Author Topic: lab equipment  (Read 18128 times)

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Offline eevblogfan

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lab equipment
« on: April 23, 2012, 07:00:06 pm »
hey  all

I am working on new budget, I assume it will be 950$ or so ,

what lab equipment should I buy ?

I thought to buy 50MHz rigol DS1052E

and some used synthesizer and counter ,

but really , what is the most needed gear  ?

is it oscilloscope ?

counter/timer ?

function gen ?

decent modular power supply (I am working on it therefore I am not rushing to buy one .. )

some accessories ? (banana plugs, (capacitor/resistor/inductor )kit , screwdriver set , tweezers set ,hakko soldering station ? ) ??

I have soldering iron , few basic tools , 4X12Ah 12V lead acid batteries , and some confused mind (I am learning in school at the same time I am learning electronics , so please understand my busy brain ><"

I basically have 3 great meters so no need on that regard ... 

thank you  in advance ! :)
 

Offline Spawn

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Re: lab equipment
« Reply #1 on: April 23, 2012, 08:50:07 pm »
Hmmm, this question is asked lot lately while there is a nice video about it, so did you check Dave’s video?
Or even the topic about it with a lot suggestions?
https://www.eevblog.com/forum/blog-specific/eevblog-168-how-to-set-up-an-electronics-lab/msg43428/

Offline w2aew

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Re: lab equipment
« Reply #2 on: April 23, 2012, 11:46:49 pm »
Definitely check out Dave's video.  A lot of it will depend on what you intend to do.  For most homebrew electronics work, I find that the most essential items are: a DMM or two, one or more adjustable power supplies, signal/function generator, and a scope.  Lots of test leads, clips, adapters, probes.
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Offline nick.sek

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Re: lab equipment
« Reply #3 on: April 24, 2012, 01:35:25 am »
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8C21D493B9956538&feature=mh_lolz

Its not as awesome as Dave's but this is my attempt at trying to show people how to develop their own lab. Maybe my inexperience in comparison to Dave's might make it more relate-able. But check out. I go over some of the really important tools and include links in the description for cheapest prices.
 

Offline eevblogfan

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Re: lab equipment
« Reply #4 on: April 24, 2012, 06:17:05 pm »
hey

thank you for the replays

I know Dave's videos (I watch them  all  ::) )

what I asked is " what equipment would you buy within 950$ budget "

and I am having a bad time determining what gear should I buy , either oscilloscope , HP-E3615A or any other "hi end" stuff ,  :P

I have already "goot" gun shaped soldering iron (with boost from 20W to 200W )
and I don't really need soldering station ( for now on anyhow )

as I said , I have 3 good multimeters and other basic equipment .  ;D

I recently ordered Ucurrent adapter (I might find it helpful ) but I really buy it for more advance stuff in the future ,  (I had to buy it now because Dave said he will not produce more )  :-\


thank you in advance !   ;)
 

Offline T4P

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Re: lab equipment
« Reply #5 on: April 24, 2012, 07:01:05 pm »
Eh ... you really need a soldering station , the need is undebated , if you want to do anything anywhere serious anyway .
Not just that Goot TQ-77 that i have also , i don't see how anyone can do electronics with it , it's just huge , unwieldy and just hard to stabilize .
 

Offline robrenz

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Re: lab equipment
« Reply #6 on: April 24, 2012, 07:22:53 pm »
You need to explain the type of projects you intend to work on. With a limited budget you need to be realistic and targeted.

Offline eevblogfan

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Re: lab equipment
« Reply #7 on: April 24, 2012, 07:54:42 pm »
hey

thank you !

basically I am setting my lab now , so I will not "save" any money for projects ,

I would be an EE in the future , hence I'd like to experience with anything I'll be able to , I assume I'll ask here for decent projects etc .

as for beginning project , I'd like to build my own power supply (0-15V@0-5A )  I know it's hard thing to do , but I don't tend to give up (it's maybe not that realistic as I recall , but for my eyes in my age , I'll do it ! :P )

as for my soldering iron , nope , I have done few smd soldering (just for practice and also some fun :)   ) piece of cake ! ,

I think that oscilloscope is super essential , assuming I both one. (400$ ) , I'll have 550$ spare , should I look for function gen ? , counter/timer ? ,or other gear ?

thank you in advance !
 

