Author Topic: Help With PCB Design  (Read 2092 times)

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Offline zhodg77

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Help With PCB Design
« on: February 05, 2017, 07:21:33 am »
Hello,

New to PCB design and manufacture. I am a hobbyist I make replica race car steering wheels and would like to have a custom PCB to mount hardware to.

I will be using a seperate controller board so all the custom PCB needs to be is just a breakout board from the controller. The controller board is a Leo Bodnar BU0836A-NC 12-Bit board.
http://www.leobodnar.com/shop/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=94&products_id=219

Basically I just want to recreate this board made by Cube Controls, but to my own shape.



These are my renderings of the steering wheels that I make.



This is the shape that I would like the board to be. The Cube Controls breakout board has a IC, possibly for the extra bits that are on there I'm not sure why exactly. But all I am looking for on this board is to be a breakout board with surface mount momentary pushbuttons, pins to mount 3 rotary encoders and pins for two shifter paddles that use a regular momentary switch.


The outline of the board is just a really quick snapshot of the shape, I can get a more accurate file of it in .dxf

I'm looking for advice or help on how I can get it designed to get the gerber files to have one of the custom PCB shops make them. It'll be pretty low volume probably starting out with a run of 10 boards.

I've watched a number of EEVblog's on this topic, but still don't have a concrete direction with help on how to get it designed.

I'm not an EE and don't know how to use PCB design software, I could learn it, but for the sake of time/cost opportunity I feel it may be more optimal to just hire it out.

Thank you!

Zach
 

Offline Milentije

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Re: Help With PCB Design
« Reply #1 on: February 05, 2017, 10:24:12 am »
It's not that trivial like it looks. First, you will need 3D model of the case (SolidWorks?). After the 3D model of the case is made you can import it in to the PCB design software (Altium or its free version, I can't remember how it is called. Ofcourse you can use other software taht allows you importing of 3D models.). Based on the 3D model you will be able to define PCB shape with correct hole sizes and positions.

If you have technical drawing of the PCB shape that fits in the case you want to use, you can use it to shape the PCB.

Using 3D model of the case has its advantages, you can see if everything will fit into the case when it is closed.
 

Offline zhodg77

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Re: Help With PCB Design
« Reply #2 on: February 06, 2017, 04:22:51 am »
Thanks Milentije,

I have the model fully finished and the renderings I posted are from Fusion 360. I can get a .dxf file of the shape of the PCB that I want, it's just I want the boards to be professionally designed and manufactured. I suppose I could get a rough drawing of the PCB in gerber files and send it to a custom PCB shop and ask if they can touch it up.
 

Offline Ice-Tea

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Re: Help With PCB Design
« Reply #3 on: February 06, 2017, 07:55:32 am »
And the controller board will be in the same enclosure? How will they be connected? Have you chosen button type/part #? Rotary part #?

Also: don't put your solder iron @450°C. It hurts my eyes  ;D
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Offline JoeN

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Re: Help With PCB Design
« Reply #4 on: February 06, 2017, 09:17:50 am »
And the controller board will be in the same enclosure? How will they be connected? Have you chosen button type/part #? Rotary part #?

Also: don't put your solder iron @450°C. It hurts my eyes  ;D

My Hakko is on 420°C.  I haven't fried anything yet, but I don't dwell on parts very long at all.  Don't have to.  Is that considered high?
Have You Been Triggered Today?
 

Offline Ice-Tea

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Re: Help With PCB Design
« Reply #5 on: February 06, 2017, 09:40:37 am »
In my book: yes. 300 or so is enough for SMD, 350-370 will do fine for TH as well(and, in all honnesty, is what I use for SMD as well), anything above 400 is too high for my taste.
eBay shop with all the gear you need!
FS: Agilent 54825A, R&S CMU200, CRTU, SMIQ06L, Marconi 6201B, Lecroy WP 950, 9354TM, 9354M, 9374L LC584A, Tek THS720P, TDS7154B, Anritsu MG3671A 2.75G I/Q RF gen, Keithley 238 SMU, HP 8642B, 8903A, 8110A, 8156A
 

Offline Wilksey

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Re: Help With PCB Design
« Reply #6 on: February 06, 2017, 12:00:22 pm »
I use 360 deg C
 

Online T3sl4co1l

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Re: Help With PCB Design
« Reply #7 on: February 06, 2017, 01:14:58 pm »
The DXF file is fine for import into most software (maybe not Eagle? Idunno).  That just leaves everything else!  What's the circuit going to be?

If you wish to copy the existing board's circuit, there are quite many things to cover in order to do that!  (Not the least of which is if the manufacturer would appreciate your copying their design, which they probably wouldn't...)

Re: soldering iron: over 375C and the rosin burns very quickly and the tip oxidizes.  I sometimes turn my Hakko up to 450C just to heat heavy, stubborn joints, but I almost always leave it at 350C for SMT and TH work.

Tim
Seven Transistor Labs, LLC
Electronic design, from concept to prototype.
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