Author Topic: Need info on taking and learning PIC Programming  (Read 1383 times)

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Offline Martian Tech

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Re: Need info on taking and learning PIC Programming
« Reply #25 on: March 31, 2021, 04:15:34 am »
A good part of the fun of using PIC processors is finding the one that best suits your particular project's needs.  It makes you actually understand what you're trying to build and think about the requirements up front.  How many GPIOs do you need? Timers? ADCs? DACs? Serial ports? Capacitive touch, etc...  You don't just buy the biggest, fastest chip, but use the selection tools provided by Microchip to narrow things down.  "Supported by TL866" is another filter you can add (but not provided by Microchip tools).  So I would pretty much ignore any recommendations in this thread about what someone else's favorite PIC processor is.  Find your own favorites based on your own project requirements.
 
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Offline vishkas

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Re: Need info on taking and learning PIC Programming
« Reply #26 on: March 31, 2021, 04:56:23 am »
To start learning about the PIC microcontroller boards, start by doing some good projects and explore the concepts. I found this site with some good basic to advanced projects on PIC --> https://www.theengineeringprojects.com/2015/03/pic-microcontroller-projects.html
 
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Offline Sigma957

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Re: Need info on taking and learning PIC Programming
« Reply #27 on: March 31, 2021, 07:30:36 am »
I have had several programmers TL866A, TL866cs and now the TL866II programmer. (not fakes sold on some sites)
I have never used them yet as I have no knowledge in programming.

If you want to use those programmers, you need to select a PIC that can use them.  It doesn't seem like the 16F series is covered but I didn't spend much time looking.  Some of the 18F chips are supported.


Hello,

I just checked the list for the newest TL866II Plus and it handles 16F, 18F and others. (New specs say 16667 chips) List is massive.
In Fact I just got a firmware update for the Programmers and now all running latest firmware.
The older models I have only go to about 13000 chips.

Thanks for letting me know as it is better to be safe then sorry.

Thanks
Gren
 

Offline Sigma957

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Re: Need info on taking and learning PIC Programming
« Reply #28 on: April 01, 2021, 06:21:15 am »
Hey Guys and Gals,

Just wanted to say thanks for all the reply, help and info.
I am currently reading a book to cover basics and then will do some projects from sites people posted just so I get better understanding.
I assume it will take me awhile to do my own test projects but will post when I do.

Thanks again.
Gren
 

Offline Sigma957

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Re: Need info on taking and learning PIC Programming
« Reply #29 on: April 01, 2021, 11:11:55 pm »
A good part of the fun of using PIC processors is finding the one that best suits your particular project's needs.  It makes you actually understand what you're trying to build and think about the requirements up front.  How many GPIOs do you need? Timers? ADCs? DACs? Serial ports? Capacitive touch, etc...  You don't just buy the biggest, fastest chip, but use the selection tools provided by Microchip to narrow things down.  "Supported by TL866" is another filter you can add (but not provided by Microchip tools).  So I would pretty much ignore any recommendations in this thread about what someone else's favorite PIC processor is.  Find your own favorites based on your own project requirements.

Hello Martian.

I have a question for you based on what you said "A good part of the fun of using PIC processors is finding the one that best suits your particular project's needs".

My confusion is from my lack of knowledge, but why does that one line matter?
What I mean is that since lots of the PIC's I see for sale they are all pretty close in cost (or it appears to me).
Why not just get one type of pic instead of different ones?
I see it as if I buy a large pic and it holds lots of data it would not matter if i had little code in it.

I hope you understand what I mean as I really suck at explaining things.

Thanks in advance
Gren
 

Offline Jan Audio

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Re: Need info on taking and learning PIC Programming
« Reply #30 on: April 02, 2021, 01:51:00 pm »
It means you can search for peripherals.
If you have a chip with PPS means you can use almost any peripheral on almost any pin.
Without PPS you are stuck to having peripherals on fixed pin, or 1 alternate pin.

Keep in mind the peripherals are not the same in all chips,
by example : the PWM module can be more advanced in newer chips.

Yes buy 1 big chip with PPS and you have enough, once you understand all peripherals you can buy a chip that suits your project.
« Last Edit: April 02, 2021, 01:55:38 pm by Jan Audio »
 
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Offline Sigma957

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Re: Need info on taking and learning PIC Programming
« Reply #31 on: April 02, 2021, 09:52:46 pm »
It means you can search for peripherals.
If you have a chip with PPS means you can use almost any peripheral on almost any pin.
Without PPS you are stuck to having peripherals on fixed pin, or 1 alternate pin.

Keep in mind the peripherals are not the same in all chips,
by example : the PWM module can be more advanced in newer chips.

Yes buy 1 big chip with PPS and you have enough, once you understand all peripherals you can buy a chip that suits your project.

Hello,

Thanks for the fast reply and info, I really appreciate it.

I understand and will start basic since I'm a noob.
doing lots of reading now and hope to move on to hands on projects others have done.

