should last for many, many years. I suspect at the price point of the TS100, it will fail far sooner, and the money spent on it will be lost. Thankfully not an issue for me at this time, and I wanted to try it out since it uses the new direct drive temp sensing tips, which both the Hakko and Pace units use. Just remember, compared to the two I mentioned, many people here and online consider the TS100 as a TOY. I understand where they are coming from, and if I were a solder pro, semi-pro, or needed long term reliability, with good customer support, I’d buy either of the other two. Since I don’t solder much, my needs are far less demanding, and I hope I get a decent amount of life out of a TS100. If not, I didn’t lose much investment in it.

Good luck on whatever you decide.
Two years ago i wanted to get in to audio tech and jumped in without looking..i just said don't want to spend the time to research just give me the best closed headphones out there with the best soundstage..So i bought a $1100 T5p from Beyerdynamic...
And bought a cheaper headphone amp..
Turns out it's a wonderful headphone but my years as a marine sniper turned out not so good for my hearing and i can enjoy them but not as much as i thought.. so now they sit in their box and my cheap Chinese headphones are used on the go and i just throw them around.. Like you said as a toy.. 

Why am i telling you this?? well to explain why i'm not buying a Hakko FM-204. That was my first plan..
But now i bought (already ordered) the TS100 and a Aoyue 474 (old model without the ++)..

My wife made me promise to  start easy if i would like the hobby and stick with it.. not just build a couple of keyboards and mod a couple of them. then when we move from this smaller apartment i would have room for a work bench and buy something like the FX-951...

Btw i'm getting a power supply from an awesome guy that also live in The Netherlands he offered to make me one from a power supply he had laying around i belive he said 19v... and perhaps i'l buy a spare 24v from tme.eu desktop supply that you mentioned here 24v one with 4.5a or a tad more and something a tad above 65w 90 or something with plug already on it.. later one i'l buy a silicone cable and learn how to mod it test it buy a cheap multi-meter and continue to learn..

Thanks again for your input really appreciate it. i will use this post as a reference to come back to if i forget something..
and i hope others will do the same when having questions related to the TS100 ..
 

Offline MacMeter

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Re: choosing/understanding the right powersuply for the TS100
« Reply #60 on: April 08, 2018, 08:23:37 pm »
I just had a back and forth with that YouTube reviewer, and was exactly as I thought. He had a bad tip, didn’t test read it first, and was using a 10 amp PSU, which would still be fine if his tip was not shorted. The kits with the 19v PSU are perhaps their choice to save money and keep the kit costs down, but for me personally, I wanted to get their units rated and advertised 65 watt output, which is only possible with the 24 volt PSU.

So I recommend that TS100 users test read their tips when new, before heating them up. And if you get a TIP WARNING, to immediately disconnect the power. I logged my tips when new:

TS-B2 = 7.1 ohms.
TS-BC2 = 7.1 ohms.
TS-C1 = 8.6 ohms.
TS-K = 8.6 ohms.
 

Offline TuxKey

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Re: choosing/understanding the right powersuply for the TS100
« Reply #61 on: April 09, 2018, 10:50:37 am »
I just had a back and forth with that YouTube reviewer, and was exactly as I thought. He had a bad tip, didn’t test read it first, and was using a 10 amp PSU, which would still be fine if his tip was not shorted. The kits with the 19v PSU are perhaps their choice to save money and keep the kit costs down, but for me personally, I wanted to get their units rated and advertised 65 watt output, which is only possible with the 24 volt PSU.

So I recommend that TS100 users test read their tips when new, before heating them up. And if you get a TIP WARNING, to immediately disconnect the power. I logged my tips when new:

TS-B2 = 7.1 ohms.
TS-BC2 = 7.1 ohms.
TS-C1 = 8.6 ohms.
TS-K = 8.6 ohms.

Awesome list alas the extra tip i ordered (chisel tip) TS-D24 for true hole soldering is not on there..
But it don't have a multi meter anyways so it will have to wait for in the future..
Also my first thought was how does one measure the ohms on such a tip?
so i went looking on youtube..and found Marco Reps doing a mod of his TS100..here it is starts at 03:34 where he starts measuring his tip..
https://youtu.be/M-EaxWU70xM?t=3m34s

btw i'm going to buy a cheap multimeter to start of with thinking of getting one from the supermarket store Lidl
(don't laugh to hard i know cheap it's not a fluke.)

i thought the Powerfix 2018 model would be better then the "Aneng AN8009"

here are both vids:

