Author Topic: Getting started with 7400/4000-series logic. Which parts to stock?  (Read 8247 times)

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Offline TimNJ

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Hello,

I'm making a pretty big order off of Mouser with some standard parts, both passives, and semiconductors. I've got a whole slew of capacitors and resistors. I also selected a few op amps, comparators, and a few 555s.

I understand 7400/4000 series logic is pretty old at this point, and perhaps not as useful as it used to be, I still want to learn how to use them so that I can understand and build more complex things later, perhaps with CPLDs/FPGAs.

They are not too expensive, usually around $0.50/chip, but there's just so many of them. What would be some good ones to stock up on? Any ideas for an absolute beginner?

Thanks.
 

Offline c4757p

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Re: Getting started with 7400/4000-series logic. Which parts to stock?
« Reply #1 on: May 28, 2013, 11:39:42 pm »
Just don't get plain old 7400 series ones.

Do these even still exist?  :o
No longer active here - try the IRC channel if you just can't be without me :)
 

Offline TimNJ

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Re: Getting started with 7400/4000-series logic. Which parts to stock?
« Reply #2 on: May 28, 2013, 11:46:05 pm »
I was going to buy 74hc. How many do you think I should buy of each if I'm just learning?

Thanks!
 

Offline Paul Price

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Re: Getting started with 7400/4000-series logic. Which parts to stock?
« Reply #3 on: May 28, 2013, 11:48:45 pm »
I just pulled a whole mess of them out of my first computer, which was just a motherboard I bought as a kit.
This old Apple 1 motherboard was getting to be not some much fun to play with.  I got tired of not being able to play anything but tic-tac-toe on that same little monochrome monitor and goofy keyboard that it didn't even come with and decided to gut this old piece of junk, so I ripped out all of them, got a whole bunch of nice 74LSxxx and a few CMOS chips out of this board and tossed this thing out.
« Last Edit: May 29, 2013, 12:56:29 am by Paul Price »
 

Offline TerminalJack505

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Re: Getting started with 7400/4000-series logic. Which parts to stock?
« Reply #4 on: May 28, 2013, 11:51:18 pm »
If you have a 2nd edition of Practical Electronics for Inventors, there is a "Decent Stockpile of Electrical Components" list on pages 891 and 892.  The author lists a bunch of 74xx and 4000-series parts that he recommends to have on-hand.

If you don't have the book, let me know and I'll copy the list and post it.
 

Offline TimNJ

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Re: Getting started with 7400/4000-series logic. Which parts to stock?
« Reply #5 on: May 28, 2013, 11:57:38 pm »
One of my classmates has it. I've read through it, wonderful book, but I don't actually own it.

It would be awesome if you could share. Thanks.
 

Offline TerminalJack505

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Re: Getting started with 7400/4000-series logic. Which parts to stock?
« Reply #6 on: May 29, 2013, 12:52:40 am »
Here's what's on his list for 74xx-series parts:


74x00 Quad 2-input NAND
74x02 Quad 2-input NOR
74x04 Hex inverter
74x08 Quad 2-input AND
74x10 Triple 3-input NAND
74x11 Triple 3-input AND
74x14 Hex inverter Schmitt trigger
74x16 Hex inverter buffer/driver (open collector)
74x20 Dual 4-input NAND
74x30 8-input NAND
74x32 Quad 2-input OR
74x38 Quad 2-input NAND buffer (O.C.)
74x47 BCD-to-7 seg. decoder/driver
74x70 Edge-triggered JK flip-flop
74x74 Dual D flip-flop
74x85 4-bit magnitude comparator
74x95 4-bit parallel shift register
74x107 Dual JK flip-flop w/ clear
74x123 Monostable multivibrator
74x132 Quad 2-input NAND Scmitt trigger
74x138 3-to-8 decoder/demultiplexer
74x151 8-input multiplexer
74x153 Dual 4/1 data selector/multiplexer
74x154 4/16 line decoder
74x157 Quad 2/1 data selector
74x164 8-bit serial shift register
74x174 Hex D-type flip-flop w/ clear
74x193 Binary up/down counter w/ clear
74x240 Octal invert. line driver tri-state
74x244 Octal driver tri-state
74x245 Octal bus transceiver tri-state
74x273 Octal D-type flip-flop with clear
74x279 Quad set-reset latch
74x373 Octal D flip-flop tri-state
74x374 Octal D f.f. edge-triggered tri-state


