Electronics > Beginners

How are therese conical pointy soldering iron tips supposed to be actually used?

(1/5) > >>

AndrejaKo:
So I've been soldering for a while now and don't really consider myself a beginner, but there's one aspect of soldering irons/stations which I do not really understand, and those are the sharp small conical tips.

For example, I'm currently mostly using a Pace ADS200 station, and I'm mostly using various types of chisel tips, however, for very small tip sizes, the only option seem to be conical tips. For example, here's a 0.2 mm tip that I have:
https://paceworldwide.com/1128-conical-020mm#overview

However, I with conical tips, I always have the issue, that when they start out, they're OK:

However, when I wet them with solder, the solder moves away from the tip a bit upwards, and then creates a ball, like here:

After that, the tip of the iron is mostly dry. Therefore, when I try to initially make contact with a pin, heat isn't being transferred quickly, and when I try to add external solder, it also tends to first make a contact with the ball of solder and not flow down the tip towards the pin I'm trying to solder. The wider part of the tip is probably hotter than the narrower end of the tip, which would then make the solder flow there.
So are there conical tips, which tend to come with irons by default, all just bad design which doesn't want to die, or am I missing something?

Also, I used the 0.2 mm tip in this example, but in my experience, larger tip tend to have same issues.

joeqsmith:
Several years ago I switched from a water sponge to brass shavings.  I also use Pace's "Tip Brite".   I normally solder at 340 and limit it to about 370.  If I need more heat, I add it with a heat gun or torch. 

Even with that, I still run into the problem you describe.  However, it doesn't seem to cause me problems when soldering as I am still able to heat the joint.  Shown are some of my conical fine tips (maybe 20 years old now?).   

Here is an example of me using a fine conical to do some surface mount soldering under some poor conditions.

shapirus:
I have the same issue with them.


--- Quote from: AndrejaKo on May 22, 2024, 02:46:53 pm ---However, when I wet them with solder, the solder moves away from the tip a bit upwards, and then creates a ball, like here:

--- End quote ---
I think that's actually their advantage in some cases such as soldering fine pin pitch ICs: since such a tip tends to remove excess solder from the soldering area, there is less chance of creating bridges.

It looks like they aren't supposed to be used with pre-wetting them with solder, but rather with applying solder to the joint when the tip is already placed at the joint and heating the pins/pads up.

JohanH:

--- Quote from: shapirus on May 22, 2024, 03:30:30 pm ---
It looks like they aren't supposed to be used with pre-wetting them with solder, but rather with applying solder to the joint when the tip is already placed at the joint and heating the pins/pads up.

--- End quote ---

This. Add flux to the board, use a clean tip, heat the joint and feed a tiny amount of solder to the joint. I know there are multiple ways, but check out Mr SolderFix videos on youtube.

The really tiny tips should only be used in tight spaces. The larger the tip you can use, the better and easier.

The small, similar C245 clone tips that I have, don't behave in the way shown in the pictures. The solder sticks only to the outermost end of the tip, so they can't even carry blobs like that.

mikerj:
The best way I've found of using them is to remove them and carefully place them in a dustbin.  They just don't have sufficient contact area to transfer the heat.

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

There was an error while thanking
Thanking...
Go to full version
Powered by SMFPacks Advanced Attachments Uploader Mod