The lidle €15 +€3 shipping so total €18.
EU testing and the review looks good he does a few tests also with mains !! scary i was hoping all the time that nothing would go wrong.
https://youtu.be/ufx3rhCTmpY

And the more expensive Aneg AN8009 €24 free shipping but will take a long time to get here ..
https://youtu.be/TP4kzXdJIF4

I think the Lidle one is good enough and a has 3yr warranty hahah
 

Offline Gyro

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Re: choosing/understanding the right powersuply for the TS100
« Reply #62 on: April 09, 2018, 11:44:12 am »
That Lidl one actually isn't bad for basic use. There is a fairly long recent thread on it... https://www.eevblog.com/forum/testgear/heads-up-cheap-multimeter-lidl-uk-(080218)/

Probably best to ask any questions about it there (if you have any).
« Last Edit: April 09, 2018, 11:47:01 am by Gyro »
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Offline TuxKey

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Re: choosing/understanding the right powersuply for the TS100
« Reply #63 on: April 17, 2018, 07:31:37 pm »
I use an old 24V 6.5A Laptop charger. Works great.

Cable Wise I would highly recommend this cable type, soft as silk and high temperature resistant (does not melt even with the iron all the way up).

https://www.designacable.com/2-core-high-temperature-silicone-rubber-cable-2x0-25mm-4amp-dc-wiring-black-orange-green.html

Note that they also do a 6A 2 x 0.4mm^2 version which is also very flexible and a good diameter match for the high current 5.5x2.5mm jacks. I have 1m lengths of both but prefer the 6A one for the way it flexes more smoothly and balances the iron better (and slightly lower voltage drop). The thinner one is probably better for portable battery use though.

https://www.designacable.com/twin-conductor-silicone-rubber-cable-2x0-4mm-6amp-suitable-for-dc-applications.html

Hi Gyro and everyone else..
So i bought a decent power supply "GST90A24-P1M" €24,20 half the cost of the TS100 but i did not  want to skimp on something i plug in to the mains..

i'm very interested about the power cable you mentioned..
"Twin Core Silicone Rubber Cable. (2x0.4mm Conductor). 6amp. Suitable for DC Applications"

But i have no idea how to proceed?
can i keep the brand new power supply in tact or do i need to cut in to it ??
Is it possible to diy sum sort of flexible heat resistant extension cable for it ?
i would probably get the chicken and the egg problem needing to solder on to a power cable without having a second power source..

i tried searching for "soldering power jack" and "Soldering a DC connector to a cable" but did not find anyone explaining it ...

i think diy the silicone cable you mentioned to something like this.. might be the best solution..? Sort of a flexible soldering extension light and heat proof sounds good to me..
 

Offline TuxKey

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Re: choosing/understanding the right powersuply for the TS100
« Reply #64 on: April 17, 2018, 07:34:44 pm »
That Lidl one actually isn't bad for basic use. There is a fairly long recent thread on it... https://www.eevblog.com/forum/testgear/heads-up-cheap-multimeter-lidl-uk-(080218)/

Probably best to ask any questions about it there (if you have any).

Thanks Gyro...i'm going to get the lidl model soon..thanks for the link to the post very useful.. there are a couple of nice youtube vids on using a multimeter so that's great..
 

Offline MacMeter

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Re: choosing/understanding the right powersuply for the TS100
« Reply #65 on: April 17, 2018, 07:43:40 pm »
I use an old 24V 6.5A Laptop charger. Works great.

Cable Wise I would highly recommend this cable type, soft as silk and high temperature resistant (does not melt even with the iron all the way up).

https://www.designacable.com/2-core-high-temperature-silicone-rubber-cable-2x0-25mm-4amp-dc-wiring-black-orange-green.html

Note that they also do a 6A 2 x 0.4mm^2 version which is also very flexible and a good diameter match for the high current 5.5x2.5mm jacks. I have 1m lengths of both but prefer the 6A one for the way it flexes more smoothly and balances the iron better (and slightly lower voltage drop). The thinner one is probably better for portable battery use though.

https://www.designacable.com/twin-conductor-silicone-rubber-cable-2x0-4mm-6amp-suitable-for-dc-applications.html

Hi Gyro and everyone else..
So i bought a decent power supply "GST90A24-P1M" €24,20 half the cost of the TS100 but i did not  want to skimp on something i plug in to the mains..

i'm very interested about the power cable you mentioned..
"Twin Core Silicone Rubber Cable. (2x0.4mm Conductor). 6amp. Suitable for DC Applications"

But i have no idea how to proceed?
can i keep the brand new power supply in tact or do i need to cut in to it ??
Is it possible to diy sum sort of flexible heat resistant extension cable for it ?
i would probably get the chicken and the egg problem needing to solder on to a power cable without having a second power source..

i tried searching for "soldering power jack" and "Soldering a DC connector to a cable" but did not find anyone explaining it ...

i think diy the silicone cable you mentioned to something like this.. might be the best solution..? Sort of a flexible soldering extension light and heat proof sounds good to me..