Offline pickle9000

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Re: lab equipment
« Reply #8 on: April 24, 2012, 08:18:59 pm »
You gotta have minimum test gear

Scope (digital if you can afford it) (500 bucks)
Multimeter (100 bucks)
Variable power supply (linear not switching) (100 buck chinese one to start)
Signal generator (should go up to 5 mhz) (100 bucks chinese)

You need to build things so

Soldering station
Buy the best solder and solder wick (Kester solder or Multicore brand is a must)
Solderless breadboards and jumper wires
Buy a kit or two (a power supply is a good choice) Kits are a great place to start.

Dumpster dive.

If an item is working great, a radio is great fun if you have a scope. If an item is damaged strip it or try and fix it. Remember when you start out rely on your nose and eyes. If a part is burnt its dead. Now try and identify it and just replace it. Sure it may burn up again but you will have improved your soldering skills. If it lives then sell it or donate to charity. Stay away from high voltages, no playing with microwaves or old TV's

Buy a hot air station. This is great for removing parts.

Parts, buy from places like digikey, make sure you spend 50 bucks (100 is better). Buy resistor assortments, cap assortments and lots of small baggies to put them in. Make sure they are labeled. Even today if I need just a single 5 buck item from digikey I always make the order run the order up to 50. In no time you will have a great selection of stuff. Ebay is good for jumpers, smd assortments and cheap test gear, for IC's and such it is normally better to buy from a place like digikey, farnell and such .

Don't mix salvaged parts with new ones.

You need a place to set up and a computer nearby to help.

It's a great hobby, or profession. I myself started with complete crap, but you learn more that way and that is what this is all about. Yes it's true that you need special equipment for special jobs but you will need the basic test gear regardless. Then when you need to do something specific you will either make or buy the test equipment for that particular project.

Have fun

...mike



 

Offline pickle9000

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Re: lab equipment
« Reply #9 on: April 24, 2012, 08:48:27 pm »
Frequency counter, a cheap bench model 100 bucks, add a rubidium standard for accuracy. A digital scope will give you frequency but it won't be very accurate on a low end scope.

Search ebay for "frequency counter VC3165"

I have one I picked up a couple years ago, it was ok but not great, I have a rubidium standard on it now and it's excellent with that.

I do actually use it when doing rf stuff.

...mike
 

Offline Chet T16

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Re: lab equipment
« Reply #10 on: April 24, 2012, 09:04:13 pm »

I have a rubidium standard on it now and it's excellent with that.


Easily done?
Chet
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Re: lab equipment
« Reply #11 on: April 24, 2012, 09:17:40 pm »
Adding an external frequency standard is usually fairly easy if the counter has an external reference input. Especially if the frequency of the standard (often 10 MHz) and the frequency the counter expects match.

I wouldn't place a frequency counter, let alone an accurate reference, high on the list however. It depends on your type of projects, but a fairly small number of applications require accuracy and precision beyond the capabilities of the hardware counters built into scopes. Timing tolerances for RS-232 are something like 1%, for example.
 

Offline Chet T16

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Re: lab equipment
« Reply #12 on: April 24, 2012, 09:34:51 pm »
Adding an external frequency standard is usually fairly easy if the counter has an external reference input. Especially if the frequency of the standard (often 10 MHz) and the frequency the counter expects match.


The one suggested doesn't (or so it seems), thats why i was asking
Chet
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Online EEVblog

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Re: lab equipment
« Reply #13 on: April 24, 2012, 10:53:18 pm »
I wouldn't place a frequency counter, let alone an accurate reference, high on the list however.

Correct, most people will not need one, especially starting out.

pickle9000 has the best list, just the basic test and soldering gear, and spend the rest on parts, kits, hand tools, jumper leads, breadboard, veroboard etc.

Dave.
 

Offline pickle9000

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Re: lab equipment
« Reply #14 on: April 25, 2012, 05:30:23 am »
I agree, a counter is slightly specialized and not really needed. Having said that if you got a hundred bucks to blow and you are interested in RF and stuff of that nature money well spent. Don't buy a portable one they are close to useless.

Having 2 power supplies is a better choice. If you had another 500 bucks get another power supply, spare multimeter. and more of whatever strikes your fancy (frequency counter included). I wonder if Dave has ever counted the number of meters he has?

Then try something fun like the duinomite mini from olimex. Cheap, has BASIC on board and it's PIC based. I've used a couple of them to make simulators (test jigs) and they work great (fastest sims ever actually). You probably won't even need to solder.

Have fun.

