Author Topic: MPSA70 PNP Transistor  (Read 329 times)

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Offline dcbrown73

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MPSA70 PNP Transistor
« on: August 16, 2019, 03:52:16 pm »
Hey all,

I'm assembling an Elenco XP-720 power supply kit.  There is a MPSA70 PNP transistor and after soldering it in.  I wanted to ensure I didn't create any bridges.  So I used my DMM's continuity tester and I show continuity between all three legs.  I don't (even using a magnifying glass) see any bridges, so I wanted to ask if this positive continuity test is correct?

Why exactly do people feel I should have read their post before I responded?  As if that was necessary for me to get my point across.
 

Offline Seekonk

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Re: MPSA70 PNP Transistor
« Reply #1 on: August 16, 2019, 04:00:37 pm »
I had to look twice when I saw that. We used to design with that transistor and I don't remember it as being able to take that much current. Well, it is a very low voltage.  You should be seeing what passes for continuity on all three legs.
 

Offline Emo

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Re: MPSA70 PNP Transistor
« Reply #2 on: August 16, 2019, 04:27:14 pm »
Hi reading near to zero ohm is correct. This transistor is taking care of the current protection. As the values of th resistors in the circuit are very low it is hardly possible to read the values under normal situations

Regards, Eric
 
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Offline dcbrown73

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Re: MPSA70 PNP Transistor
« Reply #3 on: August 16, 2019, 04:28:47 pm »
I had to look twice when I saw that. We used to design with that transistor and I don't remember it as being able to take that much current. Well, it is a very low voltage.  You should be seeing what passes for continuity on all three legs.

When I test it with the continuity tester, I get the following:
  • Emitter -> Base:  3.1 ohm
  • Emitter -> Collector: 5.8 ohm
  • Base -> Collector: 2.9 ohm
Why exactly do people feel I should have read their post before I responded?  As if that was necessary for me to get my point across.
 

Offline dcbrown73

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Re: MPSA70 PNP Transistor
« Reply #4 on: August 16, 2019, 04:29:58 pm »
Hi reading near to zero ohm is correct. This transistor is taking care of the current protection. As the values of th resistors in the circuit are very low it is hardly possible to read the values under normal situations

Regards, Eric

Thank you!
Why exactly do people feel I should have read their post before I responded?  As if that was necessary for me to get my point across.
 

Offline Zero999

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Re: MPSA70 PNP Transistor
« Reply #5 on: August 16, 2019, 04:37:42 pm »
I had to look twice when I saw that. We used to design with that transistor and I don't remember it as being able to take that much current. Well, it is a very low voltage.  You should be seeing what passes for continuity on all three legs.

When I test it with the continuity tester, I get the following:
  • Emitter -> Base:  3.1 ohm
  • Emitter -> Collector: 5.8 ohm
  • Base -> Collector: 2.9 ohm
Those readings seem to be correct.

Most modern continuity testers us such a low voltage that the transistor itself will show as an open circuit or extremely high resistance of several MΩ.

For example, from the emitter to collector you'll get the values of R3 to R5 added in series, which is 0.18+2.7+2.7 = 5.58, which is pretty close to what you've measured, which will be a bit higher due to the resistance of the test leads. You'll probably find it doesn't read exactly zero, even if you short the test leads of the continuity tester.
 
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Offline floobydust

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Re: MPSA70 PNP Transistor
« Reply #6 on: August 16, 2019, 10:18:49 pm »
Note the PSU is missing protection diodes for the voltage reg IC's. It's in the LM317 datasheet- Fig. 20; one across the Vreg, one across 10uF cap, and another at the output to cover reverse polarity. You need these for a bench power supply that can take some abuse, and charge batteries. I would add them in at some point as I have wrecked every power supply that does not have them.

The 5V 3A current-limiter circuit with Q1 has R4 and R3 very low in value at 2.7 ohms so in-circuit readings would be confusing.

MSPA70 is a bit of an oddball part and substitute would be a 2N3906 or BC557B (reverse pinout). Sometimes manufacturers use whatever they have lots of laying around.
 

Offline dcbrown73

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Re: MPSA70 PNP Transistor
« Reply #7 on: August 17, 2019, 01:59:26 am »
Note the PSU is missing protection diodes for the voltage reg IC's. It's in the LM317 datasheet- Fig. 20; one across the Vreg, one across 10uF cap, and another at the output to cover reverse polarity. You need these for a bench power supply that can take some abuse, and charge batteries. I would add them in at some point as I have wrecked every power supply that does not have them.

The 5V 3A current-limiter circuit with Q1 has R4 and R3 very low in value at 2.7 ohms so in-circuit readings would be confusing.

MSPA70 is a bit of an oddball part and substitute would be a 2N3906 or BC557B (reverse pinout). Sometimes manufacturers use whatever they have lots of laying around.

I would just directly attach the 1n4002 directly across pins 2 & 3 of the LM317?
Why exactly do people feel I should have read their post before I responded?  As if that was necessary for me to get my point across.
 

Offline Jwillis

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Re: MPSA70 PNP Transistor
« Reply #8 on: August 17, 2019, 02:48:49 am »
Note the PSU is missing protection diodes for the voltage reg IC's. It's in the LM317 datasheet- Fig. 20; one across the Vreg, one across 10uF cap, and another at the output to cover reverse polarity. You need these for a bench power supply that can take some abuse, and charge batteries. I would add them in at some point as I have wrecked every power supply that does not have them.

The 5V 3A current-limiter circuit with Q1 has R4 and R3 very low in value at 2.7 ohms so in-circuit readings would be confusing.

MSPA70 is a bit of an oddball part and substitute would be a 2N3906 or BC557B (reverse pinout). Sometimes manufacturers use whatever they have lots of laying around.

I would just directly attach the 1n4002 directly across pins 2 & 3 of the LM317?

Only on the lm317.The protection diodes for the lm337 will be different.Opposite direction I mean
« Last Edit: August 17, 2019, 02:53:13 am by Jwillis »
 

Offline floobydust

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Re: MPSA70 PNP Transistor
« Reply #9 on: August 17, 2019, 03:52:51 am »
For the LM317 and LM337, total six protection diodes gives full coverage for the IC's. 1N4002 is OK, I like bigger 1N5402 across the output in case I connect a battery backwards as they are harder to smoke.
Schematic for them just like here: https://sound-au.com/project44.htm

The LM7805 should not get abused as such powering digital circuits. A diode across C-E of Q2 2N6124, and a reverse polarity diode across the output would cover it.
 


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