If you don’t want to cut the plug off the power supply or solder anything, you could try the solution I posted already:
https://www.eevblog.com/forum/beginners/choosingunderstanding-the-right-powersuply-for-the-ts100/msg1472255/#msg1472255
 

Offline TuxKey

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Re: choosing/understanding the right powersuply for the TS100
« Reply #66 on: April 17, 2018, 08:02:16 pm »
I use an old 24V 6.5A Laptop charger. Works great.

Cable Wise I would highly recommend this cable type, soft as silk and high temperature resistant (does not melt even with the iron all the way up).

https://www.designacable.com/2-core-high-temperature-silicone-rubber-cable-2x0-25mm-4amp-dc-wiring-black-orange-green.html

Note that they also do a 6A 2 x 0.4mm^2 version which is also very flexible and a good diameter match for the high current 5.5x2.5mm jacks. I have 1m lengths of both but prefer the 6A one for the way it flexes more smoothly and balances the iron better (and slightly lower voltage drop). The thinner one is probably better for portable battery use though.

https://www.designacable.com/twin-conductor-silicone-rubber-cable-2x0-4mm-6amp-suitable-for-dc-applications.html

Hi Gyro and everyone else..
So i bought a decent power supply "GST90A24-P1M" €24,20 half the cost of the TS100 but i did not  want to skimp on something i plug in to the mains..

i'm very interested about the power cable you mentioned..
"Twin Core Silicone Rubber Cable. (2x0.4mm Conductor). 6amp. Suitable for DC Applications"

But i have no idea how to proceed?
can i keep the brand new power supply in tact or do i need to cut in to it ??
Is it possible to diy sum sort of flexible heat resistant extension cable for it ?
i would probably get the chicken and the egg problem needing to solder on to a power cable without having a second power source..

i tried searching for "soldering power jack" and "Soldering a DC connector to a cable" but did not find anyone explaining it ...

i think diy the silicone cable you mentioned to something like this.. might be the best solution..? Sort of a flexible soldering extension light and heat proof sounds good to me..

If you don’t want to cut the plug off the power supply or solder anything, you could try the solution I posted already:
https://www.eevblog.com/forum/beginners/choosingunderstanding-the-right-powersuply-for-the-ts100/msg1472255/#msg1472255

Sorry missed that one..i think i looked over it because i did not understand it..thinking that's for a battery pack has nothing to do with me..hmm sorry again..opening both url's side by side.. it seems that the Amass will fit the 5.5/2.5 jack that comes out of the power supply.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B06ZYVBLN8/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o02_s00?ie=UTF8&p;sc=1

and the Uy Chan connects with the yellow part to that cable and with the jack to my iron am i correct in this ??
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B073BJ3W78/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o04_s01?ie=UTF8&p;sc=1

And i would need to mod that cable right ?? splice or what does one call frankenstein a nice silicone cable in there..
The Uy Chan could be heat resistant good quality but i'm not sure..
 

Offline MacMeter

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Re: choosing/understanding the right powersuply for the TS100
« Reply #67 on: April 17, 2018, 08:21:34 pm »
I use an old 24V 6.5A Laptop charger. Works great.

Cable Wise I would highly recommend this cable type, soft as silk and high temperature resistant (does not melt even with the iron all the way up).

https://www.designacable.com/2-core-high-temperature-silicone-rubber-cable-2x0-25mm-4amp-dc-wiring-black-orange-green.html

Note that they also do a 6A 2 x 0.4mm^2 version which is also very flexible and a good diameter match for the high current 5.5x2.5mm jacks. I have 1m lengths of both but prefer the 6A one for the way it flexes more smoothly and balances the iron better (and slightly lower voltage drop). The thinner one is probably better for portable battery use though.

https://www.designacable.com/twin-conductor-silicone-rubber-cable-2x0-4mm-6amp-suitable-for-dc-applications.html

Hi Gyro and everyone else..
So i bought a decent power supply "GST90A24-P1M" €24,20 half the cost of the TS100 but i did not  want to skimp on something i plug in to the mains..

i'm very interested about the power cable you mentioned..
"Twin Core Silicone Rubber Cable. (2x0.4mm Conductor). 6amp. Suitable for DC Applications"

But i have no idea how to proceed?
can i keep the brand new power supply in tact or do i need to cut in to it ??
Is it possible to diy sum sort of flexible heat resistant extension cable for it ?
i would probably get the chicken and the egg problem needing to solder on to a power cable without having a second power source..

i tried searching for "soldering power jack" and "Soldering a DC connector to a cable" but did not find anyone explaining it ...

i think diy the silicone cable you mentioned to something like this.. might be the best solution..? Sort of a flexible soldering extension light and heat proof sounds good to me..

