Author Topic: Has anyone ever seen this construction technique before?  (Read 12857 times)

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Offline bibz

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Re: Has anyone ever seen this construction technique before?
« Reply #50 on: March 04, 2017, 01:17:24 pm »
OK if there's some other guitar amp fans here lets get to brass tacks. The amp that made me fall in love with the construction was the Hiwatt DR-103

http://cdn.tonegeek.com/wp-content/uploads/DSC_1484.jpg

Said to be tough enough to drop out of a helicopter and still run. While I doubt that (especially if the valves were in it!) it's an absolute MONSTER of an amp. Cranked to 10's it shook the hell out of my entire house and pissed off more neighbours then I realised I had  :-DD

But my favourite looking amp (guts) is my unicorn. An original Matamp. These were green amps related to the Orange amps being made down south of England, but for the northern market. As a Matt who has a totally northern english ancestry (even though, straya!) I've always wanted one.

Then I seen the inside...

http://www.chambonino.com/work/matamp/mat1.html

MMMM MMMMMMMMMMMMM.
 

Offline Sredni

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Re: Has anyone ever seen this construction technique before?
« Reply #51 on: March 04, 2017, 01:45:51 pm »
Anybody has spotted the power source [of that beautiful clock]?
I'm asking because I haven't seen any pictures with the clock working.

(Nevertheless it's beautiful)

EDIT
Never mind, "The unit is powered by an external 12VDC adaptor, connected on the back of the frame."
Still, always off.
« Last Edit: March 04, 2017, 01:48:54 pm by Sredni »
All instruments lie. Usually on the bench.
 

Offline Housedad

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Re: Has anyone ever seen this construction technique before?
« Reply #52 on: March 04, 2017, 01:58:55 pm »
yes, but did you see the one pic that had the reed  switch?   I bet that is a latched on/off point to just wave a magnet over it.
At least I'm still older than my test equipment
 

Online Cubdriver

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Re: Has anyone ever seen this construction technique before?
« Reply #53 on: March 04, 2017, 03:58:30 pm »
yes, but did you see the one pic that had the reed  switch?   I bet that is a latched on/off point to just wave a magnet over it.

I though I read somewhere that those were to set it.

-Pat
If it jams, force it.  If it breaks, you needed a new one anyway...
 

Offline Prehistoricman

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Re: Has anyone ever seen this construction technique before?
« Reply #54 on: March 05, 2017, 04:50:02 am »
I was once laying out a board for a little guitar pedal project I thought I'd like to try. About 5 resistors in I thought (stupidly) "there must be a easier way than this!"

And now I never want to do anything it like it ever again.

Online TimFox

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Re: Has anyone ever seen this construction technique before?
« Reply #55 on: March 07, 2017, 08:42:39 pm »
Yes, that clock is truly a work of art (and a FUNCTIONAL piece as well).

There are even vendors of special little boards that make it easy to use DIP and SO integrated packages in "Manhattan style" board construction:

http://www.qrpme.com/?p=product&id=MEP


I bought a few of these pads from "qrpme" and they look very nice.  Decades ago, I used a similar line of products from Christiansen Brothers (if I remember correctly) that featured pressure-sensitive adhesive backs.  Can you recommend a good adhesive for the qrpme products that is non-messy?  I would prefer not to use CA superglue.
 

Offline PointyOintment

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Re: Has anyone ever seen this construction technique before?
« Reply #56 on: March 11, 2017, 04:14:50 am »
I bought a few of these pads from "qrpme" and they look very nice.  Decades ago, I used a similar line of products from Christiansen Brothers (if I remember correctly) that featured pressure-sensitive adhesive backs.  Can you recommend a good adhesive for the qrpme products that is non-messy?  I would prefer not to use CA superglue.

Double-sided tape?

Offline mtdoc

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Re: Has anyone ever seen this construction technique before?
« Reply #57 on: March 11, 2017, 04:52:31 am »
This guy uses gel super glue. His stuff is a work of art:

 

Offline Cliff Matthews

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Re: Has anyone ever seen this construction technique before?
« Reply #58 on: March 11, 2017, 01:35:11 pm »
@MTDOC - Sweet.. I like how the whole enclosure is PCB.
 

Offline Seekonk

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Re: Has anyone ever seen this construction technique before?
« Reply #59 on: March 11, 2017, 02:21:11 pm »
Wish I could find a picture of it.  In the 60's I believe they were making small cube modules with a circuit board on the top and bottom. Components were installed axially.  Never could figure out how you could get the leads of 15 components to line up with the board holes.  Leads must have had all different lengths  cut so they could be installed in order.  And the boards had to be laid out manually, no CAD at that time.
 

Offline David Hess

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Re: Has anyone ever seen this construction technique before?
« Reply #60 on: March 11, 2017, 02:37:41 pm »
@MTDOC - Sweet.. I like how the whole enclosure is PCB.

I learned the hard way to make doubled sided copper clad enclosures inset on the edges for much greater mechanical strength.  As an added bonus, the extensions along the edges protect anything mounted to the surface like the piston trimmers in my example from impact.
 

Online tooki

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Re: Has anyone ever seen this construction technique before?
« Reply #61 on: March 11, 2017, 04:52:18 pm »
Wish I could find a picture of it.  In the 60's I believe they were making small cube modules with a circuit board on the top and bottom. Components were installed axially.  Never could figure out how you could get the leads of 15 components to line up with the board holes.  Leads must have had all different lengths  cut so they could be installed in order.  And the boards had to be laid out manually, no CAD at that time.
You mean cordwood construction? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Printed_circuit_board#Cordwood_construction

Also look on YouTube for Project Tinkertoy.
 


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