...mike
 

Offline casinada

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Re: lab equipment
« Reply #15 on: April 25, 2012, 07:39:23 am »
Don't forget cables, they are not free and very important too. :D
 

Offline eevblogfan

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Re: lab equipment
« Reply #16 on: April 25, 2012, 09:07:41 am »
hey !

assuming I'll buy this : http://www.ebay.com/itm/Rigol-Oscilloscope-50MHz-DS1052E-1G-SG-1M-USA-warranty-/290423301829?pt=BI_Oscilloscopes&hash=item439e93e6c5#ht_7138wt_1046

I will remain 550$ spare , 

should I buy this : http://www.ebay.com/itm/BK-Precision-4017A-10-MHz-Sweep-Function-Generator-/350559771841?pt=BI_Signal_Sources&hash=item519efd9cc1#ht_868wt_1029

and this : http://www.ebay.com/itm/Agilent-E3610A-Power-Supply-Dual-Range-/270768755476?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item3f0b135314#ht_857wt_1029

and basically I'll remain with 50$ .... (assuming I'll buy the E3610A for 200$ )

oh and you might wonder where 64$ are gone ? , umm for the rigol I'll have to pay 16% tax (or even more sometimes ... )

and here is the list that "will be " :

(1) soldering iron  (some lame goot brand )

(2) agilent E3610A

(3) BK Precision 4017A 10 MHz sweep/function gen

(4) rigol-DS1052E

(5) fluke 87V

(6) fluke 287

(7) HP-3478A

and a nice 1.6M long , 90CM deep 95CM height bench (with two shelves )  one will be 17CM height from the desk and there will be 40CM distance between the shelves

is this is good set up for the budget ?

should I replace one of the purchases ?

thank you in advance !
 

Offline T4P

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Re: lab equipment
« Reply #17 on: April 25, 2012, 10:03:38 am »
Replace the power supply with a soldering station and get a cheapie one from china , then buy the HP only later on .
Really , you can't go anywhere without a soldering station except breadboarding .
 

Offline eevblogfan

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Re: lab equipment
« Reply #18 on: April 25, 2012, 11:53:26 am »
hey

thank's

I already have soldering iron , and I can do with it the basic stuff (200W for high gage wier's and 20W for 30AWG )as for PCB , I press 3 sec on the boost and the soldering iron is hot enough besides , I can connect dimmer in series with it and via K type thermo couple , I can "adjust" the very coarse temp I'd like to have (in essence. all I need is 0-60W or so , temp is not really the way of monitoring it , for bigger thermal load , you need higher power , and the 400C mark on the soldering station , basically mean, that the soldering station will allow the needed ammount of power (till 60W) in order to achieve the 400C that you set for , and it won't exceed it ,


so when I'll have to consider the temp (for tiny chips) I'll consider buying some hakko FX-888 or so , for now on , I am pretty much fine :P

as for the Hp power supply , I know it's not cheap , but it's reliable and good value for the money ,

oh , and you must know , I can work one month in year ( on summer ) hence the "lame" 740$ budget (I had 210$ savings) , next year it will be something like 871$ (and maybe some 300$ addition for temporary work or so .)

thank you in advance  !
 

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Re: lab equipment
« Reply #19 on: April 25, 2012, 01:49:14 pm »
Frequency counter, a cheap bench model 100 bucks, add a rubidium standard for accuracy. A digital scope will give you frequency but it won't be very accurate on a low end scope.


Worth pointing out that the Rigol DS1052 has a hardware frequency counter built in (which you need to enable). It gives me 56ppm on an 8.000MHz crystal. Of course it be that the crystal and counter are both wrong...

John
 

Offline eevblogfan

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Re: lab equipment
« Reply #20 on: April 25, 2012, 03:14:18 pm »
thank you john .

you saved me some real money :P , I appreciate that a lot !



and as for project I'd like to build , I'd like to have some dummy load ( 0-2A will do ) I guess that CPU heat sink will do [2 ranges ; (1). 0-2A@up to 25V or even lower , (2). 0-1A@up to about 50V ] so total of about 50W , I think 2 mosfets will do (decreasing thermal resistance in order to decrease temp over ambient )

but also 0-20A on another 300W heat sink ,

what tools should I have for that project ?  ???

is it :

scope ( I don't have ... )  some (3) multimeters (which I have )  some power source ( preferd current limited power supply , in order to don't blow up anything ><" )

and ... what else is needed ?

BTW . I know I don't need 4 CH scope . therefor . I think to get some old analog scope (2CH ) just if needed . and of course , if I don't need It isn't in my "lab"  , so now I don't need it hence it's just for the future plans of mine
 
thank you in advance !
 

