Author Topic: converting Volt into dB  (Read 6531 times)

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Offline schmitt trigger

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Re: converting Volt into dB
« Reply #25 on: August 09, 2019, 05:01:41 pm »
Indeed, one can use decibels for many purposes. Many prepostperous.

In my previous job, since it was a public company, the CEO's compensation was available.

As a prank, we started calculating how many decibel dollars (dB$) our pay compared to the CEO's compensation.

Because it was purchasing POWER, it was calculated as: 10log(my$/$CEO$)

Of course, the results were always negative  :-DD
 
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Offline soldar

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Re: converting Volt into dB
« Reply #26 on: August 09, 2019, 10:27:56 pm »
I reiterate that decibels are a measure of power ratio.  Any other use is perversion.

Can we have a cite for that? Because Wikipedia disagrees and cites ISO 80000-3:2006.

Quote
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Decibel
In the International System of Quantities, the decibel is defined as a unit of measurement for quantities of type level or level difference, which are defined as the logarithm of the ratio of power- or field-type quantities.
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Offline Audioguru again

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Re: converting Volt into dB
« Reply #27 on: August 10, 2019, 02:01:47 am »
The voltage gain of opamps is measured in decibels.
The voltage gain of audio power amplifiers is measured in decibels.
The voltage cutoff frequency of a filter is measured at -3dB.
The voltage reduction of a logarithmic volume control is measured in decibels.
 

Offline soldar

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Re: converting Volt into dB
« Reply #28 on: August 10, 2019, 11:34:51 am »
Another cite:

Quote
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gain_(electronics)

The term gain alone is ambiguous, and can refer to the ratio of output to input voltage (voltage gain), current (current gain) or electric power (power gain).[4] In the field of audio and general purpose amplifiers, especially operational amplifiers, the term usually refers to voltage gain,[2] but in radio frequency amplifiers it usually refers to power gain.

Another: http://www.sengpielaudio.com/calculatorVoltagePower.htm
« Last Edit: August 10, 2019, 11:56:33 am by soldar »
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Offline mikerj

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Re: converting Volt into dB
« Reply #29 on: August 10, 2019, 06:37:22 pm »
I reiterate that decibels are a measure of power ratio.  Any other use is perversion.

You can reiterate it as many times as you want, but unless you back it up with some actual evidence then I'm just going to ignore it.
 

Offline magic

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Re: converting Volt into dB
« Reply #30 on: August 10, 2019, 07:21:17 pm »
Quote
In the field of audio and general purpose amplifiers, especially operational amplifiers, the term usually refers to voltage gain,[2] but in radio frequency amplifiers it usually refers to power gain.
Worth noting that when it refers to voltage gain, it's still reported as the equivalent power gain under assumption of equal load impedance. That is, a 10x voltage gain is reported as 20dB because it corresponds to 100x power gain, not as 10dB because it's a 10x gain.
Just Wikipedia being a misleading pile fo turd as usual :--
 

Offline soldar

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Re: converting Volt into dB
« Reply #31 on: August 10, 2019, 07:56:09 pm »
I reiterate that decibels are a measure of power ratio.  Any other use is perversion.

You can reiterate it as many times as you want, but unless you back it up with some actual evidence then I'm just going to ignore it.
You pervert, you!  :)
All my posts are made with 100% recycled electrons and bare traces of grey matter.
 
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