Thanks again
Gren
 

Offline Gyro

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Re: Need info on taking and learning PIC Programming
« Reply #32 on: April 03, 2021, 09:56:27 am »
It's a shame the PICKit2 sells for stupid prices on eBay.  I still use mine.  I reprogrammed it so that it handles modern PIC's.

The PICkit3.5 clone of the PICkit3 is still available reasonably cheaply on ebay. You can still use it either under MPLAB or standalone, like the PICkit2.
Chris

"Victor Meldrew, the Crimson Avenger!"
 
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Offline Sigma957

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Re: Need info on taking and learning PIC Programming
« Reply #33 on: April 03, 2021, 04:17:20 pm »
It's a shame the PICKit2 sells for stupid prices on eBay.  I still use mine.  I reprogrammed it so that it handles modern PIC's.

The PICkit3.5 clone of the PICkit3 is still available reasonably cheaply on ebay. You can still use it either under MPLAB or standalone, like the PICkit2.

Hello,

Thanks for letting me know, I might grab one just in case I need it.

Thanks
Gren
 

Online MarkF

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Re: Need info on taking and learning PIC Programming
« Reply #34 on: April 03, 2021, 05:28:35 pm »
It means you can search for peripherals.
If you have a chip with PPS means you can use almost any peripheral on almost any pin.
Without PPS you are stuck to having peripherals on fixed pin, or 1 alternate pin.

Keep in mind the peripherals are not the same in all chips,
by example : the PWM module can be more advanced in newer chips.

Yes buy 1 big chip with PPS and you have enough, once you understand all peripherals you can buy a chip that suits your project.

I would advise the exact opposite.
Having a MCU that can re-map pin functions just adds another whole level of complexity and confusion.
Just wading through the internal clock, timers, analog-to-digital (ADC) and interrupts is big enough of a challenge for the noob.

Just find a simple 14 or 28 pin PIC to get started.
A hand full of cheap $1 MCUs that you can afford to fry are plenty till you get the basics under you belt.
You can't go wrong having a few basic PICs on hand for small projects.

For those big projects in the future, you'll be searching out a MCU that meets its special requirements anyway.
There is no 'one part does all' MCU.  You will always be weighing function with physical size with etc...
« Last Edit: April 03, 2021, 05:30:31 pm by MarkF »
 

Offline Raj

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Re: Need info on taking and learning PIC Programming
« Reply #35 on: April 04, 2021, 10:47:39 am »
PIC just doesn't have enough users in it's community.
I learnt to program AVR using a very cheap book (avr-microcontroller-and-embedded-systems) (image attached).
But before you start to learn to write code, make sure that you can program one. ( I couldn't afford any of the programmer suggested in that book so I used 4 resistor and parallel port method http://danyk.cz/avr_prog_en.html)(Thanks Dan)
Start with trying out other's schematics and codes.
Also, try to learn STM and Espressif stuff. It's easy to transfer from one to another if you learn one but these are the most rewarding.

Also, I knew java before any of these things...Knowing C++, C or java will boost your learning skills a lot. (Python will help build a programming mindset but ones you learn python, other languages will become harder.)


Also know that, the Arduinos you already have are AVR based.


Knowing that you're stuck in home and won't be able to get components easily, try programming pure software stuff first, like Tictactoe game or a clock written in java or C#, or front end written in MySQL, written in java. Try the NCERT Informatic practices book. (image attached) (Do know that finding a printed version of it, is super tough and is only sold in Delhi, India, so everyone taking that subject has to print it using their printer)
« Last Edit: April 04, 2021, 11:00:10 am by Raj »
 
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Offline Sigma957

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Re: Need info on taking and learning PIC Programming
« Reply #36 on: April 09, 2021, 01:14:50 am »
PIC just doesn't have enough users in it's community.
I learnt to program AVR using a very cheap book (avr-microcontroller-and-embedded-systems) (image attached).
But before you start to learn to write code, make sure that you can program one. ( I couldn't afford any of the programmer suggested in that book so I used 4 resistor and parallel port method http://danyk.cz/avr_prog_en.html)(Thanks Dan)
Start with trying out other's schematics and codes.
Also, try to learn STM and Espressif stuff. It's easy to transfer from one to another if you learn one but these are the most rewarding.

Also, I knew java before any of these things...Knowing C++, C or java will boost your learning skills a lot. (Python will help build a programming mindset but ones you learn python, other languages will become harder.)


Also know that, the Arduinos you already have are AVR based.


Knowing that you're stuck in home and won't be able to get components easily, try programming pure software stuff first, like Tictactoe game or a clock written in java or C#, or front end written in MySQL, written in java. Try the NCERT Informatic practices book. (image attached) (Do know that finding a printed version of it, is super tough and is only sold in Delhi, India, so everyone taking that subject has to print it using their printer)

Hello,

Thanks for reply and info, I appreciate it.

I am reading books now and dug out a few parts for testing/building examples in the book(s).

As for stuck at home parts are not my worry at all.
As various local shops can send me what i would need depending on cost.

I will look for the book you suggest and will spend some times reading the books and practicing with examples.

Thanks again for the help.
Gren

 


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