Author Topic: Difference between 1% and 5% 0 Ω jumper  (Read 676 times)

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Online Max2018

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Difference between 1% and 5% 0 Ω jumper
« on: June 19, 2021, 11:40:09 pm »
Is there any naming convention regarding 0 Ω resistor percentage tolerances?
The only reason I can think of why 1% and 5% 0 Ω exists is marketing so they have that 0 Ohm option in that series.

example:
5% Yageo AF0402JR-070RL
1% Yageo RC0402FR-070RL
 

Offline TimNJ

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Re: Difference between 1% and 5% 0 Ω jumper
« Reply #1 on: June 20, 2021, 01:41:54 am »
Well, "0Ω" resistor will always have some resistance.  If a manufacturer has different process for 1% and 5% resistors, maybe your 0Ω jumpers with 'x' mΩ of resistance will be better controlled on the 1% process compared to 5% process. On the other hand, I feel a generic 1% 0402 and generic 5% 0402 are probably made on the same line, and just binned after the fact.  Can a manufacturer reliably test very low milli-ohms quickly enough? I don't know, I guess so. (Just rambling.)

Some manufacturers specify their 0Ω resistors separately, and may give a nominal jumper resistance. In the case of Yageo, they just give a current limit, which you can back-calculate to guestimate the nominal resistance of the jumper. For RC0402, 1/16W, Yageo says 1A max, so  the jumper resistance is probably in the range of 50mΩ.

Maybe the "1% jumper" and "5% jumper" thing is only an artifact of the distributor listing, where they just apply the tolerance rating of the series to the jumper as well. If you look through manufacturer datasheets, I'm not sure if they actually talk about jumpers in this way.
 

Offline bob91343

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Re: Difference between 1% and 5% 0 Ω jumper
« Reply #2 on: June 20, 2021, 03:25:36 am »
There cannot be a difference between a 1% and 5% zero Ohm resistor.  Even if it were 100% it would still be zero.

It's just a damned jumper and tolerance has no place in its description.  As mentioned above, it could be to round out the table of values.  The proper description would indicate its guaranteed maximum resistance.
 

Offline JustMeHere

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Re: Difference between 1% and 5% 0 Ω jumper
« Reply #3 on: June 20, 2021, 03:50:13 am »
In the datasheet it says:

(for jumper ordering, use code of J)
 

Online magic

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Re: Difference between 1% and 5% 0 Ω jumper
« Reply #4 on: June 20, 2021, 09:27:42 am »
Different series of products, each happens to include a jumper. For exact specs of each jumper, find the series' datasheet.

Quote
Yageo AF Anti-Sulfurated Resistors are halogen free and RoHS compliant. This series is suitable for environments exposed to high levels of contamination, such as industrial control systems.
 

Offline Siwastaja

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Re: Difference between 1% and 5% 0 Ω jumper
« Reply #5 on: June 20, 2021, 09:43:07 am »
Yes, it's because manufacturers don't want to give completely different series numbers and datasheets for those jumpers. So 0 ohm jumpers exist in each series.

Look very carefully in the datasheets and you may (or may not) find some footnote describing a different standard on defining the tolerance on 0 ohm (or other very low!) values. Instead of percentage, it can be an absolute value. If you don't find such a note, then this doesn't mean 1% and 5% 0 ohm jumpers make any sense, it's just that manufacturers didn't spend time documenting their products properly. Properly documented 0 ohm jumper has a minimum and maximum resistance value.
 
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Online HighVoltage

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Re: Difference between 1% and 5% 0 Ω jumper
« Reply #6 on: June 20, 2021, 09:50:47 am »
For practical applications in "normal" electronics for a simple jumper it makes no difference at all !

In Metrology this tolerance makes a big difference for a 0 Ohm resistor.

There are 3 kinds of people in this world, those who can count and those who can not.
 
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