Offline pickle9000

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Re: lab equipment
« Reply #21 on: April 25, 2012, 03:30:17 pm »
Don't forget when buying anything the line voltage must be correct. Some things are 220v only as well as 115 only. Nothing worse than buying gear and not being able to plug it in. Of course there are ways around that but be a careful shopper and it will make it easier.

The BK function gen and Agilent power supply are examples line voltages are not the same. Agilent says 220v and the Function gen says nothing so make sure you contact the seller and ask.

...mike
 

Offline eevblogfan

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Re: lab equipment
« Reply #22 on: April 25, 2012, 03:52:53 pm »
thank's mike , the link will not be valid when I'll get my budget , the links there for illustration purposes only ,


thank you in advance !
 

Offline pickle9000

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Re: lab equipment
« Reply #23 on: April 25, 2012, 09:08:53 pm »
thank's mike , the link will not be valid when I'll get my budget , the links there for illustration purposes only ,

Even so, you picked out some good stuff. I'd be happy to have those items sharing some space on my bench. Everyone want's the best but good serviceable equipment is so important when you are starting.   

...mike
 

Offline codeboy2k

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Re: lab equipment
« Reply #24 on: April 26, 2012, 01:37:56 am »
In my experience, I've found the most use out of 2 or 3 power supplies, and at least 2, usually 4 DMM's.  This is
because I want to see voltage and current both at the input of a module/device under test and at the output.

A minimum 2 channel scope, and 4 if you can afford it. After that, you'll likely not need to buy a scope again, for a
very long time.

A basic function generator is necessary for design/debug.  I wish I had more than 1, or a 2-channel unit. As it turns out,
I often have to breadboard up a simple oscillator (or 2) when I need more than my single channel function generator can
provide. 

I haven't had much need for a frequency counter, as I don't do much RF work, but I have used a basic frequency
counter done in VHDL, flashed into an FPGA development board, to verify those oscillators that I end up having to build,
above.  Or I use the counter in the scope, depending on whether or not the scope channels are busy or not.

I own a USB logic analyzer, the LogicPort LA1034.  Really great instrument for seeing bus signals in the digital world.
It also has a built in frequency counter.

I want more cables, banana plug/jack type for power, more cables with smd clips (lots!), etc.  So don't underestimate
the value of lots of cables and clips.  I wish I had more than I have.  SMD and post grippers are far, far better than
alligator clips.  I have too many alligator clips and not enough smd/post grippers.

Good luck with your lab build and have fun!






 

Offline eevblogfan

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Re: lab equipment
« Reply #25 on: April 27, 2012, 03:51:05 pm »
hey

thank you for the tip !


is this is a good deal ?

http://www.ebay.com/itm/270768755476?ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1497.l2649#ht_857wt_1029

total cost : 250$ including shipping , is it good idea ?

thank you in advance ! :)
 

Offline hlavac

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Re: lab equipment
« Reply #26 on: April 27, 2012, 05:20:50 pm »
If you are going to do some microcontrollers, think about adding AVR Dragon or PicKit 3 (2?). I got both.
Good enough is the enemy of the best.
 

Offline eevblogfan

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Re: lab equipment
« Reply #27 on: April 27, 2012, 06:53:36 pm »
thank you , but I am more excited in the logick circuits and through-hole component ( the problem with SMD is that if you've got limited budget ,in my opinion , it will cos you more them through-hole  and prototype board )









thank you in advance ! :)
 

Offline eevblogfan

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Re: lab equipment
« Reply #28 on: April 30, 2012, 06:51:33 pm »
well I am about to pay for that HP-E3610A shortly , does anyone think it's wrong or not so smart ? (really ,I need to hear you're comments )


thank you in advance ! :)
 

Offline olsenn

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Re: lab equipment
« Reply #29 on: April 30, 2012, 07:00:14 pm »
Quote
well I am about to pay for that HP-E3610A shortly , does anyone think it's wrong or not so smart ? (really ,I need to hear you're comments )


How much are you thinking of paying for it? Buying HP/Agilent is usually a BAD idea because they are far overpriced. This particular PSU isn't all that great: 30W is quite pathetic really. I'd recommend going for a GPS-4303 (http://www.tequipment.net/InstekGPS4303.html) if you can.
 

Offline TerminalJack505

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Re: lab equipment
« Reply #30 on: April 30, 2012, 07:26:21 pm »
well I am about to pay for that HP-E3610A shortly , does anyone think it's wrong or not so smart ? (really ,I need to hear you're comments )


thank you in advance ! :)

Just so you know...  If you are in the US or Canada and you buy a new Agilent E3600-series power supply, you get a free U1272A multimeter.