And here's his list for 4000-series parts:


4001 Quad 2-input NOR gate
4011 Quad 2-input NAND gate
4013 Dual D flip-flop with set/reset
4015 Dual 4-stage static shift register
4016 Quad bilateral switch
4017 Decade counter/divider
4020 14-stage binary ripple counter
4023 Triple 3-input NAND gate
4024 7-stage binary counter
4027 Dual JK master-slave flip-flop
4040 12-stage binary ripple counter
4046 Micropower phase-locked loop
4049 Hex buffer/converter (inverting)
4050 Hex buffer/converter (non-inverting)
4051 Single 8-chan. multiplexer/demultiplexer
4066 Quad bilateral switch
4069 Hex inverter
4070 Quad Exclusive-OR gate
4071 Binary up/down counter w/ clear
4081 Quad 2-input AND gate
4093 Quad 2-input NAND Schmitt trigger
4511 BCD to 7-seg. latch/decoder/driver
4538 Dual monostable multivibrator
4543 BCD to 7-segment decoder
4584 Hex Schmitt trigger
 

Offline TimNJ

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Re: Getting started with 7400/4000-series logic. Which parts to stock?
« Reply #7 on: May 29, 2013, 01:44:49 am »
Wow that's a lot of parts! I'll have to see if I can filter through those at all, though I think I'll just focus mainly on the basic gates and inverters and stuff. But thanks for all of the advice. I'll definitely use it.
 

Offline Paul Moir

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Re: Getting started with 7400/4000-series logic. Which parts to stock?
« Reply #8 on: May 29, 2013, 02:09:21 am »
General random personal comments on the above list:

74x00 Quad 2-input NAND
74x02 Quad 2-input NOR
74x04 Hex inverter
74x08 Quad 2-input AND
74x10 Triple 3-input NAND
74x11 Triple 3-input AND
74x14 Hex inverter Schmitt trigger   All check.  '07 or '06 are handy for open collector outputs.  Pick one.

74x16 Hex inverter buffer/driver (open collector)  Never used it personally
74x20 Dual 4-input NAND  Sorta Check
74x30 8-input NAND  Sorta Check
74x32 Quad 2-input OR  Check
74x38 Quad 2-input NAND buffer (O.C.)  Never used it
74x47 BCD-to-7 seg. decoder/driver  OK if your into driving 7 seg LED displays...
74x70 Edge-triggered JK flip-flop Never used it
74x74 Dual D flip-flop  Classic
74x85 4-bit magnitude comparator  Never used it
74x95 4-bit parallel shift register Never used it
74x107 Dual JK flip-flop w/ clear  Handy
74x123 Monostable multivibrator  Neat chip
74x132 Quad 2-input NAND Scmitt trigger Have used rarely.
74x138 3-to-8 decoder/demultiplexer Use regularly.  Handy.
74x151 8-input multiplexer Never used once.
74x153 Dual 4/1 data selector/multiplexer Never used once.
74x154 4/16 line decoder  Used, but in awkward large package.  Two '138s are often better, and their multiple chip selects make it easy.
74x157 Quad 2/1 data selector Never used
74x164 8-bit serial shift register  Neat chip.  EDIT: '299 is sort of the opposite for serial->parallel tasks.
74x174 Hex D-type flip-flop w/ clear Classic.  But a pair of '74s do in a pinch.
74x193 Binary up/down counter w/ clear Classic.  That's the counter you want.
74x240 Octal invert. line driver tri-state Not much use.  Awkward pinout.
74x244 Octal driver tri-state  Not much use, awkward pinout (get '245s instead.  Not awkward and bidirectional if you need it).  Like the '240 somewhat old school.
74x245 Octal bus transceiver tri-state  If you are into buses this is one handy chip.  Good logical pinout.
74x273 Octal D-type flip-flop with clear Never used. 
74x279 Quad set-reset latch Never used.
74x373 Octal D flip-flop tri-state  Used, but get '573 instead for better pinout.
74x374 Octal D f.f. edge-triggered tri-state Used, but get '574 instead for better pinout.


