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Sourcing Cassette Style Buttons (But I don't know what they're called)

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devinatkin:
I'm sorry I don't know the proper name, which is probably why I can't find anything related to them. I'm trying to find a source for those buttons where you press one in and the others pop up. I'm repairing an old radio which has them and am currently considering the option of just gutting everything in the radio (The thing just emits the screams of hell currently). But in order to do that I'd need to replace the front panel of buttons which were originally for selecting between frequency ranges.

The plan is to use a raspberry pi (Yes I somehow sourced one of them) Then wire it up and write some scripts so that the buttons and knobs control spotify instead of a real radio. But I need those style buttons in order to make this plan work.


I've searched around and the terms I'm using keep giving me piano key buttons which aren't what I want. Does anyone still make those buttons? Or will I need to go with ones that press down and up, but don't have any sort of mechanism so only one can be pressed at a time.

Benta:
i think you're looking for something like the C&K F-Series of pushbutton switches (originally ITT-Schadow).
It's a Lego-like system where you build the whole thing yourself from rails, switches, release rails etc.
https://www.ckswitches.com/products/switches/product-details/Pushbutton/F/

ebastler:
The C&K switches Benta has linked to may or may not be able to provide what you are looking for. But you will probably struggle to buy the right custom configurations in small quantities. Such interlocked/ganged switches are very uncommon as off-the-shelf parts. I think the audio devices which use(d) them -- radios, cassette recorders etc. -- would typically contain custom-made switch groups and mechanisms.

The common solution today is to emulate the "radio button" functionality in software, and with LED indicators instead of the physically latched switches: Use momentary switches with built-in LEDs; then let your microcontroller or Raspberry Pi enable the LED on the most recently pressed switch only, and disable whichever other LED was on before.

EDIT: Alternatively, if the mechanism in your radio still works: Can you retain either the mechanism + switch contacts, or just the mechanism and put new push-button switches behind it? The interlocking mechanism is what's hard to come by; the switch contacts should be pretty standard.

ledtester:
I've seen these kinds of switches in my local surplus store:

https://www.surplussales.com/switches/swpushb-2.html

https://www.westfloridacomponents.com/SW098APD/5+Position+Push+Button+Gang+Switch.html

https://www.surplusgizmos.com/Comax-6-Gang-Push-Button-Switch-25v-DC-1-Amp_p_2514.html

I think they can be configured to be ganged or independent.

Benta:

--- Quote from: ebastler on August 07, 2022, 04:28:45 pm ---The C&K switches Benta has linked to may or may not be able to provide what you are looking for. But you will probably struggle to buy the right custom configurations in small quantities. Such interlocked/ganged switches are very uncommon as off-the-shelf parts.

--- End quote ---

This is where you're completely wrong. The F-Series can be configured by yourself in single-unit quantities. Thus my "Lego" remark.

Example:
I want an array with one push-on/push-off switch, two mutually exclusive switches and three mutually exclusive switches (aka "radio buttons").
So, I order a mount rail for 6 switches, one push-on/push-off switch and five momentary switches.
Add to that a two-position and a three position release rail and two springs for those.
Lastly, six buttons according to taste/style.

Building the switch array is easy. Lego, like I said.

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