Test Equity has them
 

Offline eevblogfan

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Re: lab equipment
« Reply #31 on: May 01, 2012, 02:32:32 am »
thanks , I am already know that , but unfortunately , I am not from there  :'(   . and I have got 3 meters too , so with my  950$ limited budget, I think it won't be so smart , but thank you anyway !



Quote
How much are you thinking of paying for it? Buying HP/Agilent is usually a BAD idea because they are far overpriced. This particular PSU isn't all that great: 30W is quite pathetic really. I'd recommend going for a GPS-4303 (http://www.tequipment.net/InstekGPS4303.html) if you can.

hey , thank you , but I am not after the power here , what I was looking for is the low ripple high usability and reliability in the long term . 

for the higher power project's of mine , in the future , I'll build the 300W power supply I wanted too , ( 4X 0-15V@0-5A , or maybe even 1.25V -2.5-upon the regulation circuit , ) I really think that 0-6V@3A and 0-15V@2A is quiet ideal for circuitry (  op-amps, amplifiers,oscillators , etc etc ... )

for now, I have got "hacked" ATX , I changed the voltage to be about 12.2V@18A full load (It does some high frequency noise from the transformer or maybe the switching element's - IE  MOSFET's ><"  ) so for  216W power supply (at the 12V terminal only ! ) it's kinda hi power and I can't really see why should I go over my head ,  I might build some electronic load ; 120W (0-120V@0-10A )  so at 12V@10A or as high as 120V@ 1A I think it should do for me :P

at the beginning , I had some crazy ideas (such as 0-30V@0-100A power supply ) , but at the time , I realized , that a good idea will be to use some chippie ATX power supplies if needed (rewound the secondary and change few components  and values ) ,

look at me , my requirements went that low , from 3KW down to 30W  ::)

I figured that if I'll need some 30V@10A supply , I'll go to that page and begin with soldering , here : http://www.chirio.com/switching_power_supply_atx.htm

thank you in advance !
« Last Edit: May 01, 2012, 03:02:02 am by eevblogfan »
 

Offline T4P

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Re: lab equipment
« Reply #32 on: May 01, 2012, 08:43:24 am »
Wait , have i seen any GW Instek stuff break down ? NO !
Skip the HP . I have not seen any china PSU clones break down either , they are simple enough not to break down in a few months .
Mind you GW Instek comes from Taiwan and Taiwan is very unlike China neither is GW Instek like any of the other China manufacturers .
 

Offline eevblogfan

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Offline T4P

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Re: lab equipment
« Reply #34 on: May 04, 2012, 03:16:39 pm »
Skip the analogs.
Get the DS1052e if you are in a pinch for money, or else get the SDS7102.
Thankfully DS1102e doesn't cost much more but at the price of the DS1102e it is SMARTER to go for the owon.

Unless you got so lucky that the ds1052e can be hacked mang.
 

Offline eevblogfan

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Re: lab equipment
« Reply #35 on: May 05, 2012, 09:32:51 am »
hey

thanks for replay ,

I saw the ds1102E for 399$ hence I think I'll put that money . unlike the owon . I saw for like 650$ or something (correct me if I'm wrong ... )


thank you in advance ! :)
 

Offline T4P

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Re: lab equipment
« Reply #36 on: May 05, 2012, 10:10:27 am »
hey

thanks for replay ,

I saw the ds1102E for 399$ hence I think I'll put that money . unlike the owon . I saw for like 650$ or something (correct me if I'm wrong ... )


thank you in advance ! :)

A shop quoted me 565 for VGA+Battery. Good deal i'll say
 


Offline Kilroy

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Re: lab equipment
« Reply #38 on: May 05, 2012, 01:52:04 pm »
Skip the analogs.

Why do I always cringe when I read something like this?
The fool generalizes the particular; the nerd particularizes the general; some do both; and the wise does neither.
 

Offline MikeK

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Re: lab equipment
« Reply #39 on: May 05, 2012, 02:30:43 pm »
Yeah, I would get one of each.  Getting the DSO first, though, because of the storage ability.
 

Offline T4P

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Re: lab equipment
« Reply #40 on: May 05, 2012, 09:59:04 pm »
Skip the analogs.

Why do I always cringe when I read something like this?

Maybe it is due to the sort of chats i have been having with a PEE.

Or maybe it is just me who doesn't want to spend extra since i don't like the Auto button on digital scopes after all.