If you don’t want to cut the plug off the power supply or solder anything, you could try the solution I posted already:
https://www.eevblog.com/forum/beginners/choosingunderstanding-the-right-powersuply-for-the-ts100/msg1472255/#msg1472255

Sorry missed that one..i think i looked over it because i did not understand it..thinking that's for a battery pack has nothing to do with me..hmm sorry again..opening both url's side by side.. it seems that the Amass will fit the 5.5/2.5 jack that comes out of the power supply.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B06ZYVBLN8/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o02_s00?ie=UTF8&p;sc=1

and the Uy Chan connects with the yellow part to that cable and with the jack to my iron am i correct in this ??
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B073BJ3W78/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o04_s01?ie=UTF8&p;sc=1

And i would need to mod that cable right ?? splice or what does one call frankenstein a nice silicone cable in there..
The Uy Chan could be heat resistant good quality but i'm not sure..

Since you bought the exact same power supply I originally recommended and I own, you won’t have to do anything else other then order the battery cable (nice to have if you ever need portability), and the adapter cable. The Uy Chan cable is silicone and soft, only downside is it is a bit SHORT in length, not a problem for me. If you want a longer silicone lead, you will most likely have to make one as Gyro has posted. Good luck.
 

Offline TuxKey

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Re: choosing/understanding the right powersuply for the TS100
« Reply #68 on: April 18, 2018, 05:26:17 am »

Since you bought the exact same power supply I originally recommended and I own, you won’t have to do anything else other then order the battery cable (nice to have if you ever need portability), and the adapter cable. The Uy Chan cable is silicone and soft, only downside is it is a bit SHORT in length, not a problem for me. If you want a longer silicone lead, you will most likely have to make one as Gyro has posted. Good luck.

Thanks for you advice...like you mentioned there was no power cable i opted not to buy one since it looks like a standard computer power cable and i have 3spare cables so one should be good.. if not i can always buy one locally..btw i bought it from TME.eu and they also sell it without power cord.

will add the UY Chan in my next order from banggood
And i found the adapter cable on banggood..might as well grab it from there.. no hurry..(style 2)

https://www.banggood.com/DC-Female-Plug-To-XT60-Female-Plug-Charging-Adapter-Cable-For-ISDT-Charger-p-1154862.html?rmmds=search&ID=510914&cur_warehouse=CN

my power supply and other soldering goodies should arrive today from tme.eu.. very impressed with the fast shipping.
as i bought sum no clean flux TE410/500 and Isopropylalcohol which meant no shipping by plane.. looks like poland to The Netherlands is fast..even by truck or train..
just received a strange mail about the difference in flux but i asked around and no one could tell me anything so i made a new topic hoping it would also benefit others starting off.
 

Offline TuxKey

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Re: choosing/understanding the right powersuply for the TS100
« Reply #69 on: April 27, 2018, 03:00:05 pm »
I just had a back and forth with that YouTube reviewer, and was exactly as I thought. He had a bad tip, didn’t test read it first, and was using a 10 amp PSU, which would still be fine if his tip was not shorted. The kits with the 19v PSU are perhaps their choice to save money and keep the kit costs down, but for me personally, I wanted to get their units rated and advertised 65 watt output, which is only possible with the 24 volt PSU.

So I recommend that TS100 users test read their tips when new, before heating them up. And if you get a TIP WARNING, to immediately disconnect the power. I logged my tips when new:

TS-B2 = 7.1 ohms.
TS-BC2 = 7.1 ohms.
TS-C1 = 8.6 ohms.
TS-K = 8.6 ohms.

So i have my Lidle multimeter and just got my TS100 with two tips..
the TS-B2 and the TS-D24.
i would love to measure the tips.. i assume  i put the meter on 200 ohms?
but can't seem to get a clear reading..
Can you or someone else tel me what i'm doing wrong.?
 