CMOS - I haven't done nearly as much CMOS:

4001 Quad 2-input NOR gate
4011 Quad 2-input NAND gate
4013 Dual D flip-flop with set/reset  All classic must haves.

4015 Dual 4-stage static shift register  Never used it.
4016 Quad bilateral switch  I think I used it once.  4066 much more.
4017 Decade counter/divider  Fun.
4020 14-stage binary ripple counter  Pretty fun.
4023 Triple 3-input NAND gate  Never used it
4024 7-stage binary counter  Didn't use it.
4027 Dual JK master-slave flip-flop  Didn't use it
4040 12-stage binary ripple counter  Fun too.
4046 Micropower phase-locked loop  Amazingly cool but sometimes frustrating chip.  Must have a couple.  PLL learning tool!
4049 Hex buffer/converter (inverting) Classic
4050 Hex buffer/converter (non-inverting) Never used.
4051 Single 8-chan. multiplexer/demultiplexer Classic.
4066 Quad bilateral switch Classic.
4069 Hex inverter Classic.
4070 Quad Exclusive-OR gate Didn't use.
4071 Binary up/down counter w/ clear Didn't use.
4081 Quad 2-input AND gate Have used sometimes.
4093 Quad 2-input NAND Schmitt trigger Have used.
4511 BCD to 7-seg. latch/decoder/driver Seen used?
4538 Dual monostable multivibrator  Not familiar at all.
4543 BCD to 7-segment decoder  Are you planning on driving 7 segment LED displays?
4584 Hex Schmitt trigger Haven't used.
« Last Edit: May 29, 2013, 02:26:39 am by Paul Moir »
 

Offline edpalmer42

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Re: Getting started with 7400/4000-series logic. Which parts to stock?
« Reply #9 on: May 29, 2013, 02:15:10 am »
You might want to look at getting at least a few 74AC series parts - at least the 74AC04 hex inverter.  They have the ability to directly drive a standard 50 ohm load.  Very nice if you want to interface something to a 50 ohm device.

Ed
 

Offline TerminalJack505

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Re: Getting started with 7400/4000-series logic. Which parts to stock?
« Reply #10 on: May 29, 2013, 02:21:07 am »
Wow that's a lot of parts! I'll have to see if I can filter through those at all, though I think I'll just focus mainly on the basic gates and inverters and stuff. But thanks for all of the advice. I'll definitely use it.

That's probably a good idea.  I think that you will find that--no matter how many different parts you have on-hand--you will never have all of the parts you need.  That's how it works for me, anyway.
 

Offline mimmus78

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Re: Getting started with 7400/4000-series logic. Which parts to stock?
« Reply #11 on: May 29, 2013, 10:15:12 pm »
I just pulled a whole mess of them out of my first computer, which was just a motherboard I bought as a kit.
This old Apple 1 motherboard was getting to be not some much fun to play with.  I got tired of not being able to play anything but tic-tac-toe on that same little monochrome monitor and goofy keyboard that it didn't even come with and decided to gut this old piece of junk, so I ripped out all of them, got a whole bunch of nice 74LSxxx and a few CMOS chips out of this board and tossed this thing out.

Hope it was not one of those first model as of 2012, apx. 40-50 Apple I computers are documented to exist (plus an indefinite number of possible unreported cases), making it a very rare collector's item.
On May 25, 2013, a functioning 1976 model was sold for a record €516,000 (US$668,000) in Cologne.[22] Auction Team Breker said an Asian client bought the Apple 1, which Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak built in a family garage. Breker says it is one of only six known remaining functioning models in the world. This particular unit has Wozniak's signature. An old business transaction letter from Jobs also was included, as well as the original owner's manual.
FROM WIKIPEDIA
 

Offline rolycat

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Re: Getting started with 7400/4000-series logic. Which parts to stock?
« Reply #12 on: May 29, 2013, 10:51:22 pm »
Just don't get plain old 7400 series ones.

Do these even still exist?  :o

At least one does...

The 7407 hex buffer is still widely available since it has open collector outputs which can go up to 30 V.

Farnell still have some other vanilla 7400 series chips, such as the 7400 itself, the 7404, and a few others.
 

Offline johnboxall

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Re: Getting started with 7400/4000-series logic. Which parts to stock?
« Reply #13 on: May 30, 2013, 01:14:49 am »
I just pulled a whole mess of them out of my first computer, which was just a motherboard I bought as a kit.
This old Apple 1 motherboard was getting to be not some much fun to play with.  I got tired of not being able to play anything but tic-tac-toe on that same little monochrome monitor and goofy keyboard that it didn't even come with and decided to gut this old piece of junk, so I ripped out all of them, got a whole bunch of nice 74LSxxx and a few CMOS chips out of this board and tossed this thing out.

Nice one.
 


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