Author Topic: Lab light, what would you reccomend?  (Read 395 times)

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Offline FriedMule

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Lab light, what would you reccomend?
« on: June 30, 2019, 12:11:05 am »
I have looked a Dave's videos about his light and upgrades, I have also tired to read on this forum and other places but I can't seems to find some, for me, easy to understand, guides and some "bye that product". I am using 240V.

As I do understand, can the light make color look wrong and that would be a bad idea for me, since I also have to use that light when I mix tiny amount of paint.
My ceiling is made of one single layer plasterboard screwed to some thin wooden beams, so not too heave <10 lbs per lamp.
It would also be nice if it is long lasting and easy to change the "light bulbs" that do not flicker on video.
Oh and I would really like to avoid any of that annoying hum some lights do make. :-)
 

Offline HB9EVI

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Re: Lab light, what would you reccomend?
« Reply #1 on: June 30, 2019, 09:01:00 am »
I used over a long time fluorescent bulbs; then I got a LED bulb with the same lamp socket, but it produced a lot RFI; some month ago I bought a RND magnifying glass LED lamp. I had to get used to the cold-white LED colour since I was used to warm-white, but it's really pleasant to work with it.
brightness is adjustable and the lamp is RFI-free - what is the most important to me.
 

Offline Psi

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Re: Lab light, what would you reccomend?
« Reply #2 on: June 30, 2019, 09:14:53 am »
If you have the money build a 100W Yuji led room light using a 50W 3600k and 50W 5600k COB emitter + heatsink + fan.

Using two emitters you can then tune the color temp to your liking between 3600 and 5600k

I used two 5600k emitters on mine but i think it would be better a bit warmer, maybe 4000k.

« Last Edit: June 30, 2019, 11:27:11 pm by Psi »
Greek letter 'Psi' (not Pounds per Square Inch)
 

Offline tkamiya

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Re: Lab light, what would you reccomend?
« Reply #3 on: June 30, 2019, 04:25:58 pm »
My general room lighting is two 4200 Kelvin LED fixture, I think 1700 lumen or something each.

Then right over the work desk, there is a 5000 K stick type LED fixture (one looks like regular old florescent lighting) hung low to the table.  This one can be turned off easily from sitting position.  Very good for assembly and visual testing work.

I like BRIGHT.  What didn't work for me were any type that sits on desk.  They kept getting in a way.  Unless you go extreme, your eyes adjust to lights' color temperature.  I never had issue with color recognition with this setup.
 

Offline Andreas

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Re: Lab light, what would you reccomend?
« Reply #4 on: June 30, 2019, 08:01:17 pm »

As I do understand, can the light make color look wrong and that would be a bad idea for me, since I also have to use that light when I mix tiny amount of paint.


So you will need a lamp with a high CRI-value (near 100%).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Color_rendering_index

Halogen lamps would be a good choice.

or some certain (965 type Daylight) fluorescent lamps. (CRI > 90%)
https://www.beleuchtungdirekt.de/osram-l-36w-965-lumilux-de-luxe-120cm-tageslichtweiss

Led lamps often have only about CRI ~80%.

With best regards

Andreas

 

Offline tkamiya

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Re: Lab light, what would you reccomend?
« Reply #5 on: June 30, 2019, 10:24:33 pm »
I am an amateur photographer.  I know a bit about color temperature.  CRI is a very misleading term and often misused.  If accurate and consistent representation is important, then full spectrum and color balanced light is required.  Museums spend thousands on lighting for this reason. 

To get color mixture right, you will need a light booth.  Background and color near by will fool your eyes.  This can by DIY'd.  You could google DIY light booth and you can find all about lights and constructions.  Keep in mind, this is separate from general lighting.  It's a small area that will be dedicated for this purpose.

I used to have a direct source of lights museums and pro photographers often use.  I can't find it anymore. 

Good luck in finding a solution.  It's possible but it's going to be costly and more complex that it should be.  (of course, I'm talking about full professional setup.  you can do it cheaper but performance will suffer)
 

Offline David Hess

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Re: Lab light, what would you reccomend?
« Reply #6 on: July 01, 2019, 11:22:14 am »
I still prefer linear fluorescent tubes with passive ballasts.  The large surface area and length prevent shadows, fluorescent tubes are available with whatever temperature and color rendering you want, and the passive ballast produces little EMI.
 


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