Offline TuxKey

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Re: choosing/understanding the right powersuply for the TS100
« Reply #70 on: April 27, 2018, 08:52:39 pm »
It took me a better half of the day... |O but i think i got..how to measure the tips..
Please tell me it's ok ????
https://imgur.com/a/W7rxiNX
 

Offline Gyro

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Re: choosing/understanding the right powersuply for the TS100
« Reply #71 on: April 28, 2018, 09:02:51 am »
Yes, you've got it.  :)

You might have had some reading stability problems due to contamination of the plating on the new meter probes, there seem to have been a few posts about this on new low cost probes recently. If touching the meter probe tips together (we're done with the TS100 element now) doesn't give you a reasonably consistent zero-ish reading then try cleaning them up by polishing them against some card, maybe some metal polish too. Don't use sandpaper or you'll have to keep sharpening them forever more. Note that when you hold the meter probes together you will always see the meter lead resistance (rather than zero) of maybe 0.1 - 0.4 ohms but with clean probes, the reading should at least be reasonably stable.
Chris

"Victor Meldrew, the Crimson Avenger!"
 

Offline TuxKey

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Re: choosing/understanding the right powersuply for the TS100
« Reply #72 on: April 28, 2018, 11:01:02 am »
thanks,,

the first times..i put one of the probes on the actual tip and near the end of the iron..
as shown here in the pics ..
only when i was frustrated and not knowing what to do.. i played around with the continuity setting of the meter and found that the last two rings were somehow connected..and decided to measure from there...
these probes where recommended to me and i ordered them (should be in by end of next week.)
https://www.ebay.com/itm/171162377470

Also got these.
https://www.ebay.com/itm/Brymen-Slip-on-Crocodile-Alligator-Clips-for-2mm-Probe-Tip-Gold-Spring-Contacts-/171302315753

and these are on my list.
https://www.ebay.com/itm/10cm-Silicone-Test-Leads-with-Sprung-Hooks-and-Female-Banana-Connectors-1-Pair-/201358533333
https://www.ebay.com/itm/One-Pair-of-14-AWG-14-Gauge-Silicone-Wires-Silicon-Cables-1m-Red-1m-Black-/170989738206
https://www.ebay.com/itm/16AWG-50cm-Silicone-Test-Leads-w-43mm-Copper-Crocodile-Clips-1-Pair-Red-Black-/171253604936

i was thinking of buying a resistor don't know if i need something as fancy as this..
https://www.banggood.com/10W-300-Ohm-5-Aluminum-Wire-Wound-Power-Resistor-Metal-Shell-Supply-Inverter-p-1088809.html?rmmds=mywishlist&cur_warehouse=CN
to make a battery tester to use with my multi-meter..did sum reading yesterday and learned that testing batteries should be done under load to get a clear picture of the state..

Thanks for your help appreciate it as always.
 

Offline TuxKey

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Re: choosing/understanding the right powersuply for the TS100
« Reply #73 on: April 30, 2018, 03:02:54 pm »
Hi guys...

so got all my gear in ready to start my diy projects but i’m finding the power supply cable to be a hassle the ferrite core drags down the TS100..


MacMeter recommended this solution..

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B073BJ3W78/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o04_s01?ie=UTF8&p;sc=1

That cable i can find on Banggood..
Only problem is i can’t find this one on banggood..
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B06ZYVBLN8/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o02_s00?ie=UTF8&p;sc=1

So i thought To go with gyro’s recommendation And grab this cable.
https://www.designacable.com/twin-conductor-silicone-rubber-cable-2x0-4mm-6amp-suitable-for-dc-applications.html

i cut a piece of wire 45cm taped it to the power supply jack to get a feel of what 45cm extension would feel like and it seems adequate so i can always shorten it later one.. if so needed.

The reason why i think the second sollution is the better one for me now.. is that i can’t find the correct female 2.5 jack to xt60..

Only problem is that designcable doesn’t seem to sell female 5.5mm/2.5mm DC

btw wanted to ask would this cable be a good choice to solder on Aligator clips ??
https://www.designacable.com/2-core-high-temperature-silicone-rubber-cable-2x0-25mm-4amp-dc-wiring-black-orange-green.html



am i missing something anyone from the UK know designacable.com and if they  sell the male and female 5.5mm/2.5mm DC jacks
that i can solder on the nice twin core silicone rubber cable??
 

Offline xavkno

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Re: choosing/understanding the right powersuply for the TS100
« Reply #74 on: May 10, 2018, 06:01:38 pm »
anyone  have any experience  with this power supply?: https://www.banggood.com/AC-100V-240V-DC-24V-4A-96W-Power-Supply-Charger-Converter-Adapter-p-970663.html?p=2@3021069489201207MV&cur_warehouse=CN

it's a 3 prong one but it's also very cheap
 


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