Author Topic: suboptimal conductive traces on PCB  (Read 1068 times)

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Offline m4rtin

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suboptimal conductive traces on PCB
« on: June 15, 2015, 09:29:19 pm »
I have a following piece from a punch-down block for Cat5e cabling:



What is the reason for those fairly large conductive areas on PCB? I mean the ones which are coverd under the lacquer and for example cable strand nr8 will be connected to one of those conductive areas. One would think that it's tiny bit cheaper to produce this PCB if it contains bit less conductive materials or is there actualy a reason simply not to make the traces as thin and straight as possible?
« Last Edit: June 17, 2015, 04:22:17 pm by m4rtin »
 

Online T3sl4co1l

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Re: suboptimal conductive traces on PCB
« Reply #1 on: June 16, 2015, 05:21:09 am »
Image broken, 403.  I think, your Dropbox is not publicly shared?

Copper is generally a small part of the total cost of producing and printing a PCB.  There may be money saved in etching less (the etchant needs less maintenance = faster board production), or in etching more (more maintenance = more recycled copper).  The difference might not even show up until you order a million quantity.

Tim
Seven Transistor Labs, LLC
Electronic design, from concept to prototype.
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Offline m4rtin

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Re: suboptimal conductive traces on PCB
« Reply #2 on: June 18, 2015, 05:18:50 pm »
Image broken, 403.  I think, your Dropbox is not publicly shared?

Copper is generally a small part of the total cost of producing and printing a PCB.  There may be money saved in etching less (the etchant needs less maintenance = faster board production), or in etching more (more maintenance = more recycled copper).  The difference might not even show up until you order a million quantity.

Tim

Sorry, I fixed the image link. Etching is the process of removing a thin layer of copper on PCB except from places where the tracks needs to be? And in a nutshell, at least in this case, there probably is no technical reason not to make the traces as thin and straight as possible?
 


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