Author Topic: Does one need to know all the different types of meters (past and present)?  (Read 5441 times)

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Offline doctorm

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in the book im reading to learn about electronics as my hobby, im in a frustrating chapter about all the types of meters ever made and how they came to be.

its a real bore, to say the least, but im trying to be a trooper and learn it bc i would figure it may prove useful or somehting later on but the more i read, the more i think not.

so my question is do you really need to know all the types of meters that are out there and how they work and stuff?
 

Online EEVblog

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Are you just talking about multimeters?
If so then there have only been 4 basic types. Analog, VTVM, FET input analog, and today's Digitals.
The first 3 are all the same, they essentially just differ in input impedance.

Dave.
 

Offline doctorm

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no not really the types of multimeters but like it talks about what an ammeter is and how it was made and how it works and stuff and other measuring devices for sound, power, electricity, and such.

 

Offline armandas

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Definitely learn about the voltmeter and ammeter, or you're bound to measure current across a component ;)
 

Offline saturation

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You don't need to know every type of meter, but the ammeter is the father of almost all analog meters.  If you know how that works, its the basis by which every other analog meter is based on: voltmeter, ohmeter, dB meter, etc.,

When you move to digital meters, the digital voltmeter is the father of almost all meters used in all kinds of tools.

You don't have to put a lot of effort into reading about it, it might be better to make your own ammeter so you get a better feel for it so you have fun learning what you find dull by just reading.

If you're new to electronics, the best way to get goobers of things to play with is to buy one of those 300 in one electronic labs.




no not really the types of multimeters but like it talks about what an ammeter is and how it was made and how it works and stuff and other measuring devices for sound, power, electricity, and such.


« Last Edit: July 29, 2010, 11:26:17 am by saturation »
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 Saturation
 

Offline NiHaoMike

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You don't need to know every type of meter, but the ammeter is the father of all analog meters.  If you know how that works, its the basis by which every other analog meter is based on: voltmeter, ohmeter, dB meter, etc.,
What about electrostatic voltmeters used in high voltage work?
Cryptocurrency has taught me to love math and at the same time be baffled by it.

Cryptocurrency lesson 0: Altcoins and Bitcoin are not the same thing.
 

Offline saturation

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You're right..  If its the old style Kelvin meter, it works like a capacitor with a movable plate, with the 'attractive' force balanced by a spring and thus allowing for a readout.  Sorry for the large image, but I think it shows the brass and bluish plate nicely, the balance springs, etc., a very delicate instrument.



This is unlike a galvanometer movement:



But modern ESVM are amplified analog or digital, which then use as a readout an ammeter or the DVM.






You don't need to know every type of meter, but the ammeter is the father of almost all analog meters.  If you know how that works, its the basis by which every other analog meter is based on: voltmeter, ohmeter, dB meter, etc.,
What about electrostatic voltmeters used in high voltage work?
Best Wishes,

 Saturation
 

Offline Mechatrommer

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i love to read about history... about any technology, but not politics ok? i will know how human kind progress, so i can expect how i or current technology progress to the future ;)... i still wonder actually... how the barbage machine works and how he got the idea.
It's extremely difficult to start life.. one features of nature.. physical laws are mathematical theory of great beauty... You may wonder Why? our knowledge shows that nature is so constructed. We simply have to accept it. One could describe the situation by saying that... (Paul Dirac)
 

Offline DJPhil

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i love to read about history... about any technology, but not politics ok? i will know how human kind progress, so i can expect how i or current technology progress to the future ;)... i still wonder actually... how the barbage machine works and how he got the idea.

In my opinion, nothing beats James Burke for technological history. One of his big fans put the four major series that he did on youtube. I listen to these while I work all the time.

Here's the bit on Babbage. Connections 3, Episode 2.

Hope that helps. :)
 

Offline Mechatrommer

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In my opinion, nothing beats James Burke for technological history. One of his big fans put the four major series that he did on youtube. I listen to these while I work all the time.
Here's the bit on Babbage. Connections 3, Episode 2.
Hope that helps. :)

i wish i have the time to sit for just a half an hour more frequently infront of discovery channel tv

It's extremely difficult to start life.. one features of nature.. physical laws are mathematical theory of great beauty... You may wonder Why? our knowledge shows that nature is so constructed. We simply have to accept it. One could describe the situation by saying that... (Paul Dirac)
 

Offline saturation

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Since time is a resource you cannot get back after you use it up, its best to save or use it wisely as much as you can.

For TV, find ways to get rid of the advertising by using a DVR or such or getting the shows as a DVD or bluray, in the USA, ads use 1/3 of every broadcast hour to advertise what you don't want to see.  You can easily get several more hours per night to do something you really want to do.

Most shows today, even rebroadcasted old shows, are shortened, often edited to squeeze less show, and more advertising out of it; a common example is changing the ending and opening credits to save time.  I thus, almost never watch straight TV, but if I like a show, I will find DVR it, or wait for it on disc or watch it through a non-advertising sponsored way.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Television_advertisement#Frequency




In my opinion, nothing beats James Burke for technological history. One of his big fans put the four major series that he did on youtube. I listen to these while I work all the time.
Here's the bit on Babbage. Connections 3, Episode 2.
Hope that helps. :)

i wish i have the time to sit for just a half an hour more frequently infront of discovery channel tv


Best Wishes,

 Saturation
 

Offline qno

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There is also another type where the coil is stationary and iron attached to the needle is moving.
One big advantage of this meter is that it always indicates RMS value AC & DC.
I think it is called iron core movement
 The galvanometer is an DC average meter and has long been a source of errors, measuring AC voltage and power.
Why spend money I don't have on things I don't need to impress people I don't like?
 

alm

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There's also the differential voltmeter, which I believe was the instrument for accurate voltage measurements before the DVM came along.
 


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