But if you think about it, without overclocked ADC's and 10M full speed memory, why not?

Makes analogs pointless, only if one has the extra cash. I still don't see a point of a extra bulky scope, can someone enlighten me?
 

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Re: lab equipment
« Reply #41 on: May 06, 2012, 01:13:49 am »
Screen refresh rate (which is usually only limited by sweep speed and trigger re-arm delay), screen resolution (it's much easier to see a small wiggle on a real CRT without quantization), intensity grading (which many DSOs try to emulate) for example. Sure, they are rarely used in the industry, but so are the cheap low-end DSOs that hobbyists like to use.
 

Offline T4P

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Re: lab equipment
« Reply #42 on: May 06, 2012, 05:26:31 am »
Screen refresh rate (which is usually only limited by sweep speed and trigger re-arm delay), screen resolution (it's much easier to see a small wiggle on a real CRT without quantization), intensity grading (which many DSOs try to emulate) for example. Sure, they are rarely used in the industry, but so are the cheap low-end DSOs that hobbyists like to use.

Yes. A DSO3000X is fast, but hey, that's far more expensive then a analog.
Still not buying a analog, i don't have the space.
 

Offline BravoV

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Re: lab equipment
« Reply #43 on: May 06, 2012, 06:22:59 am »
Skip the analogs.

Why do I always cringe when I read something like this?

Ah .. you've bumped into that crap poster again, just put him your the ignore list.

This dude is well known of producing lots of annoying crap posts in this forum.

Offline T4P

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Re: lab equipment
« Reply #44 on: May 06, 2012, 06:27:54 am »
Skip the analogs.

Why do I always cringe when I read something like this?

Ah .. you've bumped into that crap poster again, just put him your the ignore list.

This dude is well known of producing lots of annoying crap posts in this forum.

 

Online EEVblog

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Re: lab equipment
« Reply #45 on: May 06, 2012, 11:54:02 am »
I wonder if Dave has ever counted the number of meters he has?

It's well over 20, but the majority are cheapies.
For me, a well equipped lab will have at least 2 good high end meters on tap (e.g. Fluke 87 class), plus another two cheaper ones.
4 is handy for simultaneous input/output power measurements for example.
Plus a pocket meter is handy too.

Dave.
 

Online EEVblog

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Re: lab equipment
« Reply #46 on: May 06, 2012, 12:00:38 pm »
Or maybe it is just me who doesn't want to spend extra since i don't like the Auto button on digital scopes after all.
But if you think about it, without overclocked ADC's and 10M full speed memory, why not?
Makes analogs pointless, only if one has the extra cash. I still don't see a point of a extra bulky scope, can someone enlighten me?

Lower noise floor and greater resolution is the usual answer, and seeing stuff the cheap low update rate digital scopes can't.
But the extra space and extra money can be a big deciding factor for many to not get one, and the fact that it would likely be rarely used if you have a modern DSO.
If you could only have ONE scope, it would have to be a modern DSO, as they are just so much more flexible.
But an analog is still nice to have "just in case". And especially so for a beginner to play around with.

Dave.
 

Offline T4P

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Re: lab equipment
« Reply #47 on: May 06, 2012, 12:58:30 pm »
Or maybe it is just me who doesn't want to spend extra since i don't like the Auto button on digital scopes after all.
But if you think about it, without overclocked ADC's and 10M full speed memory, why not?
Makes analogs pointless, only if one has the extra cash. I still don't see a point of a extra bulky scope, can someone enlighten me?

Lower noise floor and greater resolution is the usual answer, and seeing stuff the cheap low update rate digital scopes can't.
But the extra space and extra money can be a big deciding factor for many to not get one, and the fact that it would likely be rarely used if you have a modern DSO.
If you could only have ONE scope, it would have to be a modern DSO, as they are just so much more flexible.
But an analog is still nice to have "just in case". And especially so for a beginner to play around with.

Dave.

