Author Topic: adapters  (Read 3809 times)

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Offline Arlen moulton

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adapters
« on: November 13, 2014, 07:22:10 am »
Why did you get so many adapters Dave what use can you possibly have for 14 of them. :wtf:
 

Offline miguelvp

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Re: adapters
« Reply #1 on: November 13, 2014, 07:59:12 am »
Maybe add some context of what you are talking about?

Myself I have no clue what your comment is about
 

Offline Arlen moulton

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Re: adapters
« Reply #2 on: November 13, 2014, 06:51:23 pm »
Type Arlen Moulton into YouTube search then look on my plugs playlist and watch the first video
 

Offline Monkeh

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Re: adapters
« Reply #3 on: November 13, 2014, 07:28:36 pm »
Type Arlen Moulton into YouTube search then look on my plugs playlist and watch the first video

And which part of the 44 minute long video are you asking about, exactly?
 

Offline Arlen moulton

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Re: adapters
« Reply #4 on: November 14, 2014, 07:09:43 am »
1st parcel
 

Offline kizzap

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Re: adapters
« Reply #5 on: November 15, 2014, 02:26:45 am »
Firstly: with your posts Arlen: give some fucking context. We cannot read minds of other people. We don't know what you are referring to.

Secondly: Generally every (EVERY) video of the EEVBlog will have a video here. If you have a question relating to a specific video, find the thread for that video (it isn't hard to do) and post it under that thread.

Relating to the topic at hand:

Those double adapters: Hopefully he will destroy the things. Those things are actually ILLEGAL to use in Australia. The reason is simple: Every circuit from mains is protected via a circuit protection device (generally a combination Circuit Breaker/Residual Current Device) which protects the circuit and things attached to it. Each circuit is protected up to a certain load, which is generally the maximum load that individual circuit can cope with, with the number of outlets giving a rule of thumb as to the circuit breaker size.

What those double adapters do is allow the user to plug in more devices into a socket, then the circuit is designed to cover. The obvious case and point for example is in a kitchen. If a kitchen only has a single powerpoint for a fridge, and a double for the rest of the kitchen, protected by a single 20A socket. Assuming in the morning you wake up, grab something out of the fridge (5A), throw it into the microwave (10A), chuck the toaster on (10A) and then boil the kettle (10A)...can you see where I am going here? Thus the reason they aren't legal.

I know what you are thinking: What about those power strip boards? If you look at them, you will these days see a "Reset" button. That's because they have some circuit protection in them, which will protect the outputs and wiring.

-kizzap
<MatCat> The thing with aircraft is murphy loves to hang out with them
<Baljem> hey, you're the one who apparently pronounces FPGA 'fuhpugger'
 

Offline Tac Eht Xilef

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Re: adapters
« Reply #6 on: November 15, 2014, 02:53:37 am »
Those double adapters: Hopefully he will destroy the things. Those things are actually ILLEGAL to use in Australia. The reason is simple: Every circuit from mains is protected via a circuit protection device (generally a combination Circuit Breaker/Residual Current Device) which protects the circuit and things attached to it. Each circuit is protected up to a certain load, which is generally the maximum load that individual circuit can cope with, with the number of outlets giving a rule of thumb as to the circuit breaker size.

I haven't looked at the regs in many years, but there used to be a specific exemption for double-adapters.
 

Online tom66

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Re: adapters
« Reply #7 on: November 15, 2014, 02:02:51 pm »
Don't know how it works in Aus, but in the UK the sockets are protected by a shared ring-main breaker.

Each socket is 13A a piece, continuous load. Dual sockets are theoretically rated to 26A though I believe they only have to withstand 20A continuously. Caution should be observed when using two pieces of heating equipment on the same circuit.

If you load a socket to more than 13A, the fuse in the plug (and in the double adapter) will eventually protect it.

If you load a combination of sockets to more than 32A (for a 32A ring main) then the breaker will eventually trip.

This is of course based on thermal time constants. You can load a socket to 20A and the fuse will not blow immediately. But because both the socket and the fuse are thermal devices, if the socket overheats the fuse should have also blown...
 


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