Author Topic: What do I need to think about moving away from Arduino?  (Read 1079 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline jrozner

  • Contributor
  • Posts: 21
  • Country: us
What do I need to think about moving away from Arduino?
« on: December 27, 2016, 02:27:16 am »
I'm laying out my first board in EAGLE and using an ATMega64A. I've prototyped it using an Arduino mega (and handful of other components) but am wondering what sorts of supporting components I need to think about when moving away from an Arduino platform and to my own custom board? I've jumped around in the data sheet and found some information about handling unused I/O pins, programming (for various methods), various special pins (RESET, etc.), and power limits but haven't found a suggested example wiring diagram with respect to supplying power or anything other signals like I've seen in some others. Coming from an Arduino I've never had to worry about most of this and just hoping to minimize mistakes that could land me with boards that don't work.
 

Offline rob77

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 1848
  • Country: sk
Re: What do I need to think about moving away from Arduino?
« Reply #1 on: December 27, 2016, 02:34:35 am »
power, decoupling, clock, ISP header - that's a bare minimum for any ATmega, and that's basically what you find on any arduino board (of course most arduino bards also has  a usb-serial connected to 1st serial port of atmega)
 

Online ataradov

  • Super Contributor
  • ***
  • Posts: 5860
  • Country: us
    • Personal site
Re: What do I need to think about moving away from Arduino?
« Reply #2 on: December 27, 2016, 02:36:37 am »
Just look at Arduino schematic and replicate it to the extent necessary for your project. In general, to have a self-sufficient ATmega board all you really need is an ISP programming connector, a few bypass caps on power supply lines, and a pull-up resistor on a reset pin.
Alex
 

Offline GBowes

  • Contributor
  • Posts: 33
  • Country: us
Re: What do I need to think about moving away from Arduino?
« Reply #3 on: December 27, 2016, 03:39:05 am »
You cannot go wrong following Atmel's recommendations. See app notes AVR042 and possibly AVR040 if you have EMC concerns or requirements.
http://www.atmel.com/images/atmel-2521-avr-hardware-design-considerations_applicationnote_avr042.pdf

Graham

I'm laying out my first board in EAGLE and using an ATMega64A. I've prototyped it using an Arduino mega (and handful of other components) but am wondering what sorts of supporting components I need to think about when moving away from an Arduino platform and to my own custom board? I've jumped around in the data sheet and found some information about handling unused I/O pins, programming (for various methods), various special pins (RESET, etc.), and power limits but haven't found a suggested example wiring diagram with respect to supplying power or anything other signals like I've seen in some others. Coming from an Arduino I've never had to worry about most of this and just hoping to minimize mistakes that could land me with boards that don't work.
 

Offline jrozner

  • Contributor
  • Posts: 21
  • Country: us
Re: What do I need to think about moving away from Arduino?
« Reply #4 on: December 27, 2016, 04:23:13 am »
This is perfect! Thanks, I didn't know this existed.
You cannot go wrong following Atmel's recommendations. See app notes AVR042 and possibly AVR040 if you have EMC concerns or requirements.
http://www.atmel.com/images/atmel-2521-avr-hardware-design-considerations_applicationnote_avr042.pdf

Graham

I'm laying out my first board in EAGLE and using an ATMega64A. I've prototyped it using an Arduino mega (and handful of other components) but am wondering what sorts of supporting components I need to think about when moving away from an Arduino platform and to my own custom board? I've jumped around in the data sheet and found some information about handling unused I/O pins, programming (for various methods), various special pins (RESET, etc.), and power limits but haven't found a suggested example wiring diagram with respect to supplying power or anything other signals like I've seen in some others. Coming from an Arduino I've never had to worry about most of this and just hoping to minimize mistakes that could land me with boards that don't work.
 


Share me

Digg  Facebook  SlashDot  Delicious  Technorati  Twitter  Google  Yahoo
Smf