This was exactly what i was trying to say. Thanks Dave
 

Offline eevblogfan

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Re: lab equipment
« Reply #48 on: May 08, 2012, 04:15:33 am »
I have paied for the HP-3610E

so about 20-30 days and I'll have it in my hands :P

I have also orderd dave's uCurrent adapter , It should arrive within few days !

next thing is scope . only on the 8.11.12 ( the money would be relised to me at the 10.8.12 or day after :'(  )

oh and I sold all of mine 5 12AH 12V SLA batteries ( 3Xold stok but good condition , and 2 used )
so not really big capacity is left there :P

all for 128$ ( like 25.64$ per each )  ne one here cost tines 2 . so for old +used ones , half a price (in my country )  is a good profit :P

well , now I have got 128$ extra to spend (or invest should I say ? )

what should I buy ?

well I thout about :

1, lab bread boeard

2,some component kits ( especcialy resistors )

3,set of tweesers

4,set of schrew drivers+ emergency type 

5,some drawers

6,mixed smiconductor components ( power transistors, regolators,mosfets, etc )

7, some prototype  boards

8, that soldering iron tip cleaner ( sort of metal spong)

9,some connectors and banana plugs

10, maybe some trimmers kit ( I found them really useful on the breadboard )

and thats it , any other idea (s) >?

thank you in advance !
 

Offline M. András

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Re: lab equipment
« Reply #49 on: May 08, 2012, 06:41:30 pm »
i have that metal sponge in my weller toolstand, hell its make a mess, tiny solder balls etc if you flip the thing and it falls out and slightly used up bits of its way stands out from the whole thing, plugs and wires always good idea, as for resistor there are some assortsmen on ebay but dunno about the quality but they state its 1% and few thousand resistors for few bucks is not a bad deal, for component drawyers http://hu.farnell.com/raaco/126762/cabinet-organiser-44compartment/dp/1367091 someone posted these on this forum and they looks nice, but when i have money they dont stock it...
 

Offline eevblogfan

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Re: lab equipment
« Reply #50 on: May 08, 2012, 08:50:22 pm »
is it 6K$ ???????????????,  or am I blind 0_0 ????


edit :


ooops , it's huf , my bad , (stupid google chrome translation )

it's like a 25$ , kinda nice , thank you :P
« Last Edit: May 08, 2012, 08:54:27 pm by eevblogfan »
 

Offline eevblogfan

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Re: lab equipment
« Reply #51 on: May 09, 2012, 12:18:39 pm »
yayyyyyyyy !

the uCurrent has arrived ! (it's in the mail ) so only tommorow I'll be able to play with it :P
 

Offline M. András

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Re: lab equipment
« Reply #52 on: May 09, 2012, 03:12:10 pm »
is it 6K$ ???????????????,  or am I blind 0_0 ????


edit :


ooops , it's huf , my bad , (stupid google chrome translation )

it's like a 25$ , kinda nice , thank you :P

its huf yes, would be better if it was 25 but not in usd but in huf, i would love it :D
 

Offline eevblogfan

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Re: lab equipment
« Reply #53 on: May 10, 2012, 10:08:30 am »
hey !

I recived my uCurrent !!!

I am building a 0-1A CC , so I hope that pictures would be uploaded shortly  !

have anice day ! :)
 

Offline FenderBender

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Re: lab equipment
« Reply #54 on: May 28, 2012, 12:08:51 am »
I don't know what you intend to do, but I'm assuming you are young? I'm 17 years old, so if you are also young, I'm in your shoes. I have a Tektronix 465m. It's about a 35 year old scope but in MARVELOUS condition. I mean the build quality is top notch, internally and externally. Just beautiful. No Chinese scope could touch one of these old analog scopes.

Plus analog is no BS. Not ADC or possibly glitchy digital processing. Just straight-up analog electronics.

I got mine for $85 shipped to my house. Wow! 100MHz which is plenty of bandwidth for my needs.

I don't really see the point of investing in a DSO right now, because I'm not sure how much you'd get out of it. Are you going to use the TTL decoders and logic analyzers etc.?

If so, then go for it, but I think a cheap used analog scope will do you well. Only challenge it presents is space...


In addition, get a decent soldering iron, but don't go overboard and spend $500 on a JBC. Sparkfun has a nice Hakko 936 clone. I think it's like $40. Excellent iron. They even give you an internal build shot on Sparkfun. Looks pretty good.


Get between 2-4 multimeters. If you plan on doing anything with power electronics, then you might want to make some efficiency readings and you might, for example, want to compare watts-in to watts-out. 2 meters is fine for most, but you might find yourself wanting more.

You'll probably want a True RMS meter or two. My recommendation is to go with Amprobe. Excellent value in my opinion. I have 2 Amprobe meters myself and they are just really good for the money. I own the AM-270 and I highly recommend it. Very accurate and build quality looks like it's of a $200+ meter. You can get it for $80. You might want to get two of these more expensive meters and maybe 2 more meters within the $30-50 range. Amprobe AM-510, AM-240, or Extech 330 are very good meters in the category.

EDIT: Whoops completley did not see that Dave suggested this already...like exactly this. ^

Power supply! As you say, you want to build one yourself. It's a very manageable project if you'd like to do it yourself. I'm in the process of doing the same. However, you should be aware that you are not going to save money building your own PSU. And you'll probably have less functionality. You would probably be building a linear supply. If you really want up to 5A and 30V, you're going to need a hell of a transformer, some big heatsinks, big case and some overall pretty heavy duty stuff. It can get pretty expensive. If you can deal with that, then go for it.

I'd recommend getting some sort of vice. Panavise Jr. ss a pretty good stand. I have a "helping-hands". They are okay, but sometimes they just get you mad. I'd recommend something a little sturdier. You can also make your own type of vice if you'd like.

A whole lot of jumper wires and connectors. Wires with 4mm banana terminations are excellent since a lot of connectors are compatible with banana plugs. You should have maybe 3-5 sets of these. You can buy cheap banana plugs and mate some 14-18AWG wire with them if you'd like. Sometimes the legit banana patch wires a bit pricey.

A breadboard is super-helpful. Get a decent one. Don't go for the ultra cheapies. I think 3M makes decent boards. There's also a lot of good ones on eBay, but just be careful. Don't get a tiny breadboard, but you don't have to get one that's like 2ft x 2ft.

Some good lighting. I find that good lighting can make me much more productive. Try to position your lab by a window. Unfortuneatly I'm in my basement which can get depressing at times peering a circuit that I Was certain worked. A window helps you relax IMO.  But good lighting can help with this.

Anti-static mat. No, not the type that PC repair guys use. Like a big sheet of blue, green or black anti static matting. It's also a little tacky so your stuff doesn't roll around and good contrast to things like metallic wires and electronic components so you don't loose things.

A computer. If you don't have a computer near by, it's very helpful, especially if you want to look at a datasheet for some part. It's a pain in the arse to have to get up and google it and then go back and work on it.

A calculator. Doesn't have to be anything fancy. A cheap TI, Casio or HP scientific will do you well.

Lastly, your brain. That's where the true magic happens!

EDIT: Sorry I didn't see that you had some good meters already, and I didn't see your updates!
« Last Edit: May 28, 2012, 12:15:35 am by FenderBender »
 

Offline hitachi8

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Re: lab equipment
« Reply #55 on: May 28, 2012, 03:00:33 pm »
as Dave stated in many video; you can get an old analog scope for 50$.
for that price you can't really live without, those are practical too.
sure you cant save and view forms like you can with a modern one, but that's better than spending
300-500$ on one thing that you will only use 50hours a year.
 

Offline eevblogfan

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Re: lab equipment
« Reply #56 on: May 29, 2012, 04:42:26 am »
hey


hitachi8 . yes . because 50 hours is pretty much all I got for fun ,

hey fenderbender , I'm 16 years old , just 1 year apart :P

I plan to get locally an old analog scope , just for what Dave has mentioned , the old ones can capture things that the DSO just cant , plus , If I'll have both the DSO and the analog , I'll have 4CH to work with if I'll need to :P

I received my HP-3610A , great power supply , came calibrated+certificate , the only thing was the knobs , few (6) of them was either not match the pic or slightly tear (the binding posts ... )

apart from that , wow , that's a good one ,  Question : I set the voltage to X value . and then I loaded it with 0-1A CC , the difference between the set voltage and the voltage under load was exactly 82mV (I tried few voltage setting ,) is it OK for those HP-36XX series power supply ?

now my project is that 1A CC , after that , I'll work on the PS , the whole idea is not to compare with low ripple noise and stuff like this ,  the supply should be capable to just power on some stuff , the desired values are 15V at 5A X4  ,

now when I thinking on it , can you all post me here ,

(1) . what sort of field you are working at ?

(2) . what are the voltage@current requirement that you very often need/use ?

(3) .whats the number of channels you find yourself "must  have"

(4) .how important is the ripple noise for that usage ?

(5) .what is the accuracy(and number of counts[or]> 4 1/2 or 3 1/2 ) needed for the panel meters & the CV set ?

(6) assuming I'd like to have multiple ranges (for each individual CH ) what are the CC & CV valeuse you'll recommend/need for each range ?

(7) what option(s) (besides remote sens )  you "must" have for you're own usage(s) ?

if you've got more questions you'd like to ask / think I should think of , please post them here !

(+++) : if that post need to be in another thread please note me (either here of in PM m I think (?) :P )

thank you in advance ! and I hope that will get me off the un needed specs and focus me straight froward the real target I've aimed for :P 

 


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